Author Archive

Grand Central Terminal Arrives at 100 Years in Grand Style

Posted on: February 1st, 2013 by Gwendolyn Purdom

 

Main hall at Grand Central Terminal. Credit: New York Transit Museum

Beneath the soaring Beaux Arts arches and star-speckled ceiling of the main concourse, New York’s iconic Grand Central Terminal has welcomed and bid farewell to scores of travelers, as well as its fair share of controversy, for decades. Ten decades to be exact. Today, the National Historic Landmark kicks off a year-long centennial celebration, 100 years after opening its doors and tracks. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Remembering Architecture Critic Ada Louise Huxtable

Posted on: January 9th, 2013 by Gwendolyn Purdom

 

"On Architecture" by Ada Louise Huxtable.

The built environment lost one of its pillars this week when renowned architecture critic and ardent preservationist Ada Louise Huxtable passed away Monday at age 91. As the first full-time architecture critic for a daily American newspaper, Huxtable won the first Pulitzer Prize ever awarded for distinguished criticism in 1970, seven years after she joined the New York Times staff in 1963. In recent years, her writing appeared in the Wall Street Journal.

“Ada Louise Huxtable was one of the earliest and most consistent champions of preservation and the need for humanity in architecture,” says National Trust Executive Vice President and Chief Preservation Officer David J. Brown. “Her thoughtful perspective, along with her witty and sometimes sharp tongue, made her a force to be reckoned with in the field of planning, urban design, and preservation -- and a must-read for New Yorkers. She will be missed.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[SLIDESHOW] How Preservation Transformed Two Small Towns in Kansas

Posted on: December 26th, 2012 by Gwendolyn Purdom 3 Comments

 

For our upcoming winter issue of Preservation magazine, I had a chance to travel to rural Plainville and Hays, Kansas, where I spent a few days with entrepreneur Chuck Comeau, the founder of Dessin Fournir and a designer who has been buying up empty historic storefronts and reviving them to house his luxury furnishings business and other ventures for nearly 20 years.

The magazine didn’t have enough pages to include all the cool pictures photographer Jason Dailey took of these now-vibrant communities, so we’ve put together a slideshow for you with some of the shots that didn’t make it to print. Enjoy!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

 

Soldiers of the 442nd regiment. Credit: National Archives and Records Administration

For actor George Takei, the experience of returning to the relocation site where he and his family, along with thousands of other Japanese Americans, were interned during World War II was a moving one -- especially when he visited the memorial to Japanese American veterans in the former camp’s cemetery.

The names etched in the tank-shaped monument, Takei told us in an interview for our upcoming issue of Preservation magazine, represent “young men who went from behind American barbed-wire fences to fight with amazing heroism. The 442nd regimental combat team is the most decorated unit to come back from the entire Second World War. The American flags that covered their coffins were delivered back to their parents or their wives still imprisoned. The irony of that was just unbearable.”

The approximately 14,000 men who served in the 442nd segregated unit earned more than 4,000 Purple Hearts, 20 Medals of Honor, and an unprecedented seven Presidential Unit Citations -- and yet, as Takei pointed out, their story often goes untold. Through preservation and education efforts, groups across the country are trying to change that.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Viva La Concha: Mod Motel Recast as Las Vegas' Neon Museum

Posted on: December 14th, 2012 by Gwendolyn Purdom 1 Comment

 

Original La Concha Motel postcard. Date and photographer unknown.
Original La Concha Motel postcard. Date and photographer unknown.

They say what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas, but when it has come to keeping the city’s glittering architectural history in place in recent decades, that adage has often been overlooked. So the October opening of the 1961 La Concha Motel’s dramatic lobby as part of the city’s Neon Museum after years of preservation efforts is an especially remarkable triumph.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.