Author Archive

 

Written by Annie Gray Dixon, National Trust Intern

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Henryton State Hospital in Eldersburg, Md., is a focus of Speak Up For Buildings, a preservation nonprofit started by high school student Madeline Feierstein.

Whether it be insane asylums or old family homes, preservationists are all connected through their one common cause: love of preserving the past, one building at a time. Now, one young preservationist has made it her mission to save historic places by spreading awareness of buildings that have been neglected and are in danger of demolition.

Madeline Feierstein, a senior at Walter Johnson High School in Bethesda, Maryland, started her own nonprofit organization, Speak Up For Buildings, to “address historic preservation concerns.” Her focus right now: Henryton State Hospital, located in Eldersburg, Maryland.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Chris Warren for Preservation magazine

Solar panel installation at Mystic Seaport Collections Research Center. The brick parapet is visible in the background. Credit: Mystic Seaport
Solar panel installation at Mystic Seaport Collections Research Center. The brick parapet is visible in the background.

As covered in the Summer 2013 issue of Preservation magazine, it would be hard to come up with a more high-profile and historically significant place to install solar panels than Alcatraz Island in the San Francisco Bay. But as the price of solar panels and equipment continues to fall and people generally get more comfortable with this source of clean energy, it no longer requires a large chunk of federal dollars (which was the case with Alcatraz) and years of effort for historic buildings to tap the sun to meet their electricity needs.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Jessica Coscia

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Tropical hues on Spanish colonial homes of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico

I was five when we moved to paradise. Equipped with a couple of suitcases, my mother and I left our home in northern Virginia to embark on a new adventure in Puerto Rico -- “La Isla del Encanto” (The Island of Enchantment), with its picturesque white sand beaches, aqua blue ocean water, exotic animals, tropical climate, and the only rainforest in the United States.

It may seem worlds away, but Puerto Rico has been an American territory for over fifty years. And when I think of my own childhood there, I immediately remember the places and experiences there that helped shape who I am today.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

By Linda Feagler, senior editor of Ohio Magazine

Ohio Auditorium restored. Credit: PlayhouseSquare Archives
Ohio Auditorium restored

Critics called him crazy.

Even well-wishers who offered Ray Shepardson sincere support couldn’t believe the school administrator’s crusade to preserve four historic theaters in Cleveland, Ohio, could possibly succeed.

But it did -- and then some.

Today, Shepardson’s once improbable effort is Cleveland’s crown jewel: His rescue not only initiated the world’s largest theater restoration project (totaling some $100 million), it transformed that quartet of crumbling venues into a revitalized PlayhouseSquare, one of the largest performing-arts complexes in the country (second only to New York’s Lincoln Center).... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

North side of Sugar Pine Bridge. Half Dome is viewed through the trees at left rear.
North side of Sugar Pine Bridge. Half Dome is viewed through the trees at left rear.

Last year we added the bridges of Yosemite Valley to our 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list and our National Treasures portfolio out of concern for how the National Park Service’s plan to manage the Merced River would impact the historic Rustic-style stone bridges that span the river. Despite our ongoing advocacy efforts, earlier this year the National Park Service released a draft plan calling for the demolition of the beloved Sugar Pine Bridge and 100 other historic structures in the Yosemite Valley Historic District.

Photographer Brian Grogan generously agreed to share with us some of his gorgeous photos of Yosemite’s bridges and his thoughts about their importance to the park’s landscape. Take a minute to be dazzled by these bridges’ rustic simplicity, and then send a message to the National Park Service that urges their stewardship of these precious structures.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.