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Change You Can Upload

Posted on: December 8th, 2008 by Jason Clement

 

Use our policy platform for the incoming administration to make a case for preservation on President-Elect Barack Obama's new Web site, www.change.gov.

Use our policy platform for the incoming administration to make a case for preservation on www.change.gov.

"What began twenty-one months ago in the depths of winter must not end on this autumn night. This victory alone is not the change we seek - it is only the chance for us to make that change. And that cannot happen if we go back to the way things were. It cannot happen without you."

That was the booming call to action delivered by President-Elect Barack Obama in his election night acceptance speech - an event that was attended by thousands and experienced by many, many more through Twitter alerts, Facebook updates, a live Web feed and podcast, a Flickr slideshow, and a follow-up YouTube video that has been streamed 3,942,523 times and counting.

Really, if this election taught us anything, it's that having a strong web presence has become an indispensible component of American politicking - right along side of appearances on Sunday morning talk shows, photos ops in local bowling alleys and diners, and rallies where John Mellencamp is turned up just a little bit too loud. So, as politicians and the strategists who love them continue to tinker with widgets and feeds, how can we best use these new avenues to advance our mission to protect and preserve? To quote President-Elect Barack Obama, how is the Internet our "chance to make...change?"

The National Trust for Historic Preservation has developed a policy platform for the incoming administration that outlines how preservation - when integrated into economic, energy and climate change policies - can not only protect the places that matter most, but also lead to more livable, sustainable and economically viable communities. As our public policy department works hard to get this document front and center with members of the transition team, we invite you to explore the online version and then take our message to www.change.gov, where President-Elect Barack Obama is soliciting stories and policy ideas from the many millions of people he engaged throughout the election.

Now is the time for our voice and our ideas to be heard, and one of the keys to our success can be summed up by tweaking an infamous election-season sound byte: It's the Internet, stupid.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

Breaking News: BLM Announces Lease Deferrals in Nine Mile Canyon

Posted on: December 4th, 2008 by Jason Clement 1 Comment

 

Left in the dust? Industrial truck traffic caused by lease sales threatens rock art in Nine Mile Canyon.

Left in the dust? Industrial truck traffic caused by lease sales threatens rock art in Nine Mile Canyon.

Plans change, and yesterday they started to change in our favor.

In a blog post on November 7, 2008, we reported that the Bureau of Land Management was reviving plans to sell oil and gas leases in wilderness areas in eastern Utah before the end of the year - a project that could include tens of thousands of acres in and around Nine Mile Canyon. As many of you know, Nine Mile Canyon is an unparalleled cultural resource with over 10,000 rock art images on more than 1,000 panels. Projects like these threaten the canyon's irreplaceable resources due to the ever increasing dust, chemical suppressants and vehicle emissions associated with industrial truck traffic.

Despite the fact that the December 19 target date for the lease sale is inching closer and closer, an important announcement yesterday demonstrates that it is not too late to take a step in the right direction.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation both commends the Bureau of Land Management for deferring eight of the approximately twenty leases planned for sale in and near Nine Mile Canyon, and urges the agency to continue to make decisions that protect the at-risk resources. The deadline for objections to the lease sale is today, and, as noted in a Salt Lake Tribune article that ran yesterday, the National Trust for Historic Preservation will be filing an official protest (which will be available online soon) arguing for deferrals for the sensitive tracts below the canyon's rim that remain on the lease list.

The lease list will be finalized by December 12. As we continue to monitor this sale and report on critical changes, we invite you to visit our Nine Mile Canyon page to learn more about our work in the resource-rich region and to download a lease sale map released yesterday by the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

Off Roading on the Grand Staircase?

Posted on: November 21st, 2008 by Jason Clement

 

1.7 million acres of "one of a kind." Photo courtesy of BLM.

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (Photo: BLM)

As preservationists, "one of a kind" is a language we live by. Unfortunately, it's not a language that everyone understands or even tries to learn.

