Author Archive

 


Marquette University, a Jesuit college named for Father Marquette, was established in 1881.

In our summer 2015 issue of Preservation magazine, we highlight the historic charm of Marquette, Michigan, the biggest city in the state’s Upper Peninsula and one of the most architecturally significant. This place, however, isn’t the only one in the region to bear that moniker -- far from it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Celebrate 50 Years of Preservation In Denver’s Larimer Square

Posted on: June 19th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 2 Comments

 

Larimer Square was the site of Denver’s very first building, constructed in 1858.
Larimer Square was the site of Denver’s very first building, constructed in 1858.

Not every major city can point to the exact spot where it began, but Denver can.

That spot is Larimer Square, where settler and developer William Larimer and his son first built a 16-by-20-foot log cabin in 1858. After aggressively selling tracts of land to miners and other migrants to the Rocky Mountains, Larimer eventually saw the city of Denver incorporate in 1860.

Although the original cabin was torn down in 1861, the square still stands today as a testament to its namesake’s tenacity and pioneer spirit. There was a time in the 1960s, however, when the future of Larimer Square was threatened by Denver's Urban Renewal Authority, which was attempting to "modernize" the city's skyline. In 1963, preservationist and developer Dana Crawford stepped in to form the Larimer Square Association, eventually succeeding in saving the block-long row of buildings from demolition in 1965 and ensuring their survival into the 21st century.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Oak Alley Plantation, Host to Vampires and Beyoncé

Posted on: June 16th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 5 Comments

 

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The Oak Alley Plantation house was completed in 1839 and first restored in 1925.

In this summer’s upcoming issue of Preservation, we bring you the story of the Lombard Plantation house in New Orleans, one of the only surviving structures from the city’s 19th-century agricultural past. Period furniture and a plethora of original details, like hand-stenciled wallpaper and preserved pine floors, are just a few of the features that give the 1826 Creole-style home such a strong connection to the city’s heritage.

These remarkable historical characteristics were part of what made Hollywood location scouts single it out for the 2006 time-travel thriller "Déjà Vu," starring Denzel Washington. Its relatively modest footprint ultimately wasn’t big enough to accommodate the necessary camera equipment and crews, but set designers were able to recreate an exact replica of the house’s first floor in a New Orleans warehouse, creating an authentic backdrop for the film’s events.

While Louisiana does have tax incentives meant to entice filmmakers to the Pelican State, its unique historic architecture and natural beauty are photogenic enough to form the perfect setting for any unfolding fictional drama. One particularly popular filming location is Oak Alley Plantation in Vacherie, about an hour’s drive from New Orleans.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Buy a Guitar at Tupelo Hardware: The Americana Music Triangle, Part 2

Posted on: June 11th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn

 

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Memphis’ Beale Street is an 1.8 mile long stretch of blues clubs and restaurants in the city’s downtown.

A few weeks ago, we introduced you to the Americana Music Triangle, a 1,500 stretch of southern highway that encompasses the heart and soul of American music. We took virtual tours from New Orleans to Natchez and Vicksburg to Memphis, highlighting some of the museums, juke joints, and one-of-a-kind pit stops (like blues legend Robert Johnson's three gravesites) along the way.

Here, we’ve compiled recommendations from three more driving trails: Memphis to Nashville, Nashville to Muscle Shoals, and Tupelo back up to New Orleans (where the "Gold Record Road" began.) You’ll find gems like Jackson, Mississippi’s Historic Farish Street District, a hub for African-American businesses up until the end of Jim Crow, and the Rhythm Nightclub Memorial Museum, a Natchez spot memorializing a 1940 fire that killed visiting patrons and members of the Walter Barnes jazz band.

“The more I learn, the more I get excited about how much there is to learn about our music history,” says Americana Music Triangle founder Audrey Preston. “I kind of woke up one day and realized it’s really right on our back yard here – the roots of the music that is the popular music of the world.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Follow the Gold Record Road: The Americana Music Triangle, Part 1

Posted on: May 29th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn

 

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This sculpture in Congo Square, New Orleans, pays homage to the enslaved workers who gathered there on Sundays to sell goods, dance, and play music.

The Americana Music Triangle is a stretch of land between Nashville, Memphis and New Orleans where a swirl of cultures and influences helped to form no fewer than nine uniquely American genres of music: blues, jazz, country, rock n’ roll, R&B/soul, gospel, southern gospel, Cajun/zydeco, and bluegrass. It includes the hot, swampy marshland that gave birth to the Delta Blues and the legendary recording studios of Nashville and Memphis that launched the careers of countless American icons like B.B King, Elvis and Johnny Cash. It’s a place that will tell you almost anything you want to know about the roots of American music, if you know where to look -- and listen.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Four More California Wineries With Rich Histories

Posted on: April 20th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn

 

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Wine being barrel-aged at the Gundlach Bundschu winery.

In the Spring 2015 issue of Preservation magazine, we feature the stories of three well-aged and much-loved Northern California wineries that have weathered historical calamities to continue producing award-winning libations into the present day. There are so many others whose stories we didn’t get the chance to tell, so we thought we’d take this opportunity to do so.

Gundlach Bundschu, Freemark Abbey, Inglenook and Beringer Vineyards are all known for their rich viticultural history. Sit back, pour a glass of your favorite vintage, and read on to find out more about how each vineyard got its start and endured setbacks such as Prohibition and the 2014 Napa Valley Earthquake.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.