Author Archive

[Interview] Q & A with Musician and Design Blogger Moby

Posted on: September 5th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding 2 Comments

 

The dramatic exterior of Moby’s restored 1920s French Norman-style house in Los Angeles. Credit Moby
The dramatic exterior of Moby’s restored 1920s French Norman-style house in Los Angeles

In our conversation with Moby for the upcoming Fall 2014 issue of Preservation magazine, he had so many interesting things to say that we didn’t have room for the whole interview in print. Read on for an extended version of our talk with the multitalented electronic musician and DJ, whose writings and photographs of local buildings are showcased on his blog Moby Los Angeles Architecture. An avid architecture and preservation buff, Moby has also shared with us some photos of his restored 1920s house in Los Angeles, which you can see below.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

The Underground Legacy of Shockoe Bottom in Richmond, Virginia

Posted on: July 14th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding 9 Comments

 

Richmond’s Shockoe Bottom district in 2013. Credit: Ron Cogswell
Richmond’s Shockoe Bottom district in 2013

Just east of downtown Richmond, Va., on the banks of the James River, you’ll find a historic neighborhood of national importance: Shockoe Bottom. From the 1830s through the Civil War, the area was the site of one of the largest slave trades in the United States, second only to New Orleans.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

Lone Fir Pioneer Cemetery in Portland, Oregon: A Refuge for All

Posted on: June 19th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding

 

Credit: Metro and Friends of Lone Fir Cemetery
The MacLeay family mausoleum, in the southern section of Lone Fir.

Portland, Ore., might have been known as Boston, Ore., if not for the outcome of a simple coin toss in 1845. Founding father Asa Lovejoy had been pulling for Boston as the city’s name, but co-founder Francis Pettygrove, who was partial to the Portland moniker, outflipped him.

The penny they used is enshrined at the Oregon Historical Society, and Lovejoy himself rests in peace at Lone Fir Pioneer Cemetery, in the city’s Buckman neighborhood. (Pettygrove, fittingly enough, is buried in another cemetery on the opposite side of the Willamette River.)

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

 

Credit: Robert C. Lautman, National Building Museum

Most of the nation’s architecturally distinctive Midcentury Modern housing developments are concentrated in sunny California. But others exist in pockets around the country, one of the most notable being Hollin Hills in Alexandria, Va. Located about 14 miles outside Washington, D.C., the 326-acre community with more than 450 homes serves as a well-preserved paradise for midcentury aficionados.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

PHOTO TOUR: Revitalization Through Adaptive Reuse in Vallejo, Calif.

Posted on: March 18th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding

 

Credit: Leah Nash
Temple Art Lofts in Vallejo, Calif.

In the upcoming Spring issue of Preservation, we explore Vallejo, Calif., through the lens of the Temple Art Lofts, an adaptive reuse building that symbolizes the city’s decline and renewal. Through the 1990s, Vallejo’s economy boomed, thanks to the presence of the U.S. Navy’s Mare Island base. But when the Navy left in 1996, the dollars spent at local businesses dried up, and by 2008 the city had declared bankruptcy.

Now, the skyrocketing price of real estate elsewhere in the San Francisco Bay Area is causing developers and entrepreneurs to take a second look at Vallejo. Case in point: developer Meea Kang, who boldly converted a pair of derelict historic buildings into the award-winning Temple Art Lofts.

We had so many great photos of the Lofts and the surrounding city that we couldn’t use them all in our print story. So we’ve collected a few of our favorites here. Join us on behind the scenes in the waterfront city of Vallejo.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.