Created in 1996 by President Bill Clinton, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is a 1.7-million-acre expanse of resource-rich land that covers any road map of southern Utah almost entirely in green. Spanning eons of time, the Grand Staircase is a much-studied sequence of sedimentary rock (some formations ranging in age from 600 million to 2,000 million years) featuring multicolored cliffs, plateaus, mesas, buttes, pinnacles and canyons. Overall, over 4,000 cultural sites have been recorded within the monument, even though only 3% of the land has been surveyed.

Sound like a good place to go off roading? Believe it or not, it's happening.

This week, the National Trust’s Legal Defense Fund filed an amicus curiae ("friend of the court") brief in the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals in support of The Wilderness Society's successful challenge to Kane County's actions to open roads closed by the Bureau of Land Management (the agency that manages this unique monument) within the Monument. The lower court held that Kane County’s attempt to make decisions contrary to BLM's road decisions violated the Constitution. BLM closed numerous routes within the Monument to motor vehicles specifically to protect natural and cultural resources from the adverse effects of off roading.

Visit the Public Lands Initiative page to learn more and to download a copy of the brief, and stay tuned over the coming weeks as we continue to fight for what is truly "one of a kind" in southern Utah.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

Priorities for President-Elect Barack Obama: Our Voice Makes the News

Posted on: November 10th, 2008 by Jason Clement

 

BarackObama.com)

President-Elect Barack Obama (Photo: BarackObama.com)

Though we're still 71 days away from his inauguration, President-Elect Barack Obama is attending his first-ever meeting in the Oval Office today to discuss with President Bush the enormous challenges he faces after he is sworn in.

Today’s meeting at the White House shows how President-Elect Obama is intensively preparing to lead the nation. In fact, shortly after wining this historic election, his transition team launched a new website to seek feedback from the American people on their visions for his presidency.

We had a similar idea with our priorities poll, but focused through the lens of preservation. The good news? People are noticing.

Just this weekend, the Boston Globe published a front-page article examining how a campaign run on the premise of change has inspired groups across the country to reach out to the new administration and let the President-Elect know about their priorities. The National Trust for Historic Preservation was featured in the story's lead paragraph.

Labor unions want President-elect Barack Obama to move quickly on universal healthcare and to make it easier for workers to organize. Latino advocacy groups want immigration reform. Even the National Trust for Historic Preservation is urging Obama to seek full federal funding 'to protect our heritage.'

As we prepare our official public policy agenda for Congress and the Obama Administration, we want to ensure that the voices of preservationists in the trenches around the country remain a part of the ongoing conversation about this important transition.

If you haven't already, please take our poll of preservation priorities for President-Elect Barack Obama and consider joining the PreservationNation readers who have left comments about important role that stewardship and heritage plays in their communities.

And remember, sharing your perspective with us is just as important for our work on Capitol Hill, too. On November 17th, Congress will reconvene for a brief "lame duck" session to focus on stimulating the economy. Keep checking in with us, as we plan to post our analysis of the post-election Congressional landscape as it relates to historic preservation. There are a lot of developments you need to know about that will affect our agenda and our grassroots message to lawmakers on Lobby Day in March.

Stay tuned, because "change" is huge.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

Speak Up On Going Green

Posted on: November 6th, 2008 by Jason Clement 3 Comments

 

Speak Up: Sustainability and historic preservation go hand in hand because __________ .

From changing the way they get around (Prius, anyone?) to changing the way they shop (do you have your reusable grocery bag yet?), people are going green everywhere you look. It should therefore come as no surprise that a movement so ubiquitous is increasingly infiltrating our field.

This week, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the Friends of the National Center for Preservation Training and Technology are convening 30 leaders in the historic preservation and sustainability fields at the Rockefeller Brothers Pocantcio Center in Tarrytown, NY, to discuss the three-way intersection of sustainable practices, historic preservation and public policy.  

Dubbed Sustainability & Historic Preservation: Making Policy, the overall goal of this meeting of the minds is to develop the core elements of a Sustainability and Preservation Charter. In acknowledging the inherent contributions of preservation to sustainability, this charter will call for the integration of sustainability principles into preservation policy and practice in such a way that is consistent with the values of our movement to protect and restore. 

So, while the thought leaders and subject matter experts discuss the details and policy nuances, we want to hear from you: Sustainability and historic preservation go hand in hand because...

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.