Author Archive

Weekend Reads from OregonLive, The Kansas City Star, and More

Posted on: May 22nd, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

By Tim Mikulski

Welcome to a recently added feature here at the PreservationNation blog: Weekend Reads, wherein we'll be sharing a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

Wide sidewalks and historic commercial buildings on Main Street in Louisville, Kentucky.
Wide sidewalks and historic commercial buildings on Main Street in Louisville, Kentucky.

“It’s National Preservation Month once again, and here in Louisville, it’s all too often the case that preservationists find themselves at odds with various development and business interests who quickly dismiss such heritage endeavors as bad for the bottom line. Luckily, we know that preservation and business go hand in hand, and so do a growing number of local entrepreneurs. Take Tim Koons-McGee, for example, the owner of local ice cream parlor The Comfy Cow.” – Broken Sidewalk: Comfy Cow Owner Tim Koons-McGee Talks Historic Preservation and Why It’s Good for His Business

“Preservationists say some 1,700 historic properties across six Portland neighborhoods – and countless others throughout Oregon – may not be protected from demolition without help from the Oregon Supreme Court. Worries are mounting because of a recent Court of Appeals decision involving a historic property in Lake Oswego. Under the ruling, a property owner can overturn regulations to preserve buildings designated as historic if the designation was imposed by a local government.” – OregonLive: Oregon Supreme Court Case May Alter Landscape of Historic Preservation

“The father-son team has been restoring historic homes together for several years, first in Liberty and now in Kansas City, where some 7,000 vacant buildings have been a citywide concern for years. Thanks to these two, there is now one fewer to worry about. ‘We knew the house was in bad shape. What we didn’t know was that the city was targeting it. Within a week after we bought it, we were getting threatening letters from the city saying something needed to be done here,’ Ken says. ‘We don’t blame them. Something did need to be done.’” – The Kansas City Star: Father-Son Restorers Turn Ugly Homes Into Historic Gems

“A project has been launched in California to focus on the state's LGBT history as work advances on a National Historic Landmark LGBTQ Theme Study and proposed framework for the National Park Service. Called California Pride: Mapping LGBTQ Histories, the online, crowdsourced archive will feature, according to organizers, the ‘memories, stories, and images related to sites throughout the Golden State associated with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer experience.’” – The Bay Area Reporter: CA LGBT History Project Launches

“The [North Carolina] budget inserts the historic preservation tax credit of House Bill 152, which passed the House in March but has languished in the Senate’s Ways and Means Committee, which rarely meets. The recommendation is for a 15 percent tax credit for qualified expenditures up to $10 million, a 10 percent tax credit for qualified expenditures between $10 million and $20 million, and a small credit for structures that don’t produce income...The historic preservation tax credits have been instrumental in several revitalization projects in downtown Winston-Salem, with a combined capital investment value of more than $700 million.” – Winston-Salem Journal: Plan Would Restore Historic Preservation, Medical Expense Exemptions

"Pictures of the architectural splendours of Palmyra make it plain how desperately this place needs to be preserved. And if anyone thinks there’s a difference between saving stone and saving people, look on the faces of the ancient Palmyrans. The past is not a remote place. It is the mirror of ourselves. To cherish history and art is to care about the future." – The Guardian: Palmyra: is saving priceless antiquity as important as saving people?

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Weekend Reads from Architect, CityLab, and More

Posted on: May 8th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

By Tim Mikulski, Manager, Public Affairs

Welcome to a recently added feature here at the PreservationNation blog: Weekend Reads, wherein we'll be sharing a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

The main waiting room at Penn Station, New York City, circa 1911.
The main waiting room at Penn Station, New York City, circa 1911.

“Richard Cameron and James Grimes of the architecture and design firm Atelier & Co., in Brooklyn, have developed a plan to rebuild New York City's old Penn Station in all its former glory. The original McKim Mead & White structure, which opened in 1910, was torn down in 1963 and replaced with the current underground station that serves 600,000 passengers a day.” CityLab: A 3-Part Plan to Rebuild New York’s Old Penn Station... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Celebrating National Park Week 2015: Where History and Nature Intersect

Posted on: April 21st, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

150421_blog-photo_John-Jarvis-1
Jonathan B. Jarvis, director of the National Park Service, speaks at the Jefferson Memorial on Thursday, April 16.

It’s National Park Week 2015 -- a week-long celebration hosted by the National Park Service and the National Park Foundation that encourages the public to visit, volunteer at, and share stories of their favorite parks. The week’s events include a weekend of free admission, a day of service on Earth Day, and online sharing of user photos and memories.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

All in the Family: Barbara Donnelly Dishes About Lockport’s Gaylord Building

Posted on: March 17th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

By Katherine Malone-France, Vice President of Historic Sites

150317_blog-photo_barbi-during-and-present-gaylord
Barbara Donnelley during the restoration of the Gaylord Building (left); the present-day facade of the Gaylord Building (right)

Fast facts about the Gaylord Building, a National Trust Historic Site in Lockport, Illinois:

  • It is the only industrial building within our portfolio of historic sites.
  • It represents a great example of adaptive reuse in the Illinois and Michigan Canal Heritage Corridor, the first heritage area ever designated in the country.
  • And it all came to be thanks to the effort of one devoted family.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Big Win at Pullman Historic District, Now a National Monument!

Posted on: February 19th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

150218_blog-photo_pullman0226
The Administration Building's clock tower was restored after a 1998 fire.

Moments ago, President Obama designated a portion of Chicago’s Pullman Historic District a National Monument, making it the Windy City’s first unit of the National Park Service. The move comes after decades of work to protect and promote the historic neighborhood by community members and supporters who joined elected officials and the president himself to celebrate the announcement in the heart of Pullman this afternoon.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

10 Iconic Movie Sets Starring … The Antiquities Act!

Posted on: February 19th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Denise Ryan, Director of Public Lands Policy

An R2-D2 character visits Death Valley (also known as the planet Tatooine in "Star Wars"). Credit: Alyse & Remi, Flickr
An R2-D2 figure visits Death Valley National Park (also known as the planet Tatooine in "Star Wars").

The Antiquities Act may sound like a dusty old piece of legislation, a relic of a bygone era that long ago ceased to have relevance for average Americans. But you will spill your popcorn to learn that the Antiquities Act -- considered America’s first preservation law enacted in 1906 -- continues to play a critical role in protecting places across the country that have been featured in some of Hollywood’s best-known blockbusters.

From “Star Wars” to “Titanic,” from “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” to “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” some of our most beloved movies were filmed in landscapes and historic sites protected by the Antiquities Act. "The Godfather: Part II," "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," and "The Cider House Rules" are all Oscar winners and feature places protected by this little-known law which allow the President to permanently protect federally owned or controlled structures and lands.

On Thursday, February 19, the President will take direct action for the 14th time and establish a new National Monument from a portion of the Pullman Historic District in Chicago. The Pullman neighborhood was featured in the Oscar-winning movies "The Road to Perdition" and "The Fugitive," creating yet another link between great films and iconic American landscapes and historic sites.

Before you settle down this Sunday night to watch the stars walk the red carpet on their way to the 87th Academy Awards, enjoy nine more of our favorite places featured in motion pictures protected and recognized by the Antiquities Act of 1906 -- now including historic Pullman in Chicago!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.