Author Archive

Three Thousand Miles from my Napa Valley Home

Posted on: January 15th, 2009 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

Three thousand miles from my Napa Valley hometown, I have landed in the city of Birmingham, Alabama. Like thirty five other country-wide preservation leadership participants, we have all come to learn more, network a bit and for some of us, begin to better understand the extraordinary civil rights history to be found in this city. To that, history may be seen and felt from the wrenching events that took place but 48 years ago.

Barbeque from Dreamland.

Barbeque from Dreamland.

For me though, a micro fruit farmer and culinary focused Californian, my attention is also food-focused. On this trip that attention will focus on the culinary traditions of the deep south, truly a unique and distinguishable cultural pathway. So what do regional food traditions have to do with preservation?
On a historical basis, we saw civilizations evolving, dominating and being defined based upon natural resource availability. Agriculture was king, eating was (and is) fundamental. It is the ghost of those past landscapes, economies and food resources that have come to define the food traditions that we now rely upon, that we seek out on a daily subconscious basis.

Fresh, juicy pig lips.

Fresh, juicy pig lips.

In the south, you see the legacy and evolution of African-American food traditions: b-b-que, greens, fried chicken, lots of pork, stews, preserved meats and vegetables and unique gravies. This legacy has defined the African American southern food tradition; a reflection of place, experience and history. These traditions have been brought forward as the new wave of Birmingham cooking manifests itself in hip restaurants that bring elements of old, new and fresh all together.

Macaroni and cheese and pulled pork sandwiches at Dreamland.

Macaroni and cheese and pulled pork sandwiches at Dreamland.

I have seen these most delicious plates of living history, from pulled pork sandwiches with macaroni and cheese to ribs, trigger fish with turnips, coconut cake and peanut butter ice cream using local peanuts. Put simply, food can quickly tell you where you are. And if you want to understand where you are, go back 100 years and you will begin to really understand why that turnip is on your plate next to the boiled greens and chopped pork.

So if preservation has to do with celebrating, revitalizing and educating, than surely this must include realizing that the very foods we pick, eat and enjoy have a long story to tell as well. And like an endangered church, bridge or house, we can easily loose the very food traditions which so subtly but surely defined place and culture.

Yes, there is history to food. Bon appétit.

-- Wendy Ward

Wendy Ward is the director of Preservation Napa Valley, she also has an extensive background in sustainable farming and is the current owner of a micro-farm. She is a participant in this year’s Preservation Leadership Training in Birmingham, Alabama. If you are in Birmingham on Friday, January 17, 2009 please attend the public presentations which will take place at 5:30 at the Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Birmingham, Alabama. Click here to view the flier. For more information on PLT visit our website.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

My Historic Washington: Clarendon

Posted on: January 15th, 2009 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

Clarendon from the corner of Wilson and Washington Boulevards.

To many, Clarendon might not fit so nicely into that title.

First of all, it’s not in Washington. Secondly, with the amount of development that the entire Ballston–Virginia Square–Clarendon corridor has seen over the past decade, one could easily disregard the historic nature of the buildings and neighborhoods that make up the heart of Arlington. It’s true, Clarendon and the surrounding neighborhoods are young and their short history is one of constant redevelopment. In my opinion, however, it is this youth that gives the neighborhood its distinct flavor and an energy that is easily felt along its boulevards.

While no longer located in the District of Columbia, the area now known as Clarendon (much like Old Town) was once part of Alexandria, the second of two counties divided by Congress to comprise D.C. Due to the growing questions around the slave trade and its future in Washington, Alexandria County petitioned, and in 1846 was retroceded, to Virginia. By 1852, Alexandria the city was incorporated from a portion of the county bearing the same name. So, now you had the city of Alexandria in addition Alexandria County, which was mostly rural. This naturally led to some confusion, as the two were right next to each other, so eventually Alexandria County became Arlington County, taking its name from the National Cemetery located within its boundaries.

For anyone unfamiliar with Northern Virginia, Arlington is still a county, not a city, and is made up of neighborhoods that share the names of their Metro stops. Clarendon’s Metro station is just a short distance from the neighborhood’s original train stop - a trolley car station located at the present intersection of Washington and Clarendon Boulevards. Streetcars came to the area in the late 1900s, and it was around this station and the two lines that converged there that Arlington’s original downtown developed. Department stores sprung up in the 1920s, and businesses began to stretch west into the adjacent neighborhoods of Virginia Square and Ballston.

Today, the large department stores are gone, but the development has not stopped. With the arrival of the Metro in the early 1980’s, a mix of small shops, restaurants and bars began to fill the storefronts along Clarendon and Wilson Boulevards. More recently, development within Arlington has been centered on high-rise offices, apartments and luxury condos. While Clarendon is certainly no exception to this growth, it has maintained the flavor that an eclectic mix of shops and restaurants can add to a neighborhood.

