Author Archive

 

Written by Andy Grabel, Manager, Public Affairs

From historic power plants to breweries to schoolhouses, the adaptive reuse potential of old buildings is seemingly limitless. Today’s toolkit features tips to help you promote reuse in your own community as well as several examples of successful reuse projects.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Ric Cochrane, Project Manager, Preservation Green Lab

Seattle restaurateur Tom Douglas; food at his restaurant Lola. Credit: Tom Douglas; conjunction3, Flickr
Seattle restaurateur Tom Douglas; food at his restaurant Lola.

“Buildings have a temperature,” Tom Douglas says, sitting at the bar of his popular restaurant, Lola, one of ten in his Seattle food empire. “Old buildings are warm. Many new buildings are ice cold. I’m not talking about temperature -- I’m talking about intimacy. People want to eat good food in intimate spaces. New is rarely warm.”

To Douglas, intimacy means local character, the story of a place that adds to the experience of eating his famous food. He says old buildings often come with stories built in: “I love new buildings -- they’re much easier [compared to renovating old buildings]. But they don’t tell stories.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

League Park: Ohio's Lost Ballpark Gets Back in the Game

Posted on: September 20th, 2013 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Written by Jeremy Feador, University Archivist, Ritter Library, Baldwin Wallace University

Outside League Park in Cleveland, between 1900-1910. Credit: Library of Congress
Outside League Park in Cleveland, c. 1900-1910.

Nestled on the corner of East 66th and Lexington Ave are the remnants of Cleveland’s League Park. To say that this plot of grass, remaining ticket house, and partial wall of the park are historic is an understatement.

In 1891, when a 24-year-old Cy Young stepped on the mound for the inaugural game at League Park, he ushered in a period of baseball history that can hardly be rivaled. That day he helped lead the Cleveland Spiders to victory over Cincinnati, 12-3.

Eight years later in 1899, the team set a mark that may never be equaled in baseball history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

The Devil's Advocate Guide to National Register Listing

Posted on: August 26th, 2013 by Guest Writer 4 Comments

 

by Aaron M. Dougherty, Will Interpret for Food

Historic Patten House (1898) in Palatine, Ill. Credit: chicagogeek, Flickr.
Historic Patten House (1898) in Palatine, Ill.

If you’re a preservation enthusiast, inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places comes with a lot of perks. (Read a quick primer here.) If you're not, you may think that George Washington’s inconsiderate decision to sleep in the 300-year-old farmhouse you just inherited is going to cause you a lot of headaches.

I’m not here to tell you about all the great things that will happen for you if you get registered. I’m here to play devil’s advocate: to tell you that if don’t want this kind of attention, the worst thing that could happen with federal registration is that you just ... keep on keeping on.

Why should your house be on the National Register? Well, why not?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

How We Came to Play: The History of Playgrounds

Posted on: August 15th, 2013 by Guest Writer 3 Comments

 

By Kaitlin O’Shea, Preservation in Pink

Giant Stride ca. 1910-1915 as would be seen on a Model Playground. Credit: Library of Congress.
Giant Stride ca. 1910-1915 as would be seen on a Model Playground.

On warm spring evenings, blustery fall afternoons, and sticky summer days, when nostalgia and memories brush past you, where does your mind go? Where did you spend many hours as a school-age child? For most of us it was a playground, whether climbing the playground equipment or running circles on the athletic field, letting our imaginations take us anywhere and everywhere.

Yet this was not always the case. Children of the 19th century didn’t have formal playgrounds. Originating as “sand gardens” in Germany in 1885, the beginnings of playgrounds appeared in the United States in Boston in 1886. And until the turn of the 20th century, playgrounds remained uncommon in public spaces.

But as industrialization and urbanization grew, so did the concern for public welfare. Humanitarians saw playgrounds as the solution to cramped quarters, poor air quality, and social isolation. This new concept could keep children off the dangerous streets and help them develop their physical health, good habits, socialization skills, and the pleasure of being a child.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.