Author Archive

 


Rebecca Buntrock observing roof construction at the UVA Jefferson's Rotunda, part of her work as a preservation engineer at Robert Silman Associates.

Usually when people have a big fix-it project on their to-do list, they borrow tools and supplies. At the National Trust, we borrow preservation engineers.

Meet Rebecca Buntrock, our 2012 Robert Silman Fellow for Preservation Engineering. This six-month position is sponsored by Rebecca's employer, Robert Silman Associates (RSA), a firm known nationwide for their special expertise in the engineering of historic buildings, with notable preservation projects including the Guggenheim, Fallingwater, and Ellis Island.

During her tenure at the National Trust, Rebecca worked closely with our Historic Sites department on cool projects at a number of sites, including:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

Open for Business Again at Pittsburgh's Market Square Place

Posted on: December 12th, 2012 by Julia Rocchi 9 Comments

 

Several years ago, Market Square Place was just a series of historic buildings on three different streets with different styles and heights, all suffering from decades of neglect. Some saw this as a case for demolition, but the City of Pittsburgh saw an opportunity to promote green urban living.

A public-private partnership brought the historic buildings together into a single mixed-use complex that now boasts residences, retail storefronts, and a YMCA, all with facades that have been restored to their original 1930s appearance. This successful reinvention as a fresh, eco-friendly community earned Market Square Place an Honor Award at the 2012 Richard H. Driehaus National Preservation Awards -- and the approval of the surrounding neighborhood.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[10 on Tuesday] 10 Steps to Establish a Local Historic District

Posted on: December 11th, 2012 by Julia Rocchi 2 Comments

 

Today’s local preservationists are big-picture thinkers. They’re not looking only at landmarks; they’re also thinking about their community’s whole environment, development history, sustainability, and politics. And one great way to protect a place’s history, culture, and values is to establish a local historic district.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

Meeting Lincoln Through the Emancipation Proclamation

Posted on: November 28th, 2012 by Julia Rocchi 1 Comment

 

The historical drama Lincoln, now in theaters, brings the 16th president's fight for the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery to the big screen -- and with it a certain amount of celebrity status for Honest Abe. But is it the full story?

To find out, we turned to President Lincoln's Cottage, one of the National Trust's Historic Sites. The modest home in Washington, DC, served as Lincoln’s family residence for a quarter of his presidency during the summers of 1862, 1863, and 1864 -- and he was living there when he developed his Emancipation Proclamation in 1862, an important part of the timeline leading to the 13th Amendment.

Now the Proclamation has come home to roost (in a manner of speaking): The Cottage is the first public venue to display a rare, signed copy of the historic document recently purchased by David Rubenstein. It's on display now through the end of February 2013 to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Proclamation's signing.

To better understand this exhibit's significance -- and the document's impact on the course of history -- we checked in with Erin Carlson Mast, the director at the Cottage, to ask her some timely questions.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

Homeowners face some of the most cutting impacts of natural disaster: physical displacement, loss of property, financial uncertainty, and stress. And as Superstorm Sandy just proved, you can never take too many precautions ahead of a natural disaster.

But what if you own a historic property? Are there additional steps you should be taking? And what resources are available to you, the historic property owner, in the disaster’s wake?

Fortunately, there’s a wealth of information out there to help historic property owners minimize the impact to their building as well as strengthen their building’s resistance to extreme wind, rain and other climatic forces. This week’s toolkit compiles the essential steps you can take before and after the storm.

In coming weeks we’ll build on these principles and share specific tips for preparing, planning, and responding to a variety of natural disasters -- including hurricanes, floods, fires, and earthquakes. But for now, let’s start with the basics.


Storm Damage from Hurricane Sandy, Beverley Square West, Brooklyn, NY. Photo courtesy Chris Kreussling (Flatbush Gardener on Flickr)

Before the Storm

1. Create a disaster preparedness plan for your home or property ahead of time. Following a checklist in times of crisis can help focus your attention and keep you from missing important details. Check out this hurricane preparedness example from the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.

2. Check your insurance coverage. Older and historic properties often use materials or building techniques you can’t easily replicate today, which makes insurance companies far less likely to cover damage. A great option for insuring historic homes is National Trust Insurance Services (a National Trust subsidiary). NTIS can help value your property and ensure sufficient protection. Visit their website to learn more.

3. Print important information and documents ahead of time. Disasters often cause power outages and service disruptions, so in this wired age of computer and smartphone reliance, it’s helpful to have critical info already at your fingertips.

After the Storm

4. Secure your property. Your two most important tasks immediately following a hurricane are: a) ensure the safety and security of people working on site, and b) keep valuable or important building fabric from the debris heap. Saving architectural fragments, building materials, decorative plaster, etc. can help with restoration later.

5. Call your insurance company and register with FEMA. File a claim with your insurance company as soon as possible. If your area was included in a national disaster declaration, you’ll then want to register and file apply for assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Guidance, housing assistance, and more can be found at FEMA’s Disaster Recovery Centers after a national disaster.


Damage from Superstorm Sandy in Arlington, VA. (Photo courtesy Arlington County, via Flickr)

6. Call your state historic preservation office (SHPO) and local preservation commission. Your SHPO can answer questions about your historic property, direct you to the appropriate state and local resources, and help you navigate any confusing processes. If your property is protected as part of a local historic district or locally landmarked, make contact with the local commission early -- before proceeding with demolition or repairs to parts of the property that may be under the commission’s review.

7. Assess the damage. It usually costs less to repair or renovate a disaster-damaged house than to re-build. Before gutting your property (or deciding to demolish), contact your SHPO or statewide preservation organization to find contractors with proven expertise in historic buildings, who can walk through your property with you and help determine the scope of the damage.

8. Make a list. Inventory what was damaged or lost on your property (especially useful in cases of total destruction). Having an inventory will also help with your contractor bids and insurance claims later.

9. Compile repair bids. Figure out exactly what needs to be done, write it down, and walk through your house with contractors to get a ballpark estimate. If it sounds reasonable, request an item by item detailed bid. Try to get three bids based on the exact same work. (And remember to verify the contractor’s state license number and insurance.)

10. Investigate financial resources. Your property might qualify for any number of federal, state, and local funding programs, including grants, loans, and historic tax credits. Your SHPO can help direct you to the programs that best fit your property and its repair needs.

You can find more disaster recovery information on PreservationNation.org. You can also visit DisasterAssistance.gov.

Has your historic property weathered a natural disaster? Tell us about your experiences in the comments.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.