If you walk down Wilson Boulevard during the warmer months, you’re likely to find sidewalk patios, spot cheerful patrons at rooftop bars, or even hear some local live music at one of our neighborhood festival days (Clarendon Day in September is the largest and the neighborhood even holds a pro-am bicycle race in the summer). The energy doesn’t cease when the weather gets cold either. Establishments like O’Sullivan’s (Irish food and sports), Iota (live music) and the Galaxy Hut (Pac Man!) are always fun and can get quite festive on any given night.

People may think of Clarendon as solely a hangout for the younger crowd, but there’s plenty to do for all ages around here - it only feels young. So if you’re visiting Arlington Cemetery for the day, saving some cash by staying at a hotel in Northern Virginia, or just looking for somewhere different to eat and have a good time, try Clarendon; it’s my historic Washington.

- Matt Ringelstetter

Matt Ringelstetter is the web team coordinator for PreservationNation.org. Stay tuned leading up to the inauguration as more National Trust staffers share their stories about the greater D.C. area. Coming to town for the historic event? Be sure to visit our new Preservationist’s Guide to Washington.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

New Partners "Make a Lot of Noise and Save a Lot of Buildings"

Posted on: January 15th, 2009 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Staff from the National Trust Mountains/Plains Regional Office and Montana Preservation Alliance with  Big Arm Association Members at the Big Arm School, Big Arm Montana (Photo Courtesy Chere Jiusto)

Staff from the National Trust Mountains/Plains Office and Montana Preservation Alliance with Big Arm Association members at the Big Arm School in Montana (Photo: Chere Jiusto)

Can you hear it? The bustle of visitors to a new historic preservation outreach center, a technical brochure brought to life in Spanish, windows being restored because tradesmen and high school students are learning how, maps being drawn and data being entered about the rich heritage of a rural area, cheers for a plan to save an historic theater -- sounds like preservation to me! Turns out, 31 new field representatives hired by 25 statewide and local organizations through the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Partners in the Field program sure can make a lot of noise and save a lot of buildings.

That is just what the Robert W. Wilson Charitable Trust intended when it extended challenge grants to the National Trust’s Statewide and Local Partners. The idea was to put preservation professionals on the ground, in the field, and at the table so that they could expand the reach of our Partner organizations and Regional Offices.

In Montana, that means working collaboratively to save the Big Arms one-room school house on Flathead Lake from the unseemly fate of being used for firefighting practice.

Cresson Area Historical Association members at the Benjamin Franklin Jones Cottage, Cresson Springs Resort in Pennsylvania (Photo: Erin Hammerstedt)

Cresson Area Historical Association members at the Benjamin Franklin Jones Cottage, Cresson Springs Resort, Pennsylvania (Photo: Erin Hammerstedt)

In Los Angeles, it means that Spanish speaking Karina Muniz can work directly with Latino property owners to provide technical assistance. In Northeast Ohio, it means that low-income homeowners learn about and apply for low-interest loans for rehabilitation. And sometimes, it means a shout out for an historic property like this one in Pennsylvania.

We all know that preservation happens one building, one neighborhood, one landscape at a time. In the coming months we’ll bring you lots of preservation stories from the field representatives themselves. In February, we will announce a new crop of field representatives made possible through the second-round of Partners in the Field grants.

Learn more about the Partners in the Field program.

-- Susan West Montgomery

Susan West Montgomery is the associate director for Statewide and Local Partnerships in the Center for Preservation Leadership at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

My Historic Washington: Lafayette Square

Posted on: January 15th, 2009 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

We've all heard the expression, "If only walls could talk." But I would like to ask, what about town squares?

It seems like there is one no matter where you go - a central meeting place, a public park, a town landmark. Whether in a small village or a bustling city, these squares help form a community's identity, its personality. And if you're going to be in my town for the inauguration, I invite you to come visit our nation's square.

Formerly known as President’s Park, Lafayette Square is the D.C. neighborhood that President-Elect Barack Obama will soon call home. If it could talk, it would tell you the story of the United States in a way that no other place could - through tales of the legendary people who have met on the benches here and of the historic buildings that surrounded them.

I have the pleasure of peering out of my office window every day to see the square, which never fails to be a lively place. Some days there are packs of protestors, while others are quiet and calm. Sometimes there are people lying in the grass or flipping pennies into the fountains, and sometimes there are construction crews assembling barriers and metal gates to protect important White House visitors. And don't even get me started on the motorcades...

Lafayette Square has slowly been transforming though, a process that began in late 2008. See, every four years, rows of bleachers are erected in front of the White House and on the south end of the square so that we can properly welcome (or re-welcome) a president. With just days until the 2009 inauguration, crews are scrambling to complete the finishing touches. Check out some of the photos I've been taking this week in the slideshow above.

