Author Archive

 

Written by Katherine Malone-France, Director of Education, Outreach, & Support, Historic Sites Department

The crowd gathers for the Boogie in a open space ringed by historic buildings and pecan, oak, and sassafras trees. Credit: Katherine Malone-France
The crowd gathers for the Boogie in a open space ringed by historic buildings and pecan, oak, and sassafras trees.

When I was growing up in Alabama, we often passed through the small town of Waverly as we travelled along Highway 280 on the way to Auburn football games. I remembered the town primarily for its cemetery with a distinctive stone wall and a collection of small frame houses close to the road.

I had not been through Waverly in years, but, at the end of September, I was fortunate enough to spend a perfect fall day there at an event called the Old 280 Boogie. The Boogie is an outdoor concert that brings together all kinds of people -- musicians, music lovers, artists, and entrepreneurs -- to enjoy, enliven, and be inspired by this historic town in east central Alabama.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Mike Rea, President and CEO of Tourism Cares

Tourism Cares volunteers help restore the authentic timber palisade surrounding the 17th-century English village at Plimoth Plantation. Credit: Kane Collective and Green Castle Video
Tourism Cares volunteers help restore the authentic timber palisade surrounding the 17th-century English village at Plimoth Plantation.

Like hundreds of volunteers in the historic town of Plymouth, Massachusetts, Belinda Brewster "feels the weight of history" to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower’s transatlantic voyage and final landing.

"It’s not simply a celebration of Plymouth for Plymouth," she says. "It’s a celebration of Plymouth for the nation."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Andy Grabel, Manager, Public Affairs

From historic power plants to breweries to schoolhouses, the adaptive reuse potential of old buildings is seemingly limitless. Today’s toolkit features tips to help you promote reuse in your own community as well as several examples of successful reuse projects.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Ric Cochrane, Project Manager, Preservation Green Lab

Seattle restaurateur Tom Douglas; food at his restaurant Lola. Credit: Tom Douglas; conjunction3, Flickr
Seattle restaurateur Tom Douglas; food at his restaurant Lola.

“Buildings have a temperature,” Tom Douglas says, sitting at the bar of his popular restaurant, Lola, one of ten in his Seattle food empire. “Old buildings are warm. Many new buildings are ice cold. I’m not talking about temperature -- I’m talking about intimacy. People want to eat good food in intimate spaces. New is rarely warm.”

To Douglas, intimacy means local character, the story of a place that adds to the experience of eating his famous food. He says old buildings often come with stories built in: “I love new buildings -- they’re much easier [compared to renovating old buildings]. But they don’t tell stories.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

League Park: Ohio's Lost Ballpark Gets Back in the Game

Posted on: September 20th, 2013 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Written by Jeremy Feador, University Archivist, Ritter Library, Baldwin Wallace University

Outside League Park in Cleveland, between 1900-1910. Credit: Library of Congress
Outside League Park in Cleveland, c. 1900-1910.

Nestled on the corner of East 66th and Lexington Ave are the remnants of Cleveland’s League Park. To say that this plot of grass, remaining ticket house, and partial wall of the park are historic is an understatement.

In 1891, when a 24-year-old Cy Young stepped on the mound for the inaugural game at League Park, he ushered in a period of baseball history that can hardly be rivaled. That day he helped lead the Cleveland Spiders to victory over Cincinnati, 12-3.

Eight years later in 1899, the team set a mark that may never be equaled in baseball history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.