Author Archive

 

The wood shakes on the house were deteriorating by the time Fenton purchased the property. He consulted with architects, fellow historic homeowners, and manufacturers of products designed for historic buildings in order to learn how to best repair them. He eventually stripped and re-stained each shake by hand.

It is said to be the largest Craftsman residence ever built, and now, after an extensive 25-year restoration, the three-story house in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles known as Artemesia is celebrating its centennial.

Built in 1913, Artemesia was designed by architect Frank A. Brown for the family of engineer Frederick E. Engstrum, whose father founded a major Southern California construction company.

After passing through the hands of several owners, the house sat largely neglected since the early 1940s, until advertising executive Leonard Fenton purchased the house in 1987 at the tender age of 23.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

The Race to Save the Last Piece of a City's Chinatown

Posted on: March 14th, 2013 by Lauren Walser

 

Exterior of China House. Credit: O.C. Lee

In Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., the only surviving remnant of the valley’s once-thriving Chinatown -- a two-story, c. 1919 house -- faces an uncertain future, and local preservation and Chinese American heritage groups are fighting to save it. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

The Soo Line ore dock in 2009. Credit: chief_huddleston, flickr
The Soo Line ore dock in 2009

As a young boy, John Chapple would clamber out onto the old ore dock stretching 1,800 feet from the shores of his hometown of Ashland, Wis., into Lake Superior, where he would join his siblings and cousins for an afternoon of fishing, swimming, and jumping off the dock’s lower levels.

“And sometimes, when we got reckless, the higher levels,” Chapple says with a laugh.

Chapple, like many Ashland residents, holds a vast collection of memories of this massive, 80-foot-tall structure, a local landmark since it was built in 1916. But today, as it is slowly being demolished by its current owners, Canadian National Railway, Chapple worries the ore dock will remain just that -- a memory.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Movie History Gets Top Billing at the Egyptian Theater in Los Angeles

Posted on: February 25th, 2013 by Lauren Walser

 

View of large crowd outside the Egyptian Theatre for a visit with Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford in 1922. A sign above the entrance reads," Doug and Mary Premiere tonight." Credit: Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection, Wikimedia Commons
View of large crowd outside the Egyptian Theatre for a visit with silent film stars Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford in 1922.

All eyes were on Hollywood Sunday night, as the biggest names in the film industry gathered at the Dolby Theatre for the 85th Academy Awards.

Among the stars lining Hollywood Boulevard, there was another celebrated icon a block away from the ceremony: the Egyptian Theater, a Tinseltown landmark since 1922.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Forging a Future for the Oswego Iron Furnace

Posted on: February 7th, 2013 by Lauren Walser

 

The restored Oswego Iron Furnace. Credit: Susanna Campbell Kuo
The restored Oswego Iron Furnace.

For more than a century, the Oswego Iron Furnace stood near the Willamette River in Lake Oswego, Ore., a fading relic to the city’s origins.

From its perch behind a chain link fence, its stones were falling, its brick arches were collapsing, and the surrounding landscape was overgrown, with plants growing out of the structure.

“We were growing increasingly concerned that the whole thing could collapse,” says local historian Susanna Campbell Kuo and member of the advisory board of the Lake Oswego Preservation Society.

And in 2002, when the city unveiled its plans to redevelop George Rogers Park, Kuo and several other residents noticed that there were no comprehensive plans to preserve the 44-foot structure.So they began researching, diving into the furnace’s -- and the city’s -- history, in order to learn more.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.