Author Archive

 

Written by Mark Levitch, Art Historian and Founder, World War I Memorial Inventory Project

Rosedale, KS.  Rosedale World War I Memorial Arch. 1924. John LeRoy Marshall, architect. Credit: Mark Levitch
Architect John LeRoy Marshall designed the Rosedale World War I Memorial Arch (1924) in Rosedale, Kansas.

World War I, which started one hundred years ago this month, is generally considered one of America’s forgotten wars. But the war’s ubiquitous memorials -- perhaps more than for any other U.S. conflict -- beg to differ.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Estelle Axton: A Woman, A Place, and the Memphis Sound

Posted on: August 13th, 2014 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Siblings Jim Stewart and Estelle Axton defied cultural norms in the Jim Crow era to found Stax Records, one of the most influential soul and R&B labels of the 1960s and '70s. Credit: Stax Museum of American Soul Music
Siblings Jim Stewart and Estelle Axton defied cultural norms in the Jim Crow era to found Stax Records, one of the most influential soul and R&B labels of the 1960s and '70s.

There's no obvious reason why Estelle Axton and her brother Jim Stewart should have been the kind of people who would established Stax Records in the Jim Crow South.

One of the most prominent and influential soul and R&B labels of the 1960s, Stax artists included Otis Redding, Sam and Dave, Wilson Pickett, and Isaac Hayes, backed by the house band, Booker T. and the MGs. The studio was located in the blue-collar African-American neighborhood of South Memphis, was founded by a pair of white siblings, and was a tightknit family of black and white artists working together.

"Jim and Estelle were righteous people who were living during a time and in a place that suggested that they should be anything other than who they were," says Deanie Parker, who joined the Stax family as a teenager and went on to become director of publicity. Parker helped establish the Stax Museum of American Soul Music, which opened in 2003 on the site of the original studio.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Come High Water: Preservation and Resilience in Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Posted on: August 11th, 2014 by Guest Writer

 

Written by Daniel Ronan, Site Projects & Public Engagement Coordinator, National Public Housing Museum

Members of Save Cedar Rapids Heritage gather to protest the demolition of the Hach Building before the owner razed the building, considered a contributing structure in the New Bohemia Historic District. Credit: Cindy Hadish/Save CR Heritage
Members of Save CR Heritage gather to protest the demolition of the Hach Building before the owner razed the building, considered a contributing structure in the New Bohemia Historic District.

The saying “come Hell or high water” means “whatever it takes.” When the high waters really did come to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in 2008, the town discovered how to turn a disaster into an opportunity for preservation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Building the Brew: Historic Preservation & Breweries in Cincinnati

Posted on: June 25th, 2014 by Guest Writer

 

Written by Daniel Ronan, Site Projects & Public Engagement Coordinator, National Public Housing Museum

Credit: Jack Martin
The pump station in 1894 for the adjacent Eden Park Reservoir

When I visited Cincinnati for the first time in March, I was amazed by the Queen City’s fervor for historic preservation. In particular, efforts to revitalize neighborhoods such as the Over-the-Rhine (OTR) -- one of the largest historic districts in the United States -- and the enthusiasm for local preservation enthusiasm encouraged me to look deeper into Cincy’s burgeoning cultural renaissance.

And what says culture more than a pint of beer?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Millennials Take Cincy: Community Building Through Preservation

Posted on: April 28th, 2014 by Guest Writer

 

By Daniel Ronan, Program Coordinator, National Public Housing Museum

Credit: OTR A.D.O.P.T.
OTR A.D.O.P.T., Cincinnati Preservation Collective, and UC Preservation Action Network work together to clean out a building for affordable housing in the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood.

When I think of Cincinnati, I think about the Rust Belt. Growing up in the Northwest, I learned about the general decline of the Midwest as a center for American manufacturing, often a narrative of loss and economic devastation. When I visited Cincinnati in mid-March, however, I had the privilege of seeing an entirely different story.

It seems a little hackneyed at this point to say Cincinnati, or Cincy, is in the midst of a renaissance or renewal. But what is happening is a reflection of broader national trends. Millennials are flocking to places of community and history. As seen in places like Philadelphia, Buffalo, N.Y. , and Cleveland, one of the main ways millennials are getting involved in community building efforts is through historic preservation, which promotes economic stability and community identity.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.