Author Archive

Restoring New Orleans: National Trust Volunteers

Posted on: July 11th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

National Trust Volunteer GroupI recently had the pleasure of accompanying twenty-five friends of the National Trust to New Orleans where we spent one week volunteering through the Rebuilding Together New Orleans program. We worked on the interior of a house in the Hollygrove neighborhood, the exterior of a house in the St. Roch neighborhood and finished up the week organizing the salvage materials at RTNO's warehouse. The warehouse stores architectural details such as doors, windows, brackets, columns, etc. from demolished homes for resale. The RTNO keeps the price as minimal as possible - just enough to meet their warehouse operating expenses. The one rule they have is that the materials must be used in New Orleans. It's a way to recycle the local materials that would otherwise be lost.

The National Trust volunteer group really made a difference in New Orleans and everyone returned with a personally rewarding experience. Jessica Anderson, from Dallas, TX, described her time with the group:

"Having never been there before my trip with the National Trust, I must say that New Orleans is one of the most charming cities you can visit. While talking with locals during the week, I feel as though we may never truly know all the benefits the city will reap from the good work our team put forth during the week—it is obvious that the city of New Orleans will be continuously aided by the creativity, innovation and energy put forth by our group's members. I am grateful to the Trust for providing inspiring leaders who encouraged us throughout the week, regardless of how warm the New Orleans summer "breezes" may have been.

The tour of the historic section of the city introduced us to the beauty and calm that is quintessentially NewNational Trust Volunteers in New Orleans Orleans. The old fashioned St. Charles Streetcar was wonderful, cruising along through town toward museums, the zoo, galleries, and, of course, the local watering holes – where the delightful mint juleps were enjoyed by visitors and locals alike. Since returning home from the trip, I find myself not only reminiscing about the camaraderie that takes place while making midnight trips with new friends to Café du Monde for café au lait and beignets, but also the genuine Southern hospitality and charm – our trip proved to me that New Orleans literally has something for everyone, from the demure to the risqué!"

by Rachel Russell

Statewide and Local Partnerships

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

"I'm Leaving on a Jet Plane": Final Thoughts on PLT 2008

Posted on: July 3rd, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

PLT Classroom

It has been a few days since we had to leave cool (and apparently unseasonably rainy) Portland, Maine to return to the humidity that is Washington in the summer, but the thirty-four participants of this year’s Preservation Leadership Training left with a lot more baggage (the good kind, of course). As Robin from Maryland said, “We're back home and all suffering from withdrawal! New friends, a great educational experience, a fabulous city!”

Let’s see what they took home with them:

Preservation Leadership Training Suitcase

  1. One massive ten-pound notebook filled with written resources ranging from fundraising tips to economics of historic preservation.
  2. A pocketful of Don Rypkema’s money (good questions everyone!).
  3. Tools for reenergizing their preservation work in states across the country.
  4. Maybe a little less sleep….
  5. And new network of 34 people from across the country that they can talk to on a regular basis.

The Team Project—The Baxter Building

At the dedication ceremony for the Baxter Public Library on February 21, 1889 James Phinney Baxter said: “I have reared a structure of wood and stone. You are to build character.” At the team project presentations this past Friday the five teams attempted to do just that. Each team made proposals ranging from a culinary school to mix use development for art and architecture, a retail arts incubator project, a center for preservation studies and folk arts, and finally the new home for two special collections which would effectively return the Baxter Building to its original use as a library.

These ideas fermented after early morning interviews, late nights and lots and lots of coffee. Additionally, each team pulled from personal experiences and lectures to come up with the five very unique presentations. In the end these projects will help the building’s developer to come up with a preservation friendly plan for the building that is compatible with the Portland community and mindset. As the blue team, quoting Judge Symonds at the dedication in 1889, stated at the start of their presentation, “What is the common possession of all must be preserved in the interest of all.“

Last Words

PLT Group

Hopefully this group of newly minted Preservation Leadership Training alumni will take the knowledge and experiences gained from this past week and use it in their various capacities in the historic preservation field. As Judy from New York stated:

I did not know how much I learned until after I came home from PLT. While describing the week to a friend, the amount of material and the practical experience we had with our group project suddenly dawned on me. The curriculum and project worked so well independently and together to make a great training experience”

Thanks for making this week a success! I know I took away a lot of information on preservation programs across the country all while enjoying the wide variety of food that Portland has to offer.

For more information on Preservation Leadership Training visit www.preservationnation.org and http://www.placeeconomics.com/2008/07/preservation-leadership-training.html
Quotations from the Baxter Buildings 1889 dedication ceremony are from the Special Collections at the Portland Public Library.

Photographs by Alison Hinchman, NTHP

Priya Chhaya

Center for Preservation Leadership

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Historic Homes of the Wild West

Posted on: July 2nd, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Catherine Montogomery, architect with the Oklahoma Historical Society, has put together a glimpse into life on the prairie. The first stop of the day is in Hominy, Oklahoma home of the Drummond home.

