Author Archive

[Historic Bars] The Dakota Inn Rathskeller in Detroit, Michigan

Posted on: July 17th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn 2 Comments

 

PreservationNation continues its historic bars series with America’s takes on the beer-brewing bodegas that originally sprouted in the Fatherland. Today's stop: Detroit.

140716_blog_photo_DakotaInn1_MarkinDetroit
The Dakota Inn Rathskeller was founded by German immigrant Karl Kurz in 1933.

When is the absolute best time to pay a visit to the Dakota Inn Rathskeller in Detroit? That’s a tough one.

It could quite possibly be on Friday and Saturday nights, when the rafters shake with the sounds of diners belting traditional German tunes, backed by a live band or piano; or maybe it’s during the restaurant’s annual spring Maifest celebration, when Weissbier flows freely amid impromptu conga lines. It could even be in the summer, when the Inn hosts a chili cook-off in the backyard biergarten.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[11 Most Endangered] Mokauikaua Church in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

Posted on: July 8th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn No Comments

 

Credit: David Casteel
Mokuaikaua Church was built in 1837 by Hawaii's first Christian missionaries. 

The ohia wood rafters in the sanctuary of the Mokauikaua Church in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, have been sheltering worshipers since 1837, when King Kamehameha II gave Hawaii's first Christian missionaries his blessing to build the structure just a stone's throw from the ocean.

Mokauikaua -- 177 years later -- has become immeasurably valuable in not only giving residents of Kailua-Kona on Hawaii’s Big Island a beautiful place to meet and worship, but also in helping to tell the state’s unique story. Pastor David de Carvalho, the 31st to serve at the church, estimates that it welcomes about 400 people every Sunday, an even split of regulars and tourists eager to experience a service in the Aloha State's oldest house of worship.

That’s why, in light of structural damage from a 6.6 magnitude earthquake in 2006 and a slew of problems due to typical wear-and-tear in Hawaii's tropical climate, the National Trust decided to grant the church a place on its 2014 list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Pharmacies-Turned-Restaurants: The Cure for What Ails You

Posted on: June 30th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Credit: W.A. Frost & Co.
W.A. Frost & Company prides itself on serving seasonal, organic, locally sourced cuisine. 

If only you could get a doctor to write you a prescription for a meal in a refurbished pharmacy-turned-restaurant -- you'd feel better in no time. In the Summer 2014 issue of Preservation magazine, we highlight three such eateries: the Gryphon Tea Room in Savannah, Ga., housed in the city’s 1926 Scottish Rite Building; the Hillside Farmacy in Austin, Texas, named for the 1920s drugstore that occupied the same space; and Tonic at Quigley’s in Washington, D.C., located in the circa-1891 Quigley’s Pharmacy.

There are several more around the country, however, that could also do the trick -- consult our handy guide below.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

In this round of our historic bars series, we travel to the American frontier of Alaska to a little spit of land to take a look at the Salty Dawg Saloon.

Credit: Cissy Rockett, Salty Dawg Saloon
The log cabin that houses the Salty Dawg was built in 1897. 

If you’ve never been to the Homer Spit, off Homer, Alaska, or heard of a drink called a Duck Fart, you might need to make tracks for the historic Salty Dawg Saloon. Housed in a 117-year-old cabin that has served the town in various capacities as a railroad station, grocery store, and post office, the Salty Dawg, which opened in 1957, is beloved by tourists and locals alike.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Preserving an Artistic Legacy at Guerneville, Calif.’s Pond Farm

Posted on: June 16th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

140611_blog_photo_PondFarm_Photo1_JanetLGracyk
The barn at Pond Farm served as a teaching space and studio for renowned ceramics artist Marguerite Wildenhain.

Students learn by doing. That’s the philosophy that midcentury artist Marguerite Wildenhain used in her ceramics workshops at art schools all over the country, and especially at her home studio of Pond Farm in northern California. Wildenhain was known for never allowing her students to keep a pot, insisting that the learning was in the process, not the finished piece.

“They were learning steps -- like the ABCs,” says Dorothy Herger, 89, an artist and former student of Wildenhain’s, of her approach to students’ work. “They weren’t there to clutter your life.”

A new exhibit at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, titled "Designing Home: Jews and Midcentury Modernism," highlights the work of Wildenhain and other Jewish Midcentury Modern artists and designers, featuring furniture, textiles, architecture and handcrafted objects, and putting both the artists and their work in the context of the larger movement.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.