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Catch National Preservation Conference Highlights Online

Posted on: October 11th, 2011 by Julia Rocchi 3 Comments

 

Ah, the joy of the Interwebz -- allowing us to connect across the miles and delve deeper into our shared love of preservation at the National Preservation Conference! Though we much prefer to have you see the Nickel City for yourself, we understand if you couldn't make it in person this year, and we still want you to be involved from your corner of the world.

This year we are featuring conference highlights on several channels:

  • Right here on the PreservationNation blog. We have the great good fortune this year to have students from Columbia University's Historic Preservation program acting as our roving reporters for the conference. Watch the blog for timely posts and vlogs featuring their on-the-ground view.
  • Twitter. National Trust staffers and our #builtheritage chat friends will be busy bees capturing the most salient session points in 140 characters on Twitter. Watch the hashtag #PresConf (or the official @PresConf account) for the latest news and notes. And if you tweet, by all means, join in!
  • Facebook. Keep an eye on the PreservationNation Facebook page for announcements, photos, updates, and more.
  • Flickr. A picture is worth a thousand blog posts, and believe me, Buffalo is one photogenic town. Check in periodically to our Conference Flickr group and see exactly what attendees are seeing as they traverse the city.
  • Buffalo Unscripted. This summer, a team from the National Trust hit the streets of Buffalo to tell the real story of a city that everyone seems to have an opinion about – whether they live there or not. Now we're debuting footage from the project at an interactive public screening event during the conference. Learn more about the project and watch the videos on the project's Tumblr.

Of particular note: We're livecasting the plenaries and general sessions on Ustream! Here's the schedule:

  • Opening Plenary (with keynote speaker James Howard Kunstler)
    Wednesday, Oct. 19
    4-6 pm EST
  • General Session: Preservation in the Age of Sustainability
    Thursday, Oct. 20
    8-9:30 am EST
  • General Session: Thinking about Shrinking
    Friday, Oct. 21
    8-9:30 am EST
  • Closing Plenary (with keynote speaker Isabel Wilkerson)
    Saturday, Oct. 22
    10:30 am-12 pm EST

You can catch these livestreams -- as well as links and feeds for all the other sites I mentioned -- on the National Preservation Conference homepage. Thanks for joining us there!

Julia Rocchi is a member of the National Trust's Digital and New Media team. She's up to her eyeballs in pixels at the conference.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

Central Terminal greets a new day in Buffalo. (Photo: Jason Clement)

Ah, summer ... the glorious season where you're traveling for vacation, thinking about vacation, or picking up work for others on vacation. Either way, you're occupied, so we just wanted to send up a flare and remind you that early bird registration for the National Preservation Conference ends THIS SUNDAY, July 31.

Yes, I know, we're asking you to think three months in advance when you probably haven't even considered your next meal. But trust me, you want to lock in your spot now. Here are three reasons why, pulled from a jam-packed program:

  • James Howard Kuntsler. This author, blogger, critic, artist, and provocateur will welcome the National Preservation Conference to Buffalo and to his home state of New York at the Opening Plenary Session.  An expert on cities and a vocal opponent of suburban sprawl, Kuntsler won’t mince words about the economy, the environment, and how good planning and preservation can work together to save our communities -- if given the chance.
  • Isabel Wilkerson. She spent most of her career as a national correspondent and bureau chief at The New York Times, is the first black woman to win a Pulitzer Prize in the history of American journalism and was the first black American to win the Pulitzer for individual reporting. Inspired by her own parents’ migration, she devoted fifteen years to the research and writing of the book The Warmth of Other Suns. She interviewed more than 1,200 people, unearthed archival works and gathered the voices of the famous and the unknown to tell the epic story of the relocation of an entire people. (And you'd miss this?)
  • Buffalo itself. Wow. Just ... wow. Preservation magazine's in love with it. The Buffalo Unscripted team's in love with it. And we're pretty certain you'll fall in love with it too. Register now for your chance to experience a city on the rise.

