Author Archive

 

Ferris Wheels and Shikinen Sengu: Preservation Wayne looks at the replacement of historic landmarks, and how this can affect their surroundings. While die-hard preservationists may lament over the loss of a historic building, Wayne acknowledges that appropriate rebuilding can enhance the surviving buildings and areas. [Preservation Wayne]

Historic College Hill: Like any other institution of higher learning, UNC-Greensboro is rapidly growing and in need of expanding in order to accommodate. Standing in the way of at least one phase of this expansion is a small residential area named College Hill--a National Register designated neighborhood. [Preservation Greensboro]

The Old House and the Sea: Clinghouse--a century-old mansion built on a rock in  Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay--has quite a unique history. [New York Times]

10 Myths About Abraham Lincoln: Slaves? Depression? Lovers? President Lincoln's Cottage addresses some of the most widespread rumors surrounding our 16th President. [President Lincoln's Cottage]

Marlan Blackwell's Arkansas House: A fire-damaged property gets an sleek, modern redesign. [ModernTulsa]

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

 

Harley Davidson Museum in Milwaukee. Pentagram Architects

Milwaukee's New Harley-Davidson Museum and the Creation of Public Space: Built within a reclaimed industrial area along the Menomonee River, the design of the Harley-Davidson Museum seeks to "integrate the site back into the city; respect and reflect the site's history; make the water an important recreational element and plan for future development." With these goals in mind, Pentagram Architects have "developed an urban design that essentially restored the area's lost street grid and, by doing this, connected the site to the surrounding city by giving it a scale and 'grain' that felt like a neighborhood within the city." The design of the Museum and its surrounding area offers a public space fit for the street-level rally atmosphere of places like Sturgis—whose weeklong rally begins today—and widespread amongst bike culture. [Wheels: The New York Times Blogs]

Sustainability and Historic Resources: Sustainability is all about using the resources we already have in a smarter, more efficient manner. Did you know that 48% of US greenhouse gas emissions come from the construction, operation and demolition of buildings? Preserving our existing built resources can be an effective way to help with climate control. The city of Boulder, Colorado has recently revised its Green Building code, acknowledging the link between preservation and sustainability. [PreserveNJ]

Montpelier Restoration Update: The "Father of the Constitution's" Orange, Virginia estate continues its restoration project. Included in this update is a video of architectural research director Gardiner Hallock installing rosettes in the Drawing Room, and photos of the recreated "Madison Road" leading up to the mansion. [Montpelier Restoration Updates]

Las Cruces, New Mexico--The Museum of Expensive Mistakes in Downtown Revitalization: Pedestrian Malls, Historic Teardowns, plenty of surface parking lots--common revitalization processes like these have the ability to create a ghost town, rather than a revitalized downtown. Place Economics examines these common mistakes, along with the potential for downtown improvement within the city of Las Cruces, New Mexico [PlaceEconomics]

DVD Landscape Tours Available at Drayton Hall: Drayton Hall in Charleston is offering an exciting new way to engage visitors within their mid-eighteenth century plantation grounds. Using tried and true interpretive methods coupled with new technology that allows visitors to receive audio/visual information on specific areas of the site, historical themes related to the historic site, and the preservation efforts necessary to maintain the grounds. [National Trust Historic Sites Weblog]

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

 

President Lincoln's Cottage Blog Turned 100 This Week: 100 posts, that is. To mark their centennial, the folks at the blog are listing off One Hundred Things to Know About President Lincoln's Cottage. [President Lincoln's Cottage Blog]

Ballpark Development: Planetizen takes a different look at the effects of stadium development upon neighborhoods and employment. [Planetizen]

Saving Wood Windows Means Saving Money and Energy: The Landmark Society of Western NY discusses the advantages of saving your old-growth wood windows. [Confessions of a Preservationist]

Montpelier Restoration Update: With their Grand Opening just around the corner, Montpelier's restoration team has been hard at work in and around James Madison's estate.[Montpelier Restoration Updates]

Turning Preservation into Art: Warehouses that store materials saved from historic properties can preserve key elements of architectural history. Two artists put their talent to use on items recovered from Spartanburg's Architectural Salvage store. [Preservation Trust of Spartanburg, Inc.]

Guthriesville General Store is Saved--For Now: The 140 year old building that once housed a Chester County, Pa. general store has been given 75 days to find a buyer before convenience store chain WaWa will take over and begin demolition. [Preservation Magazine]

New Historic Site Directors Appointed: Woodlawn Plantation and Pope-Leighey House--both located in Virginia--along with Chesterwood in Stockbridge, Ma. have appointed new directors. All three are National Trust Historic Sites. [National Trust Historic Sites] [National Trust Historic Sites]

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

It’s Rally Cap Time for Tiger Stadium

Posted on: July 11th, 2008 by Matt Ringelstetter

 

Tiger StadiumWednesday marked a sad day for a two-time member of the National Trust’s List of 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. Although demolition began in June, the most significant damage to Detroit’s Tiger Stadium began this week to the park that legends like Ty Cobb, Willie Horton, and Hank Greenberg once called home field. The stadium opened in 1912 and owed its unique design to the corner location on Michigan Avenue and Trumball Boulevard. In addition to its corner design, Tiger Stadium featured a signature 125 foot tall flagpole to the left of center field and an upper deck that overhung right field by ten feet.

The Stadium has played host to some of the most fabled moments of America’s sport, such as Babe Ruth’s 700th home run in 1934, the voluntary end of Lou Gehrig’s 2,130 consecutive game streak, and what is considered to be the longest confirmed home run in the history of the game—a shot by Ruth that traveled close to 600 feet on the fly.

Is there any hope for the ballpark? Or will it meet the same demise as Ebbetts, Comiskey, and Forbes? The Old Tiger Stadium Conservancy, a Corktown based non-profit, is trying to prevent just that, and is raising money to help save part of the historic stadium for use as a banquet hall, museum and office space. Time is running out, but the efforts of the Conservancy and others are in the right direction, and need all the help they can get.

Read Preservation Magazine's February article on "Detroit's Field of Dreams."

Hearts Break as Tiger Stadium Falls [Detroit News]

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.