Author Archive

JFK Airport's Pan Am Worldport: A Jet Age Relic In Peril

Posted on: February 15th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn 6 Comments

 

A Boeing 707-100 aircraft sits at the Worldport in 1961. Credit: John Proctor, Wikimedia Commons
A Boeing 707-100 aircraft sits at the Worldport in 1961.

The original architects of the Pan Am Worldport might have hoped that the building would fit in perfectly with the landscape of the new millennium.

The terminal at New York’s JFK Airport was built in 1960 by Ives, Turano & Gardner Associated Architects in the shape of a futuristic flying saucer. It made its mark on American cultural history by sending off the Beatles after their first U.S. tour and appearing in at least one vintage James Bond adventure. Pan Am shuttered its ticket windows in 1991, but the Worldport still serves as a reminder that air travel was once seen as an exotic luxury, rather than a nuisance-riddled necessity.

Although the Worldport is iconic, its current tenant, Delta Airlines, is planning to dismantle the structure, now known as Terminal 3, in 2015 to make way for a $1.2 billion expansion of neighboring Terminal 4. The original Worldport space will eventually be used as a parking lot for aircraft.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an editorial assistant at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

Professor Longhair’s house on Terpsichore St. in New Orleans. Credit: robbiesaurus, Flickr
Professor Longhair’s house on Terpsichore St. in New Orleans.

New Orleans bassist Reggie Scanlan describes the 1970s comeback of R&B piano legend Professor Longhair as “a convergence of a lot of happenstance things.” Professor Longhair had recorded a number of hits in the ‘40s and early ‘50s; his significant musical talent, however, couldn’t always pay the rent. But “Fess,” as he was affectionately known, was given a slot on the roster of the newly-minted New Orleans Jazz Festival in 1971, and was poised to do some of his best work to date.

“With the reemergence of Fess, we were all scrambling to find records,” says Scanlan, who was in his late teens at the time. “We had never heard anything like this.”

Longhair, whose given name was Henry Roeland Byrd, passed away in 1980, after releasing a new album and making plans to tour with The Clash. Restoration is currently underway on his dilapidated duplex on Terpsichore (TERP-sih-kor) Street in New Orleans, and the house’s comeback, once complete, may be just as impressive as when Fess took the stage in ’71.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an editorial assistant at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Preservation Vacation: Sag Harbor, A Close-Knit Hamptons Enclave

Posted on: January 17th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn 3 Comments

 

Sag Harbor Movie Theater. Credit: PamelaVWhite, flickr
Sag Harbor Cinema & Theatre on the town's Main Street

Sag Harbor, tucked into the South Fork on the easternmost end of Long Island, has always maintained its own unique identity amid the upscale allure of the Hamptons, thanks in part to its rich history. The community of Eastville was a prominent free African American settlement in the early-to-mid-1800s, a draw for adventurous men who wanted to try their luck at the whaling industry. Almost a hundred years later, starting in the late 1940s, the area began to enjoy a renaissance as an African-American vacation hotspot.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an editorial assistant at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

Stephanie Barber, president of the Hamlin Park Taxpayers & Community Association, hands the keys to Lyth Cottage over to Matthew Newton. Credit: David Torke, fixBuffalo
Stephanie Barber, president of the Hamlin Park Taxpayers & Community Association, hands the keys to Lyth Cottage over to Matthew Newton.

Matthew Newton first laid eyes on his dream house while browsing a list of buildings that the city government of Buffalo, NY was selling for $1.

Lyth Cottage was in grave disrepair, but Newton was able to look past the boarded-up windows and broken front steps to the structure’s former glory, when it served as a home for the servants of a terra cotta tile maven, Alfred Lyth, in the late 1800s.

“This was obviously a unique house, far different from all of the other ones,” Newton says. “I didn’t know where it was located really, and then I just decided I had to have it right away.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an editorial assistant at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.