Besides, if you register now, you save big. And that means more money for ice cream while you're on vacation.

Thanks for joining us!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

Sustainable Communities In Every Sense

Posted on: June 17th, 2011 by Julia Rocchi

 

Here at National Trust HQ we recently celebrated Go Green Week, an event designed to deepen staffers' knowledge about green office practices and environmental issues. As part of our education, we had the chance to meet Nora Johnson and Danielle Arigoni from the Office of Sustainable Communities (OSC) at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). They joined us over lunch to talk about the interagency partnership between HUD, DOT, and EPA, and what it means for creating sustainable communities in every sense of the word.

Formerly known as the Smart Growth program, OSC takes a holistic view to community development. It combines tenets from smart growth -- such as walkability, open space, and transportation -- with those of environmentalism, like protection and conservation. The resulting livability principles touch on everything from land use and design to climates and water. No stone (literally) is left unturned.

As Arigoni put it, “communities are our main clients," and she outlined her office's three key strategies for serving them:

  1. Change the conversation. This includes a new comprehensive website (www.sustainablecommunities.gov), talks, and awards to spread the gospel about sustainable communities. One great example is their Greening Historic Communities Symposium, which just happened this week in Wilmington, Delaware.
  2. Work with the willing. In their goal to be as responsive as possible to communities, EPA partners with a variety of organizations and agencies to offer analysis and technical assistance. Program examples include Smart Growth Implementation Assistance, Greening American’s CapitalsSustainable Communities Building Blocks, and Governor’s Institute for Community Design.
  3. Change the rules. OSC is working within the regulatory framework to achieve their goals -- and advocating for change when necessary. For example, the EPA is focusing right now on the community-focused International Green Construction Code (IGCC) and fighting against proposals that weaken the code from an environmental standpoint.

A prime example of all these strategies coming together is OSC's ongoing preservation-related work in Concord, New Hampshire. National Trust staffer Kimberly Kooles covered the project in detail earlier this year -- get your refresher course here.

If you're looking to accomplish similar work in your area, be sure to check out the grants listings on the OSC site, as they have both new and improved funding options available to eligible communities. And if you want to learn more about preservation's intersection with sustainability in general, take a minute to browse our blog posts on the subject and our Sustainability section on PreservationNation.org.

So from our community to yours -- Happy (belated) Go Green Week! Good luck with all your greening goals.

Julia Rocchi does content, marketing, and web-monkeying for the Digital + New Media team. Her favorite part of the inaugural Go Green! Week (besides this talk, of course) was the office supply swap, in which she was able to give a neglected 3-hole punch a new lease on life.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

By now, you're probably familiar with scenes of energetic volunteers learning how to hammer, new one-story homes rising up in mere weeks, and first-time homeowners receiving keys. It's all due to the work of Habitat for Humanity, the international nonprofit organization dedicated to building simple, affordable houses for families in need.

A restored Habitat for Humanity home in Newburgh, NY. (Photo: Pepper Watkins)

What you may not know, however, is that some Habitat affiliates are augmenting the traditional 'new build' model with rehabilitations and renovations -- and along the way, doing preservation as well.

Take, for example, Habitat for Humanity of Greater Newburgh. Located 60 miles north of New York City along the Hudson River, this affiliate has acquired dozens of abandoned homes from the City of Newburgh and turned them around with the help of thousands of volunteers. (For the full story, check out their case study featured in the National Trust's Habitat for Humanity Preservation Toolkit.)

This approach not only takes advantage of the city's available housing stock, but it also retains the character and history of the community -- a perfect dovetail to Habitat International's  Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative, which expands the organization's products, services, and partnerships to serve more families and better tailor solutions to each community's needs.

Of course, there are a lot of lessons learned along the way, and Newburgh has stockpiled some excellent advice on how to make rehabs work in other communities. In this video, Habitat Newburgh staffers and volunteers share their top tips:

We applaud Habitat for Humanity of Greater Newburgh for their continued dedication to thoughtful rehabilitation, and hope they inspire other affiliates around the country to investigate if rehabs can support their local efforts too.

