Author Archive

Emergency Reprieve for the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers Stalled in Congress

Posted on: November 15th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

A temporary reprieve for the endangered Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers may be delayed as Congress debates the National Defense Authorization Bill:

An informal House-Senate conference committee was at a standstill late Wednesday on the annual defense authorization bill, amid a dispute over a domestic policy provision.

The sticking point was a Senate-passed provision that would expand race-based hate-crime laws ...

With no resolution late Wednesday on whether to keep the provision in the draft conference report, the goal of clearing the bill for the president’s signature by week’s end was at risk.

Congressional Quarterly, November 14, 2008
[subscription required]

Senators Daniel Akaka and Jim Webb have championed an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Bill that would require much-needed study and a report to Congress before the Army could proceed with its misguided plan to replace the historic Tomb Monument. Although the Akaka-Webb amendment was unanimously adopted by the Senate, the National Defense Authorization Bill is now tied up in conference.

Thanks to the passionate grassroots outcry and pressure from Congress, the Army let pass its own September 29 deadline for replacing the monument. However, unfortunately, there is no indication that the Army has reversed its decision to replace.

We're continuing to press decision-makers to save the Tomb. We urge concerned Americans to contact John C. Metzler, Superintendent of Arlington National Cemetery.

-- Robert Nieweg

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

With Wildfires Almost Contained, California Assesses Damage

Posted on: November 1st, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Sikes Adobe

At least 10 people are dead, some of them burned in their homes, and more than 50 firefighters injured by the wildfires that started in Southern California on Oct. 21. About 2,000 firefighters are still containing two wildfires, according to the state department of forestry and fire protection, and 100 people remain in evacuation shelters. So far, more than 15 fires have destroyed 2,200 homes and at least a dozen historic structures, the agency says.

President Bush, who has declared a major disaster in nine California counties, toured the wreckage last week with Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. More than half a million people in San Diego County were relocated in the state's largest evacuation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

No Buyers for Mid-Century Modern House Prompts Group to Think Outside the Box

Posted on: October 24th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

paschal.jpgNo buyers have stepped forward to purchase the Paschal House in Raleigh, N.C. Now the nonprofit Preservation North Carolina may hold a design contest to spur interest in developing the three-acre property appropriately, while preserving the mid-century modern structure.

"It's the greatest modern house in North Carolina," says architect Frank Harmon. "It's such an exemplary house, built with respect to site and climate. It bonds with the landscape, using all natural materials and few finishes."

Designed in 1950 by architect James Fitzgibbon, the Paschal House was out of the ordinary for North Carolina, built with a combination of modernist, specifically Wrightian, principles and all-natural materials. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Museum of the Confederacy Unveils New Plan

Posted on: October 19th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Museum of the Confederacy, RichmondAlmost broke and very controversial, Virginia's Museum of the Confederacy announced a new battle plan last month for staying relevant—and in business. Formed in the 1890s, in the last decade the Richmond-based museum has teetered toward financial collapse, endangering its research archive, artifact collection, and its home, the 1818 mansion known as the White House of the Confederacy. With an emergency room as a next-door neighbor, the museum, claiming that the downtown medical complex had made its location untenable for visitors, has begun floating a plan to build a satellite system of museums at the battlegrounds of Appomattox, Chancellorsville, Fort Monroe, and a fourth naval site near Hampton, Va.

"Moving some of the museum's collection—for example, [Robert E.] Lee's boots, tent, and sword—to Appomattox, there they would be appropriate and well displayed," says Nicholas Muller, former National Trust trustee. "This may be a clever plan." Muller led a review that told the beleaguered organization it had little time and room to maneuver if it wanted to survive.

What the museum's new plan fails to address is whether its continued existence will generate controversy. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Hip Hop History

Posted on: October 12th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

Harlem YMCAIf a party in Woodstock, N.Y., defined an era, another party in the Bronx four years later planted the seeds of a new one. On Aug. 11, 1973, Clive Campbell and his sister, Cindy, hosted a party in their high-rise at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue. Clive, also known as DJ Kool Herc, mixed and matched records on turn tables as guests in a cramped community room danced the night away. The party swelled, moved into the street, and lasted well into the next morning. That evening, the art form of hip hop, the cultural and musical phenomenon that has permeated virtually every corner of the world, was born.

"It was just a party, intended to be something positive in the community," says Cindy Campbell.

Now the tenants of the 100-unit apartment building where it all began are calling upon this unique history to keep the owner from selling the low-income housing unit to a private investor. The complex was built in 1969 as part of the state-funded Mitchell-Lama program, which created 115,000 units of affordable housing in New York City. But after 20 years in the program, BSR Management, the current owner, is allowed to opt out of the subsidy program and raise rental fees.

The tenants argue that if the building is recognized as a significant historical landmark, its affordable housing status should be preserved. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.