Author Archive

[Historic Bars] The Mint Bar in Sheridan, Wyoming

Posted on: October 2nd, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Fans of the giggle water get to celebrate hooch in a big way this month as Preservation Nation covers blind pigs and juice joints – a.k.a. speakeasies -- as part of our historic bars series. First up: The Mint Bar in Sheridan, Wyoming.

The Mint Bar has been in operation since 1907.
The Mint Bar has been in operation since 1907.

Our collective memory of Prohibition, the roughly decade-long period in America's history when the manufacture, sale, and distribution (but not the consumption) of alcohol was forbidden, is rife with images of liberated flappers, hopping speakeasies, and decadent parties.

But Prohibition wasn’t all giggle water and dancing the Charleston; the American economy was damaged when thousands of jobs in alcohol-related industries were slashed, and a thousand people per year died, on average, from the years of 1920 to 1933 from drinking tainted bootleg liquor. The FDR-backed Prohibition repeal, ratified in 1933, was an exceedingly popular decision, bringing to a close what was known by temperance groups as “The Noble Experiment.”

While many bars across the nation were forced to close during the years of Prohibition, many more operated undercover as speakeasies, or places to partake in illegal hooch. The Mint Bar in Sheridan, Wyoming, was one such establishment.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] The Holler House in Milwaukee

Posted on: September 18th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Preservation Nation continues its tour of historic bars as we slide (or stumble) our way into the musty dugouts that have served as the home bases for sports fans across the nation as they ride the bench and cheer their favorite teams. Next up for America’s historic sports bars: the Holler House in Milwaukee.

Milwaukee’s Holler House is home to the nation’s oldest certified bowling alley.
Milwaukee’s Holler House is home to the nation’s oldest certified bowling alley.

Speaking as a Midwestern native, I can tell you firsthand that the farther north you drive out of Chicago, the harder-pressed you’ll be to find a fancy watering hole. Wisconsin bars in particular pride themselves on their sticky floors and loud, bone-rattling jukeboxes; they’re spots to commiserate with friends and neighbors over pitchers of beer and baskets of greasy onion rings fried to perfection. Milwaukee’s Holler House, located in the city’s historically Polish South Side and owned by the Skowronski family since 1908, perfectly embodies the grittiness -- and greatness -- of this uniquely Midwestern variety of tavern.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Q&A with Sherry Williams of the Bronzeville Historical Society

Posted on: September 15th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn 6 Comments

 

A photo of a Pullman Porter on display during a 2009 exhibit on the Great Migration at Pullman’s Hotel Florence.
A photo of a Pullman Porter on display during a 2009 exhibit on the Great Migration at Pullman’s Hotel Florence.

While the historic neighborhoods of Pullman and Bronzeville in Chicago’s South Side are 11 miles apart geographically, they are linked by a common industrial thread. Pullman, a company town established by businessman George Pullman in 1880 to house workers in his Pullman Palace rail car factory, was segregated, and the company’s numerous African-American employees were relegated to the not-so-nearby community of Bronzeville. Some made the trek to the factory every day, while others did laundry or prepared food in Pullman-owned buildings in Bronzeville.

With legislation pending for Pullman to be designated as a National Park site, history buffs in Bronzeville, like Sherry Williams, the president of the Bronzeville Historical Society, are advocating for their community’s rich history to be included in the story told at Pullman. I spoke with Williams about the Great Migration, the role that African-American workers played at Pullman, and her own personal connection to Bronzeville.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Vernacular Architecture, One Exposure At A Time

Posted on: September 10th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Little Cabin Inn, Newburgh, NY. Originally an open-air fruit stand, the 1920s-era Little Cabin Inn has gone through stints as a tavern, a restaurant and vacation lodgings, and was owned and operated by the same family until its closure.
Little Cabin Inn, Newburgh, New York. Originally an open-air fruit stand, the 1920s-era Little Cabin Inn has gone through stints as a tavern, a restaurant, and vacation lodging, and is still owned and operated by the same family under the name Haven Coffee & Espresso Bar. 

In our Fall 2014 issue of Preservation magazine, we highlight a body of work shot by veteran photographers Steve Gross and Susan Daley over a period of several decades. As prolific fine art and commercial photographers, much of Gross and Daley’s output during their 30-year career has focused on historic houses, gardens, and interiors.

But while criss-crossing the country to shoot far-flung locations ranging from New Mexico to Louisiana to the Catskills, the duo were compelled to photograph the many unassuming buildings dotting the American landscape -- emblems of vernacular architecture.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

This Labor Day, Celebrate Chicago’s Pullman Historic District

Posted on: August 29th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn 3 Comments

 

Founded in 1880, Pullman was America’s first planned community. Credit: Cynthia Lynn
Founded in 1880, Pullman was America’s first planned model industrial community.

Labor Day: one last chance for beach vacations, barbecues, and making the most of summer’s warm weather before the autumn chill sets in. What many Americans probably don’t realize, however, is that the origins of this holiday weren’t nearly as idyllic.

As it so happens, the roots of Labor Day are closely tied to one of our National Treasures, Chicago’s Pullman National Historic District.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.