Lately, the Hay Adams Hotel has been buzzing with excitement, TV trucks and many secret service agents. As you probably know from the news, this historic hotel has been one of two temporary homes for the First Family as the big day gets closer and closer. For security reasons, all vehicle traffic has been diverted and foot traffic has been limited. Thankfully, it hasn't stopped people from enjoying the square or from taking pictures by its statues.

Others who work in the area scrunch their noses at the sound of what could be considered chaos. I, however, view it as history happening right before my eyes. Lafayette Square is a special place because for centuries, others just like me have witnessed the buzz on the square before, during and after historic events that eventually make their way into our history textbooks. Overall, I think those of us who work on the square are lucky. While we might not have tickets to the inauguration ceremonies or get to see the parade, we have had front row seats for the most important event of all: a historic election that will bring many new faces to our square.

If you are making the trip to Washington, I invite you to take a stroll past the I (or "Eye" according to locals) Street and 17th Street barriers to the Decatur House on Lafayette Square. We offer brochures for a free cell phone audio tour that will teach you the history of Lafayette Square and its value to our nation. And while you are here, you can also warm up in our popular museum gift shop. It will be a destination for inauguration mementos and souvenirs.

– Mame Croze 

Mame Croze is the manager of public relations and marketing for the Decatur House, a National Trust historic site. Stay tuned leading up to the inauguration as more National Trust staffers share their stories about the greater D.C. area. Coming to town for the historic event? Be sure to visit our new Preservationist’s Guide to Washington.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Group Dynamics, Team Building, and Making it Personal

Posted on: January 14th, 2009 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

The 16th Street Baptist Church which has recently completed a $3 million restoration project.

Masonic Temple

I am very privileged to be a participant in Preservation Leadership Training 2009 and a first-time visitor to Birmingham, Alabama. The PLT experience includes an interesting study of group dynamics and team building. I am one of seven members of the “Green” Team, a group of professionals working in nonprofit organization, tourism agencies and government agencies from across the country. One of our team members is the daughter of Arthur Shores, an African American attorney that filed the lawsuit for Lucy v. Adams, one of the lawsuits challenging school segregation in Alabama. The 1955 Supreme Court decision ordered the University of Alabama to allow Ms. Lucy to register for graduate school. Arthur Shores had his law offices in the 1922 Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge (Masonic Temple) along with the headquarters of the NAACP, the Southern Negro Youth Congress (SNYC) and other organizations that brought together professionals, working class and upper class activities. “Green Team” member Barbara Shores has shared personal accounts of the events in 1963 when her family home was bombed and other threats carried out against her parents and other activists.

The Masonic Temple is the 2009 PLT project site, located in the Fourth Avenue North Historic District. For Birmingham’s African American community, for decades the Masonic Temple was the place of social interaction, entertainment, information and educational gatherings.

Lawyers, doctors, dentists and other influential members of the African-American community had their offices in the Masonic Temple. Social Clubs, sororities and fraternities held meetings, parties and formal balls in the second-floor hall. Barbara Shores has also shared her many memories of visiting her father's office, the parties and events that she attended in the ballroom, going to the doctors' offices, and the ice cream treats whenever she visited the pharmacy. While the building is still in use, it has fallen into disrepair and could benefit from a major infusion of resources.

4th Avenue

The Masonic Temple building is one of several iconic structures in the neighborhood. PLT participants are spending this week studying the site and developing reuse strategies that will be presented during a public community meeting scheduled for Friday evening. I anticipate lots of creative ideas and financing suggestions that will be useful to the community, and recognizes the building’s importance in bridging Birmingham’s past and future.

Preservation Leadership Training group activity

Birmingham is a treasure trove of historic sites and sounds, and I am excited and humbled to have walked along some of the same well-worn and familiar paths. National Trust Conference Staff and our host Main Street Birmingham have shaped a week of engaging speakers and interactive educational opportunities, and a chance to develop a reuse strategy for a downtown landmark building. PLT participants are based at the recently renovated Highland Hotel located in the historic Five Points South area of Birmingham. Five Points is a walkable neighborhood of 1920s low-rise commercial buildings, a great mix of old and new with interesting shops and restaurants, a restored theater that has taken on new life, three parks, schools, churches and synagogues, and residential buildings whose distinctive architecture reflects the community’s grand past. The setting encourages lots of dinnertime exploration and lots of opportunities to contribute to the local economy. I’m doing my fair share.

-- Evelyn Frazier

Evelyn Frazier is a program officer at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. She is a participant in this year's Preservation Leadership Training in Birmingham, Alabama. If you are in Birmingham on Friday, January 17, 2009 please attend the public presentations which will take place at 5:30 at the Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Birmingham, Alabama. Click here to view the flier. For more information on PLT visit our website.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.