Author Archive

Beloved WPA-Built Public Pool at the University of New Hampshire is Threatened

Posted on: December 16th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn

 

The pool has provided a place for community members to cool off for 75 years. Credit: Kenny Rotner, FUNHOP
The pool has provided a place for community members to cool off for 75 years.

“Magical” is how Kenny Rotner, a Durham, N.H. resident for 27 years, describes the outdoor pool at the University of New Hampshire. Built in 1938 by Civilian Conservation Corps workers and funded by the WPA, the roughly 44,000-square-foot body of water is one of the oldest public pools in the nation. With a floor of quarried local granite flecked with green and silver, the space has served as a one-of-a-kind spot for swimming lessons, socializing and summer fun for generations.

Recent concerns about whether the pool adheres to modern safety standards, however, have caused the University of New Hampshire to announce possible plans to dismantle it, pitting preservationists and community members against the UNH administration.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Saving Colonel Charles Young's Historic Birthplace in Mays Lick, Ky.

Posted on: November 22nd, 2013 by Katherine Flynn

 

Colonel Charles Young was born in this cabin in May’s Lick, Ky., in 1864. Credit: Bill Macintire, Kentucky Heritage Council

The cabin doesn’t look like much. Tucked into a stand of trees and covered in vines, its log walls and stone chimney slightly off-kilter, the neglected building has sat empty for years. But its humble appearance belies a big slice of history: In 1864 it served as the birthplace of Charles Young, an African-American colonel who fought discrimination to build a remarkable military career.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

Daniel Chester French was born in 1850 and was hailed as the “Dean of American Sculpture” during his lifetime. One of his first works was a bust of prominent Concord intellectual Ralph Waldo Emerson, cast here in bronze. (He also completed plaster and marble casts.) Credit: Concord Museum
Daniel Chester French was born in 1850 and was hailed as the “Dean of American Sculpture” during his lifetime. One of his first works was a bust of prominent Concord intellectual Ralph Waldo Emerson, cast here in bronze.

“All over the landscape, but kind of invisible.” That’s how Concord Museum curator David Wood describes sculptor Daniel Chester French, possibly the most famous artist you may never have heard of.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

A Prized Restoration: Saving Cincinnati's Pulitzer/Rauh House

Posted on: November 6th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

This International Style house was built in 1938 by Cincinnati architect John Becker for prominent insurance agent Frederick Rauh and his family. Credit: Jeffrey Jakucyk - Architects Plus
This International Style house was built in 1938 by Cincinnati architect John Becker for prominent insurance agent Frederick Rauh and his family.

In the March/April 2012 issue of Preservation magazine, we featured the inspiring story of Cincinnati’s 1938 Pulitzer House, a once-grand International Style home that was slated for demolition after suffering decades of neglect. Emily Rauh Pulitzer, the co-founder of the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts with her late husband, former St. Louis Post-Dispatch editor Joseph Pulitzer Jr., purchased the house in 2011 after she was contacted by local preservationists trying to save the structure.

Rauh Pulitzer grew up in the home, which was commissioned by her father. After paying to stabilize the historic house, the 79-year-old philanthropist donated it to the Cincinnati Preservation Association, along with the funds needed to complete a thorough, historically accurate restoration. It now looks almost exactly the way it did when she was a girl, with the added bonus of modern amenities like insulated glass windows and up-to-date electric and plumbing systems.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

Tenants in the Rice Mill Lofts are prohibited from altering the building’s original graffiti. Credit: Studio WTA Architects
Tenants in the Rice Mill Lofts are prohibited from altering the building’s original graffiti.

If you’ve ever longed to make your home in a century-old industrial rice mill amid preserved graffiti and masonry brick walls, New Orleans’ Rice Mill Lofts might be the perfect place for you.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.