Author Archive

 

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Oheka Castle. “Across the courtesy bay the white palaces of fashionable East Egg glittered along the water...”

You either love or hate Baz Luhrmann’s recent and unabashedly lavish film adaptation. But one thing’s for sure: few works capture the American imagination more than F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby.

It was the Roaring Twenties, an era when flapper dresses and fireworks set to brass jazz bands sent nights spiraling into debauched infamy. It was a world we now can only imagine, but once, long ago in the glimmering past, it did exist. And though Luhrmann's set designer Catherine Martin built Jay Gatsby's mansion on soundstages for the film, all that jazz was based on Long Island's real architectural flare.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

No School Left Behind: Saving Montana's Rural Classrooms

Posted on: June 24th, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

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The little school on the prairie. Rural schoolhouses, like this one in western Montana, may soon exist only in fiction.

Sandy Hart’s grandmother rode her horse to school. Out in rural Montana, wooden bell towers ring in the school day as the stars and stripes flutter atop lone flagpoles.

Tucked among mountains and prairies, these schoolhouses only have one or two classrooms. Yet steeped in the state’s homestead history, the rough hewn logs, clapboard, or cobblestone walls, are -- or were once -- a beacon for learning and community life.

Montana abounds with these one-and-two room schools built to educate children in the countryside. But these schools are getting, literally, left behind.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

The Abyssinian Meeting House: Maine's Untold African-American Heritage

Posted on: June 21st, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

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The Abyssinian is the third-oldest standing African-American meetinghouse in the U.S. (The first two are in Boston and Nantucket, MA.)

150 years ago, ships anchored and runaway slaves hurriedly disembarked on the Maine State Pier. They covertly walked up India Street onto Newbury Street to the Abyssinian Meeting House in search of help. There, in this humble house of worship, they found it.

The Abyssinian: where William Lloyd Garrison and, locals think, Frederick Douglass gave impassioned speeches while members of the congregation helped those on the Underground Railroad find their way to Canada -- and freedom.

As local preservationist David Paul claims, this was “the black history that nobody told.” ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.