Author Archive

Life in a Converted Firehouse

Posted on: March 10th, 2015 by Meghan Drueding No Comments

 

150310_blog_photo_firehouse
Inside David Braly and Mark Montoya's converted firehouse home

Everyone likes the idea of living in a converted something-or-other. An old barn, an industrial loft, a former schoolhouse: With a lot of TLC, all of these building types have the potential to become comfortable, appealing residences.

In Montgomery, Alabama, David Braly and Mark Montoya were up to this task. They lavished attention on a neglected firehouse, turning it into a lovely (and quirky) home that honors both past and present. Photographers Steve Gross and Susan Daley have documented the Braly-Montoya residence in the images that appear in the upcoming Spring issue of Preservation magazine, as well as in the video shown here. Enjoy!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

Industrial Strength: The Adaptive Reuse of Ames Shovel Works

Posted on: January 7th, 2015 by Meghan Drueding 2 Comments

 

The historic Steam Hammer Shop, which was damaged by fire in the early 1900s.
The historic Steam Hammer Shop, which was damaged by fire in the early 1900s.

There’s nothing like the proposed demolition of a beloved property to motivate a community. For the town of Easton, Massachusetts, that property was the Ames Shovel Works, a granite-walled relic of New England’s Industrial Age. The site forms the heart of a National Register-listed historic district, and when it was threatened a few years ago, Easton’s residents weren’t going to let it go without a fight.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

What It’s Like to Live in a Louis Kahn House

Posted on: December 29th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding 1 Comment

 

The Fisher-Kahn House presents an understated, cypress-clad façade to the street.
The Fisher-Kahn House presents an understated, cypress-clad façade to the street.

Most people associate the revered Modernist architect Louis Kahn with his enduring institutional buildings, such as the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, the National Assembly Building in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, Connecticut. But Kahn designed houses, too -- extraordinary dwellings filled with natural light and beloved by their owners. One of the nine in existence, the 1967 Fisher-Kahn House in Hatboro, Pennsylvania, was deeded to the National Trust in 2011 through an agreement with its original owners, Doris and Norman Fisher.

The National Trust created a strict protective easement for the property and found a preservation-minded couple, Charles Firmin-Didot and Bianca Sforni, to buy it. A story in the Winter 2015 issue of Preservation magazine takes a closer look at the house’s past and present, but here we’ve included some reflections on what it’s like to be there from those who know it best.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

[Interview] Q & A with Musician and Design Blogger Moby

Posted on: September 5th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding 4 Comments

 

The dramatic exterior of Moby’s restored 1920s French Norman-style house in Los Angeles. Credit Moby
The dramatic exterior of Moby’s restored 1920s French Norman-style house in Los Angeles

In our conversation with Moby for the upcoming Fall 2014 issue of Preservation magazine, he had so many interesting things to say that we didn’t have room for the whole interview in print. Read on for an extended version of our talk with the multitalented electronic musician and DJ, whose writings and photographs of local buildings are showcased on his blog Moby Los Angeles Architecture. An avid architecture and preservation buff, Moby has also shared with us some photos of his restored 1920s house in Los Angeles, which you can see below.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

The Underground Legacy of Shockoe Bottom in Richmond, Virginia

Posted on: July 14th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding 9 Comments

 

Richmond’s Shockoe Bottom district in 2013. Credit: Ron Cogswell
Richmond’s Shockoe Bottom district in 2013

Just east of downtown Richmond, Va., on the banks of the James River, you’ll find a historic neighborhood of national importance: Shockoe Bottom. From the 1830s through the Civil War, the area was the site of one of the largest slave trades in the United States, second only to New Orleans.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

Lone Fir Pioneer Cemetery in Portland, Oregon: A Refuge for All

Posted on: June 19th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding

 

Credit: Metro and Friends of Lone Fir Cemetery
The MacLeay family mausoleum, in the southern section of Lone Fir.

Portland, Ore., might have been known as Boston, Ore., if not for the outcome of a simple coin toss in 1845. Founding father Asa Lovejoy had been pulling for Boston as the city’s name, but co-founder Francis Pettygrove, who was partial to the Portland moniker, outflipped him.

The penny they used is enshrined at the Oregon Historical Society, and Lovejoy himself rests in peace at Lone Fir Pioneer Cemetery, in the city’s Buckman neighborhood. (Pettygrove, fittingly enough, is buried in another cemetery on the opposite side of the Willamette River.)

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.