Author Archive

 

New name, new format ... but same helpful content! Our 10 on Tuesday series has undergone a facelift, making it easier to read and cooler to peruse. Now called Preservation Tips & Tools, this ongoing segment will continue to share the info you need to save places in your community. Enjoy -- and share!

Adapted from the article “Nine Practical Reasons to Save Old Buildings” by Jack Neely

What is historic, and worth saving, varies with the beholder, but some definition is urgent. Simply put, “historic” means “old and worth the trouble.” It applies to a building that’s part of a community’s tangible past. And to a degree that may surprise cynics, old buildings can offer opportunities for a community’s future.

This article examines both the cultural and practical values of old buildings and looks at why preserving them is beneficial not only for a community’s culture, but also for its local economy.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

Heart Bombs 2014: Five Events that Showed Historic Places the Love

Posted on: February 20th, 2014 by Julia Rocchi 1 Comment

 

Heart-bombing the Sattler Theatre in Buffalo. Credit: Buffalo's Young Preservationists
Heart bombing the Sattler Theatre in Buffalo

Heart bombing: an idea born of love, affection, and untold amounts of construction paper. It’s a bright, beautiful way to spotlight historic buildings, and this February, groups around the country wore their feelings on their sleeves for the places that matter to them.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

The National Register Rap: Meet the Minds Behind the Music

Posted on: February 10th, 2014 by Julia Rocchi 2 Comments

 

Sam Crystal, Katie DeCecco, Nate Dawes, and Carol Vinatieri. Credit: Grumpy Group
Sam Crystal, Katie DeCecco, Nate Dawes, and Carol Vinatieri: the group behind the "National Register Rap"

When the National Register Rap dropped in early December 2013, it went "preservation viral" -- as in, everyone who's ever navigated the National Register (NR) process immediately recognized and shared the funny (and useful) video.

We caught up with the masterminds behind the rap -- Nate Dawes, Katie DeCecco, Carol Vinatieri, and Sam Crystal, all historic preservation students at the University of Mary Washington -- to learn how they put it together, what they'd like people to discover about the National Register, and what their personal plaques would say.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[10 on Tuesday] How Artists Can Help Interpret History

Posted on: January 7th, 2014 by Julia Rocchi 2 Comments

 

It’s a constant question for people in the preservation community: How can we make museums and historic sites most relevant to the communities they serve? The Sandy Spring Museum in Sandy Spring, Maryland, had a creative solution. Literally, creative. The museum opened its doors to cultural artists -- visual, literary, and performing -- who create new works inspired by the Museum’s historic collection or the history of the area.

We spoke with Allison Weiss, Sandy Spring’s executive director, to learn how the museum approached its reinvention, what happened as a result, and what tips other places can take away from Sandy Spring’s success.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[10 on Tuesday] 10 Steps for Restoring Historic Theaters

Posted on: December 31st, 2013 by Julia Rocchi 9 Comments

 

PreservationNation blog readers love historic theaters with a capital LOVE, reading and liking and commenting in overdrive whenever we share a restoration or reuse story. And really, what’s not to love? Theaters evoke wonderful memories of experiencing art, enjoying architecture, and spending time with loved ones.

Plus, historic theaters are proven community revitalizers and economic drivers. Not only do they generate an impact of at least $2-$3 per dollar spent on tickets, but they also catalyze other business development, create jobs, and improve the local quality of life.

But restoring a historic theater is no small undertaking. In fact, the average historic theater project costs between $5 and $30 million, opens in 5 to 10 years from inception, and requires dozens of consultants. In this toolkit, we share the essential steps in bringing a historic theater back to life so it can be the site of many more happy memories to come.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.