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Preservation Magazine, September/October Issue

Join us on Wednesday, September 2, from 2:00-3:00 PM EST for a live chat about our redesigned and recently released September/October issue.

Join the editors of Preservation next Wednesday, September 2, from 2:00-3:00 PM EST for a live chat about our redesigned and recently released September/October issue.

Haven't seen it yet? Check the issue out online for the following articles and features (which we'll discuss on the chat):

To participate in the live chat, bookmark and then visit this web page next Wednesday at 2:00 PM EST. Worried you'll forget? You can sign up for an e-mail reminder there now.

When the chat starts, the floor will be yours to ask questions about our features, learn more about this issue's online extras, and get behind-the-scenes info about our redesign process. You'll also be able to discuss your favorite photos and articles, and let us know if you're going to visit any of the sites covered in the issue.

We promise to share all the surprises we've discovered. We can't wait to hear from you!

Learn more about next week's live chat with the editors of Preservation and sign up for a free e-mail reminder.

Margaret Foster is the online editor of Preservation magazine.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Ike in Indiana

Posted on: September 24th, 2008 by Margaret Foster

 

The Sullivan House, in Madision, Ind., was damaged by Hurricane Ike.

The Sullivan House, in Madision, Ind., was damaged by Hurricane Ike. (Credit: Historic Madison, Inc.)

Hurricane Ike hit Galveston, Texas with full force, and even its remnants had an impact on the Midwest. By the time Ike reached Madison, Indiana, it was only a tropical depression, but downed trees smashed many buildings in the city’s vast historic district, which includes 1,600 buildings in 133 blocks. And, like Galveston, this week Madison is still trying to pick up the pieces.

“Things are starting to reopen,” says John Staicer, executive director of Historic Madison, Inc., formed in 1960. Seven of the group’s 16 properties were damaged in the September 14 storm, but Historic Madison will reopen two of its house museums this week.

Incorporated in 1809, Madison is known for its intact downtown, which was designated a National Historic Landmark—the country’s highest honor—two years ago.

Named a Dozen Distinctive Destination in 2001, this Indiana town wrote the book on heritage tourism. During Madison’s down-and-out days, residents restored rather than demolished old buildings. “By the early 1900s Madison, because of its beauty and charm, was starting to attract tourists, and people started restoring,” Staicer says.

More on this story from Preservation magazine.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

SCAD Students Encourage Savannah to "Shop Local"

Posted on: September 8th, 2008 by Margaret Foster

 

Call it a senior project that lasted beyond graduation. A group of historic preservation students from Savannah College of Art and Design challenged their city to “shop local” on Labor Day weekend.

 

"In the spring we spent a quarter studying the benefits of shopping local, and we decided to stick around in the summer and take the knowledge and do something with it," says Chad Purkey, one of the six students who went door-to-door passing out postcards about the benefits of shopping at local stores.

 

For the class taught by Jeanne Lambin, former program officer at the National Trust’s Midwest Office, students devised a slogan ("It makes cents"), engaged the media, and launched a website with a survey and blog about Savannah's favorite shops. 

 

"We developed a lot of partnerships with different organizations in town who are really excited about the project," Chad says. "Local businesses help preserve local identity and character. We thought that was really important for Savannah because it’s this quirky place that has a lot of unique flavor. … We looked at the positives of local businesses; we never talked about the negatives of chain stores."

 

Visit the students' project at www.savlocal.weebly.com

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Saarinen's TWA Trumpet To Fall

Posted on: March 27th, 2008 by Margaret Foster

 

Saarinen’s TWA “trumpet” connected the now-lost terminals.Plans to save a unique section of Eero Saarinen's TWA terminal at John F. Kennedy International Airport have stalled on the runway.

The New York State Historic Preservation Office, and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, have approved JetBlue Airways' plan to demolish a 5,000-square-foot departure lounge known as "the trumpet." JetBlue demolished the other lounges and flight wings three years ago to make way for a new terminal, while retaining the iconic 1962 main terminal for future restoration.

JetBlue's decision was a surprise to some preservation groups, who met with JetBlue last year to discuss renovating the trumpet, which the Port Authority paid $895,000 to relocate last April.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

New York City Nightclub Protected

Posted on: March 25th, 2008 by Margaret Foster

 

Webster Hall, NYCA New York City nightclub has made it past the velvet ropes to city landmark status.

On Mar. 19, the New York City Landmarks Commission bestowed that designation to Webster Hall, built in 1886. The move may prevent the building from being torn down for 20- and 30-story dormitories and hotels, like several others on the same block.

"In the area where Webster Hall is, we've been losing a lot of historic buildings," says Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, which pushed for the designation. "On the same block, we lost a 19th-century church, St. Ann's, for a 26-story dorm. We did not want to see the same thing happen to Webster Hall."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.