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Today marks the launch of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month.

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Kalaupapa Peninsula on the Island of Moloka’i

As we look forward to celebrating Asian and Pacific Island culture in America, we begin today with some good news about federal legislation - proposed and passed - that will provide much-needed resources for the preservation of sites of Japanese internment during World War II.

In March, the federal Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 appropriated $1 million for the preservation of Japanese American confinement sites. Administered by the National Park Service, this funding will support the interpretation, protection and restoration of these historic places.

Also in March, President Barack Obama signed into law the Omnibus Public Lands Management Act of 2009 , which includes over 160 bills related to public lands, national parks, historic sites and battlefields, conservation and wilderness designation, national heritage areas and corridors, and historic trails.

Receiving broad, bipartisan support in both the U.S. House and the U.S. Senate, this milestone legislation establishes a memorial in Kalaupapa National Historical Park, which is located on the island of Moloka’i in Hawai’i. The primary story being told at Kalaupapa National Historical Park is that of the forced isolation from 1866 until 1969 of people from Hawai'i afflicted with Hansen's disease (leprosy).

Also included in the Omnibus Public Lands Management Act of 2009 is the authorization of a special resource study of the Tule Lake Segregation Center in Modoc County, California, to determine the suitability and feasibility of establishing a new unit of the National Park System. Tule Lake is the site of one of the largest and most controversial Japanese American internment camps. It is also the only camp that was turned into a high-security segregation center. In December 2008, President George Bush declared the site part of the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument.

On April 23, Senator Dan Inouye of Hawai’i introduced legislation to have the Secretary of the Interior conduct a study to determine if internment camp sites in Hawai’i are eligible for designation as National Park sites. The legislation focuses on sites identified in a report completed in 2007 by the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai’i, including Honouliuli Gulch, Sand Island, the U.S. Immigration Station on Oahu, the Kīlauea Military Camp on the Big Island, Haiku Camp and Wailuku County Jail on Maui, and the Kalāheo Stockade and Waialua County Jail on Kauai. The National Trust for Historic Preservation partially funded archaeological studies at Honouliuli Gulch in 2008, and recently signed a letter of support to Senator Inouye (with six cooperating organizations) in favor of the new legislation.

- Denise Ryan & Elaine Stiles

Denise Ryan is the program manager for public lands policy at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Elaine Stiles is a program officer in the Western Office of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Make a Weekend Out of Partners in Preservation

Posted on: April 30th, 2009 by Guest Writer

 

National Preservation Month begins tomorrow. What better way to celebrate than by visiting a few Partners in Preservation sites in Greater Boston?

This coming Saturday and Sunday, all of our 25 participating historic places are opening their doors to the public for free or reduced admissions to prove why they deserve your vote.

Going beyond their usual schedule of tours, many of the sites have planned special events just for this weekend. Between boat building demonstrations, a klezmer concert, arts and crafts activities, African drumming classes, historical reenactments, sea chantey performances, and a midnight carousel ride, there will definitely be something for everyone. We also highly encourage you to check out the great deals on restaurants and lodging near each site offered exclusively by American Express, and to use MBTA or Zip Car to travel between destinations.

So please, come out and catch the Partners in Preservation excitement, whether you visit one site or make a day of it. Just don't forget to vote for the places that you like the best!

Not from Boston? Can't make it to the events? We've got you covered! For updates about this weekend’s events as they unfold, become a fan of Partners in Preservation on Facebook. And if one weekend of preservation excitement just isn’t enough for you, learn more about all the other ways we’re celebrating National Preservation Month.

- Alissa Anderson

Alissa Anderson is an intern at the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Northeast Office in Boston.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Portland: Achieving Sustainability One Demolition at a Time?

Posted on: April 29th, 2009 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Written by Val Ballestrem

It’s no secret that Portland, Oregon has long prided itself as a forward-thinking city in terms of the environment, and maybe that’s deservedly so, at least in some respects. But there is one aspect of the sustainability equation that the city fails to address effectively: demolitions. Sure, from time to time we see great press coverage about some building or house that is being deconstructed. Even a few notables, like the Ladd Carriage House and the Simon Benson House, have been moved, and some fantastic buildings have been adaptively re-used. But for every building in Portland that is deconstructed, moved, or re-used, untold numbers are simply smashed to bits.

For the most part, demolitions face little review or public scrutiny in Portland. In fact, the City’s Bureau of Development Services is not even required to notify residents of impending demolitions, unless the building is on the National Register of Historic Places or is a locally designated landmark. Even then, most buildings can still be torn down after a demolition delay period. This means that the average homes and buildings that make up the fabric of our older neighborhoods can be taken down with zero public input or notification. Compounding the problem are the state’s owner consent laws, making it nearly impossible to halt demolitions, especially when the endangered building does not have officially recognized historic significance. The problem then is twofold. Without notification it is nearly impossible to save something that no one knows is endangered. Second, even if one knew of a pending demolition there is in most instances no legal mechanism to keep it from happening. The net result is that one day you might be walking by a house in your neighborhood, the next you might find it ripped to shreds. It is frustrating and sad to see this happen, and seems especially disingenuous when supported by public policy and a city that espouses its intentions to be the “most sustainable” in the world.

