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Members of Historical Good, top row, from left: Kayleigh Travins, Margo Boland, Maggie Shoemaker, and Sophia Brady; bottom row: Bridget Brady. Not pictured: Jen Fox, who was away at camp. Credit: HistoricalGood.org
Members of Historical Good, top row, from left: Kayleigh Travins, Margo Boland, Maggie Shoemaker, and Sophia Brady; bottom row: Bridget Brady. Not pictured: Jen Fox, who was away at camp.

For a group of teenagers in Southborough, Massachusetts, summer vacation came with a mission: saving a 167-year-old mansion.

Known as the Burnett/Garfield House, the Second Empire-style stone structure at 84 Main Street was built c. 1847 as the home of businessman Joseph Burnett and his wife, Josephine. Burnett, an active town leader, created the first liquid vanilla extract commercially produced and sold in the United States.

When it was reported earlier this summer that the mansion’s current owner was considering selling it to a developer who would seek demolition, a group led by local teenagers Bridget Brady, 14, and Jen Fox, 15, rallied to save the 2 ½-story structure, which requires sizable repairs.

“Everything else is fixable,” Brady says, “but demolition isn’t.”

Late last month, in the wake of the group’s protests, the current owner decided not to move forward on the sale. The story isn’t over, though. A full renovation is estimated to cost upwards of $1.5 million.

But given the outpouring of local support to save the house, led in large part by this group of teenagers, the future of the house looks significantly brighter.

We spoke with Bridget Brady, who’s starting her freshman year of high school this fall, about the history of the Burnett/Garfield House and why she felt compelled to save it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Historic Bars] Prost! in Portland, Oregon

Posted on: July 31st, 2014 by Lauren Walser

 

PreservationNation continues its historic bars series with America’s takes on the beer-brewing bodegas that originally sprouted in the Fatherland. Today's last stop for this particular theme: Portland, Oregon.

The c. 1894 building at 4237 N. Mississippi Avenue had been boarded up and vacant for years before its restoration. Credit: Prost!
The c. 1894 building at 4237 N. Mississippi Avenue had been boarded up and vacant for years before its restoration.

It was the old-world, rustic charm that attracted restaurant owner Dan Hart to the modest, 120-year-old building on a street corner in Portland, Oregon’s historic Mississippi neighborhood.

But it’s the authentic German fare and liters upon liters of German beer that, today, draw thirsty Portlanders to Prost!, a friendly neighborhood beer garden.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

Three teenagers stand on the Tent of Tomorrow’s mezzanine platform, also made of steel. Credit: Bill Cotter
Three teenagers stand on the Tent of Tomorrow’s steel mezzanine platform.

World’s Fair sites were rarely built to last. Just a handful of relics of these international expositions remain in the United States -- among them, the New York State Pavilion in Queens, New York.

Built for the 1964-54 World’s Fair, the Space Age structure dazzled visitors with visions of an exciting future. And yet 50 years later, despite decades of neglect and deterioration, the futuristic pavilion still stands in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. How did it do it?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

HOPE Crew: Training the Next Generation of Preservationists

Posted on: July 3rd, 2014 by Lauren Walser

 

140703_blog_photo_HOPECrew_Hinchliffe_1_DuncanKendall
A HOPE Crew in Paterson, New Jersey, paints Hinchliffe Stadium in April.

As any preservationist knows, the task of caring for and maintaining historic sites is a never-ending one. With that in mind, the National Trust for Historic Preservation recently launched a new program called Hands-On Preservation Experience (HOPE) Crew to introduce preservation to the next generation.

HOPE Crew will provide practical, hands-on preservation training to thousands of young people and veterans through a partnership with The Corps Network, a national advocacy and support group for youth development programs that has more than 100 youth corps members. (Read more about HOPE Crew and its partnership with The Corps Network in the Summer 2014 issue of Preservation magazine.)

Each HOPE Crew will partner with local preservation craftspeople and a preservation adviser who will provide mentorship and training. The corpsmembers receive hourly wages for their work; the professionals who provide their expertise on each project receive compensation, as well.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

First HOPE Crew Project Revitalizes 75-Year-Old Stable

Posted on: June 17th, 2014 by Lauren Walser 3 Comments

 

Credit: Susana Raab
Members of the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia helped rehabilitate the Skyland Stable, built in 1939, at Shenandoah National Park earlier this year as part of the National Trust's HOPE Crew initiative.

When a crew of young members of the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia arrived at Shenandoah National Park’s Skyland Stable back in March, they knew plenty about construction, but not much about historic preservation.

Less than three months later, however, the once-dilapidated stable looked much as it did when it was built in 1939, thanks to the young corpsmembers who trained alongside preservation professionals to conduct a large-scale rehabilitation of the property.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.