Author Archive

 

141124_blog-photo_church-turned-restaurant_terrapin
Guests can dine beneath cathedral ceilings at the former First Baptist Church -- now Terrapin Restaurant -- in Rhinebeck, New York

In the Fall 2014 issue of Preservation we brought you our first roundup of churches-turned-restaurants, following it up shortly thereafter with a blog post featuring even more heavenly cuisine. In case your prayers still weren't answered, here are three brand-new selections sure to please the palates of even the most devout food-lovers.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar in New Orleans

Posted on: November 20th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Did George Washington really sleep here? In our next round of Historic Bars, we're stopping at the crossroads of time and history to explore old taverns and inns around the country -- the kind with wooden signs, rooms for lodging, and a century (or two) of fascinating stories. Next in line: Lafitte's Blacksmith Shop Bar in New Orleans.

Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar is estimated to have been built between 1722 and 1732.
Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar is estimated to have been built between 1722 and 1732.

A powerful purple “voodoo” drink and a healthy dose of pirate history are just two great reasons to visit Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar, located on New Orleans’ storied Bourbon Street.

Hailed as possibly the oldest bar in the United States and most definitely the oldest building currently in use as a bar, Lafitte’s is housed in a French-built structure that dates from roughly 1722 -- the details, like so much of New Orleans lore, are sketchy.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] The Old Talbott Tavern in Bardstown, Kentucky

Posted on: November 6th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

Did George Washington really sleep here? In our next round of Historic Bars, we're stopping at the crossroads of time and history to explore old taverns and inns around the country -- the kind with wooden signs, rooms for lodging, and a century (or two) of fascinating stories. First in line: The Old Talbott Tavern in Bardstown, Kentucky.

The Old Talbott Tavern was originally built in 1779 and claims the title of the “world’s oldest bourbon bar.”
The Old Talbott Tavern was originally built in 1779 and claims the title of the “world’s oldest bourbon bar."

Come for the bourbon, stay for the ghosts.

The Old Talbott Tavern in Bardstown, Kentucky, may be the world’s oldest bourbon bar and one of the earliest western stagecoach stops in America, but according to local lore, the 1779 inn is also haunted. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] The Mint Bar in Sheridan, Wyoming

Posted on: October 2nd, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Fans of the giggle water get to celebrate hooch in a big way this month as Preservation Nation covers blind pigs and juice joints – a.k.a. speakeasies -- as part of our historic bars series. First up: The Mint Bar in Sheridan, Wyoming.

The Mint Bar has been in operation since 1907.
The Mint Bar has been in operation since 1907.

Our collective memory of Prohibition, the roughly decade-long period in America's history when the manufacture, sale, and distribution (but not the consumption) of alcohol was forbidden, is rife with images of liberated flappers, hopping speakeasies, and decadent parties.

But Prohibition wasn’t all giggle water and dancing the Charleston; the American economy was damaged when thousands of jobs in alcohol-related industries were slashed, and a thousand people per year died, on average, from the years of 1920 to 1933 from drinking tainted bootleg liquor. The FDR-backed Prohibition repeal, ratified in 1933, was an exceedingly popular decision, bringing to a close what was known by temperance groups as “The Noble Experiment.”

While many bars across the nation were forced to close during the years of Prohibition, many more operated undercover as speakeasies, or places to partake in illegal hooch. The Mint Bar in Sheridan, Wyoming, was one such establishment.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] The Holler House in Milwaukee

Posted on: September 18th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Preservation Nation continues its tour of historic bars as we slide (or stumble) our way into the musty dugouts that have served as the home bases for sports fans across the nation as they ride the bench and cheer their favorite teams. Next up for America’s historic sports bars: the Holler House in Milwaukee.

Milwaukee’s Holler House is home to the nation’s oldest certified bowling alley.
Milwaukee’s Holler House is home to the nation’s oldest certified bowling alley.

Speaking as a Midwestern native, I can tell you firsthand that the farther north you drive out of Chicago, the harder-pressed you’ll be to find a fancy watering hole. Wisconsin bars in particular pride themselves on their sticky floors and loud, bone-rattling jukeboxes; they’re spots to commiserate with friends and neighbors over pitchers of beer and baskets of greasy onion rings fried to perfection. Milwaukee’s Holler House, located in the city’s historically Polish South Side and owned by the Skowronski family since 1908, perfectly embodies the grittiness -- and greatness -- of this uniquely Midwestern variety of tavern.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.