Built in 1905 it is one of the few Victorian homes built on the prairie. Built by Frederick Drummond in 1905 this is one of the few remaining, dscf0024.JPGintact Victorian homes on the prairie. Drummond was Scottish and trained with the Osage in Pawhuska where he met his wife, Addie Gantner. Shortly after marrying Addie they moved to hominy where Drummond had a 1/4 share in the Hominy Trading Co. He was a man of many trades - he started the Drummond Cattle Co. and served as mayor of Hominy as well. Remarkably the home was left intact and after the last relative passed away in the 70s the property was transferred to the OK Historical Society. They have taken great pains to maintain this property. Beverly, Director of the Drummond home, will take you on a journey through the life and times of the Drummond family.

dscf0038.JPGAfter winding our way through rural Oklahoma we found ourselves in Pawhuska, gateway to the Tall Grass Prairie Preserve. Originally the Barnard-Chapman Ranch, the Tall Grass Prairie Preserve is owned and operated by the Nature Conservancy of Oklahoma. (As a side note Ben Johnson's dad was the ranch manager. Johnson was known to return to the ranch annually. At times he brought John Wayne with him. It is reported that Wayne tried to buy the ranch, but could never entice Barnard and Chapman to sell) There are a number of original buildings thatdscf0031.JPG still remain and are primarily used for continued ranch operations. There is a bunkhouse that has been updated and is used for trustee and development functions, but really it isn't about the remaining buildings. The best part is the drive through the prairie. This is a feast for the senses. The color, life, and sounds of the wildlife are astounding. Harvey Payne, Executive Director of the Tall Grass Prairie Preserve, shared a wealth of information about how the preserve was created and how it is managdscf0027.JPGed and maintained. According to Harvey the prairie was originally a forest of spruce and jack pine. However, over the course of many generations of burning - probably three times a year - the prairie was created. Harvey calls it a "human induced landscape". The three burns took place during the spring and late summer - most likely lightening strikes and occassionally some Native American burning. In the fall and mid-October Native Americans set the fires for a controlled burn.  Given these changes to the landscape this is extremely fertile land. A head of cattle can gain up to 4 pounds a day grazing on the prairie. This takesme to what I think is the most remarkable sight. We had an opportunity to see the buffalo - not up close and personal, but close enough for this city girl (I still have a healthy respect for my larger than life fellow creatures) Anyway, I could have easily been enticed to "stay and set a while", watch the buffalo, the birds and the horizon forever. However time stands still for no one and after a while we were off to our next stop,  Pawnee Bill's Ranch.

Pawnee Bill, was so named by the Pawnee Indians with which he lived and worked. In his early years he worked as a teacher with the Pawnee. In 1883 Pawnee Bill created his wild west show. Not only was he was the creator, he was also the business mind behind "Pawnee Bill's Historic Wild West ~ America's National Entertainment!" It was a very diverse family affair - his wife Mae was a main character in the show for practically the entire run of the show. He also included Sioux, Pawnee, Russians, Cossacks, an Aborigini, and African-Americans to name a few. In its heyday the show required 52 rail cars, would spend one day in a town, do the show and then pack up and head on to the next destination.

The ranch was originally 2,000 acres - the OKHS has been able to retain 500 acres. There are a number of buildings, including a museum which explains the Wild West Shows history, but really the piece de resistance is Pawnee Bill's home. Built in 1910, and designed by James Hamilton out of Philadelphia, the home took a year to build. The home has 14 rooms and has an interesting mix of local and exotic materials.

The day is a great prairie adventure, a unique blend of building preservation and cultural landscapes. This is a must see session!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Pillars of Preservation: Oklahoma's Federal Courthouse Buildings

Posted on: June 27th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

misc-06-26-110.jpgmisc-06-26-100.jpg

Near the heart of downtown Tulsa sits the Federal Courthouse. Recently renovated, this small town gem has been returned to its former glory. Join Steven Kline, U.S. General Services Administration, and other members of the restoration team to learn about G.S.A.'s committment to reinvesting in downtowns across the United States. Steve will take you through the painstaking process of paint analysis as well as how 21st century security, life safety and technology requirements have been sensitively incorporated. Steve will also discuss the G.S.A.'s "Art in Architecture" program. In addition, there will be an opportunity to learn about other G.S.A. projects across Oklahoma - with your own view from the jury box! Don't miss this opportunity to learn about G.S.A.'s commitment to historic preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Meeting the Baxter: Welcome to Preservation Leadership Training

Posted on: June 25th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

PLT Participants looking at the back of the Baxter Building - Image by Alison HinchmanSunday was the first day of Preservation Leadership Training 2008 and this year we are in beautiful Portland, Maine where the weather is nice, the air smells great, and the fog rolls in whenever it pleases creating an eerie view from Top of the East, the restaurant at the top of our hotel. On Sunday morning thirty-four travel-worn participants made their way into the Longfellow Room to start an intensive one-week program that will make them laugh, and maybe, just maybe, tear their hair out. In the end though, all of them will walk way with a strong network of fellow preservationists and knowledge that will help them lead the preservation movement in their local communities and reach across state lines to work on those issues that require us to work together.

Preservation Leadership Training (PLT) is an intensive one-week experience tailored to respond to the needs of state and local preservation organizations and agencies. It emphasizes providing a participatory experience in leadership and organizational development techniques and the most up-to-date and effective information and training in current preservation practices, issues and action strategies. In addition to the classroom work these participants will work on a team project that has relevance and connection to the host community.

First a few stats—this year's group comes from 18 states and serves as executive directors, board members, volunteers and in one case a newbie to preservation having only been introduced to the field six months ago. After a rigorous application process they finally arrive ready to share and ready to jump right in and become official participants in what we call “Preservation Boot Camp.”

Rachael, a native of Portland, exclaimed that she “is so psyched about being here. It is so great to be with a group of people and it is nice to work on a project that is outside the norm and you are able to concentrate on developing your own skills while simultaneously hearing about other people's passions as well as about different resources across the country.”

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.