Case in point, just the other day I was walking to work and came across a house in mid-demolition phase. It was not even 9 a.m. and the contractor had already chewed up (literally) more than half of a modest, circa 1890, house in southeast Portland, just across the street and outside the borders of one of the city’s most notable historic districts – Ladd’s Addition. The huge pile of debris that was once someone’s home certainly didn’t fit my idea of recycling in any realistic way. In the rubble were windows, doors, trim, interior moldings, bricks from the foundation, etc… much of which was (prior to demolition) in usable condition. At the very least I thought the property owner was short-sighted for not recognizing that the house could have been renovated. But what really raised my blood-pressure was finding out later that this perfectly solid home was torn down – in order to simply build another single family residence. Where is the sustainability in demolishing one residence to simply construct another? I understand some houses need rehabilitation, but a city that supports a “demolish first” mindset is also supporting an enormous waste of resources, energy, and further contributes to global warming.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Teaching Preservation: Lessons from the Field

Posted on: April 24th, 2009 by Guest Writer

 

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Notes from the Teacher's Desk

Greetings, PreservationNation!

It’s been a few weeks since my last update (the move to our new digs has, of course, been fraught with technical difficulties), and man oh man do I have some exciting news to report.

First order of business: Potters Field.

Last week, Bryan R. blogged about his research of the families buried in this mysterious section of Good Hope. His piece solicited the following comment on the National Trust's Facebook page (where everything you read here gets fed):

This is wonderful. Not only are younger students getting an invaluable introduction to conducting historical research, they are also being introduced to one of the most neglected and often overlooked historical landscapes - the American cemetery. Potters Field in particular provides an especially complex set of issues. I think it's great to see them tackled like this.

I couldn’t agree more.
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Just a few of the old records my students have used to tell the story of Good Hope. Click for a larger view.

Our last two blogs on Potters Field (here and here) are what Research History is all about. The students got out of the classroom and experienced first hand what it means to put together a puzzle and tell history. In doing so, they learned that things are not always as they appear, and they used a variety of sources (from interviews to old ledgers like the one you see here) to figure it all out.

Another lesson from Potters Field has been a simple one about people. The word “pauper” (the bulk of those buried in Potters Field) is definitely not a part of teen lexicon these days, so that was a conversation in itself. The students were a little shocked to learn that certain people were actually buried without headstones. It was an interesting day in the classroom that day.

So, did we fully solve the mystery of Potters Field? Maybe not. Did the students get a learning experience unlike anything they would ever have in a classroom? Absolutely.

And now for the big news…

A couple of weeks ago, Jeremy M. blogged about our work to secure funding for a historical marker for Good Hope. I’m very pleased to inform you that we received word this week that we won a $2,000 grant to make this happen. Definitely more to come on that front, so please stay tuned!

- Paul LaRue

Paul LaRue teaches Research History at Washington High School in Washington Court House, Ohio. The ultimate “hands-on” classroom experience, his course takes students into the field to learn about preservation and community service. Stay tuned for what's left of this academic semester as Paul and his students document their project at Good Hope Cemetery here on our blog and on their Flickr photostream. Also, keep an eye out for future “Notes from the Teacher’s Desk” columns from Paul himself.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Denise Ryan

I’m a little embarrassed to admit this, but getting a home energy audit has been on my to-do list for at least three years. So what got me moving? What got me to face the “inconvenient truth” that my house leaks like a sieve.

The answer: guilt, a growing concern about global warming, and my public policy co-worker, Patrice Frey.

Patrice leads the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Sustainability Initiative, which recently launched the Preservation Green Lab in Seattle to preserve (sustainably, of course) older and historic buildings. Now, it probably won’t surprise you that we do “talk shop” at work. Thanks to these water cooler conversations, it wasn’t long until I was sufficiently inspired to, as Mahatma Gandhi would say, “be the change [I] wish to see in the world.”

As a first step, I visited Angie’s List, an independent website that provides hundreds (maybe thousands) of reviews for service companies in D.C. and beyond. I’ve had great experiences with them looking for everything from plumbers to pet sitters, so I logged on and searched for an energy audit company. And that’s how I found Pascale Maslin with Energy Efficiency Experts, an expert/entrepreneur who conducts all of the audits herself. Much to my surprise, we were able to schedule an audit just one week later. No chance to backslide now; we were moving ahead.

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Pascale prepares my front door for the blower test, which helped us track down leaks and drafts.

Now for some background on my house. Built in 1956 and located in Cheverly, Maryland, it’s a detached, three-level Cape Cod with three bedrooms, two baths and a full basement. In addition to some high bills, I’ve got very little attic insulation, original windows, an old furnace, an old air conditioner, and an odd temperature discrepancy between the main floor and the upper level. I’ve done some starter improvements here and there (installed a programmable thermostat, replaced light bulbs, put a blanket around my hot water heater, etc.), but I knew that nothing would compare to the expertise of a professional home energy audit.

On audit day, the first thing Pascale did was conduct a blower door test, which sucks all of the air out of the house so that drafts, holes and cracks are easier to detect. She built a custom frame around my front door and inserted a shockingly powerful fan through an elasticized hole. Once she flipped the switch, we (very systematically) walked the entire house checking for air coming through any and everything. Among other things, we found a leak in my fireplace’s flue vent and a good size hole around the pipe under my kitchen sink. Oh, and the door to the basement was a veritable wind tunnel! What was that about?

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.