For more case studies and information, please visit the Habitat for Humanity Preservation Toolkit.

Julia Rocchi is an Online Content Provider for the National Trust's Digital + New Media team. She thinks that the opportunity to film this amazing project was totally worth getting stuck in a snowstorm on the way home.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

Main Street + Preservation: Daily Debrief from Des Moines, Day 3

Posted on: May 25th, 2011 by Julia Rocchi

 

You've heard that Main Streets are the future. You've heard the call to grown your entrepreneurial spirit. And today -- the last day of the 2011 National Main Streets Conference -- you'll hear how Main Street can influence and contribute to the preservation movement.

National Trust President Stephanie Meeks delivered the closing plenary, and her theme was how Main Street can help achieve the "dynamic, visible, broadly inclusive movement" we envision. Here are some of the highlights:

  • Last year the Trust recognized Main Street Iowa’s leadership with an Honor Award, and we’re so pleased to be here in Des Moines to help you celebrate your 25th anniversary and mark the remarkable achievement of $1 billion in private investment raised.
  • We’re tremendously grateful for all you’ve done to support this event, especially the record number of in-kind contributions you’ve raised. Your success is a testament to the credibility and partnerships you’ve developed in the state over the past 25 years.
  • As Main Street leaders, all of you are ambassadors for preservation in your local communities, doing the work day in and day out that it takes to build a preservation ethic and create a network of local activists who understand the connection between preservation and economic development.
  • So our first challenge is to make preservation more accessible to people—to build an even broader grassroots movement ... we’ve learned is that one group in particular, the local activists, are of central importance in our efforts to build the movement.
  • It is one of my goals in this job to shift the perception of preservation, to make people inside and outside the field think of us as the ‘movement of yes’ rather than no. My hope is that the Trust’s work on this at the national level will support your efforts at the local level, so that it’s easier for you to make the case in your communities.
  • The Trust is working in partnership with preservationists and advocates at the state level to defend important preservation funding sources, including Main Street programs.
  • Main Street programs offer some of the most compelling proof that preservation works as a tool for economic development—and a very efficient, cost-effective one at that.

Watch the full video of the Closing Plenary here:


Webcam chat at Ustream

General Session

The second General Session focused on "Overcoming Challenges to Growing Your Community." Watch the video for terrific advice from veteran Main Street managers Jeanine Rann, Cristina Sheppard-Decius, and Doris Tillman.


Video streaming by Ustream

Education Sessions

There was just one education session slot today, but a lot of interesting options. Here's what we covered:

  • "What Makes That Building Special? Learning How to 'Read' the Buildings Along Main Street." Presenter: Molly Myers Naumann, architectural historian. (on @PresConf)
  • "Cheap Rent Isn't Always Cheap: Thinking Like a Downtown Property Owner." Presenter: Diane Williams, Business Districts, Inc. (on @estewartdc)
  • "Pop-Ups: Would They Fit On Your Main Street?" Presenter: Kennedy Smith, Community Land Use and Economics Group. (on @NatlMainStreet)

Our Favorite Tweets

Today's tweets almost all quote from Main Street managers, who have a lot of advice and encouragement for their counterparts around the country. Thank you to everyone who tweeted their notes and feedback throughout the conference!

  • @PresConf Tillman: Want to shock your community? Put in a roundabout.
  • @PresConf Tillman: Raising money is like going for a colonoscopy. Who really enjoys it?
  • @PresConf Audience member: When I don't believe in myself, I believe in this program.
  • @NatlMainStreet Sheppard: Dont ever be afraid to ask someone in the [Main Street] network how to do something. Someone has already done it somewhere.

Aaaand ... that's it. Conference is over, and we're on our way home. Please join us next year in Baltimore to celebrate your community and learn from the network!

Julia Rocchi is representing the National Trust's Digital + New Media team at the 2011 National Main Streets Conference.  She has eaten more pie in the last three days that she consumed in the entire year previously.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.