Author Archive

 

By Sophia Dembling

150205_blog-photo_-JAWGC-with-brooms
When the Jessie Allen Wise Garden Club purchased the Excelsior Hotel in 1959, the ladies cleaned and furnished the neglected building themselves.

In the 1930s, a group of ladies started getting together to share recipes and gossip. They ended up saving a town.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

5 Unique Examples of Preserving Native American Historic Sites

Posted on: January 7th, 2015 by Guest Writer

 

By Kristi Eaton

150107_blog-photo_Native-American_michael-brown
Michael Brown, archaeologist for the Colorado Wickiup Project, records a wickiup in west central Colorado that dates to around A.D. 1795.

As the original inhabitants, Native Americans play a unique and significant part to the United States’ historic preservation efforts. In fact, Native American tribes have their own officers dedicated to preserving and restoring tribal history. (Learn more about tribal historic preservation officers, or THPOs, here.)

But for many of the more than 500 federally recognized tribes in the United States, that history is one of both pain and resiliency. Tribal members have said that some of the most painful experiences and memories include losing their land, being forced to relocate, and being forced to attend boarding schools. Restoring and preserving sites related to these periods can help educate today’s Native Americans as well as non-Native Americans about tribal history.

Below are some of the unique ways Native American communities are working in conjunction with state and federal agencies and private organizations to preserve tribal history and culture.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Sophia Dembling

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Left: A c. 1896 portrait of Emily Warren Roebling. Right: A sculpture at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge honors Emily, Washington, and John Roebling.

The first person ever to ride across the Brooklyn Bridge was the woman behind the man who built it: Emily Warren Roebling, wife of chief engineer Washington Roebling and a key figure in the great bridge's history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

By Kristi Eaton

The home as it currently looks as it nears completion of the restoration work
The Tulsa home as it currently looks as restoration work nears completion.

Mark Sanders had been driving by and looking at the McGregor House in Tulsa, Oklahoma, for more than 20 years. Something about the lines, he says, always appealed to him. He’d also heard rumblings that Bruce Goff -- known for being the mastermind behind some of Tulsa’s most noteworthy buildings, including the Boston Avenue Methodist Church -- may have designed the home, but nobody ever had solid confirmation. So Sanders continued to drive by admiring the home’s design.

But all that changed in 2013, when a For Sale By Owner sign was placed in the front yard of the home.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

[Interview] The American Legend Lives On at Lyndhurst Castle

Posted on: December 2nd, 2014 by Guest Writer

 

By Ashley & Brittany Hill

The 1838 Gothic Revival-style mansion Lyndhurst Castle in Tarrytown New York represents 175 years of influential American history.
The 1838 Gothic Revival-style mansion Lyndhurst Castle in Tarrytown, New York, represents over 175 years of influential American history.

Lyndhurst, a National Trust Historic Site, welcomed us to tour the property as part of our American Legend Tour, a nationwide commitment to raising historical awareness and educating America’s youth about the importance of the pursuit of the American Dream.

The American Dream permeates Lyndhurst’s history, as it was home to three influential families over the years: William Paulding; George Merritt, who doubled the size of the estate; and legendary railroad financier Jay Gould. Together, they represent about 175 years of history. Anna Gould, Duchess of Talleyrand and Princess de Sagan, donated the 67-acre estate in memory of her parents to the National Trust for Historic Preservation upon her death in 1961.

We spoke with Krystyn Hastings-Silver, associate director of Lyndhurst, about why she is passionate about preserving and portraying the memories of the Castle’s famous residents, what opportunities are available for the public to interact with the site, and how Lyndhurst is, in her words, “a time capsule.” [Interview is edited for length and clarity.]... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Tina Connor, Executive Vice President, Indiana Landmarks

A c. 1935 photo shows Wright’s influence in the design of Peters-Margedant House by William Wesley Peters.
A c. 1935 photo shows Wright’s influence in the design of Peters-Margedant House by William Wesley (Wes) Peters.

Most people know of Frank Lloyd Wright, the famous and influential American architect. Wes Peters (1912-1991), his right-hand man? Not so much.

Wright’s first Taliesin apprentice in 1932, Peters took a two-year break from the architect and returned to his hometown of Evansville, Indiana, from mid-1933 to 1935. Love caused the flight: Peters fell in love with Wright’s stepdaughter Svetlana, then a teenager, and her parents mightily disapproved.

Two years later, the Wrights relented. Peters and Svetlana married and returned to Taliesin, where Peters remained for the rest of his life, becoming chief architect after the master’s death in 1959 and retaining the title until his own death in 1991.

Though he would never claim credit as first, the humble apprentice designed the Usonian-style Peters-Margedant House in Evansville in 1935, two years before Frank Lloyd Wright’s first Usonian appeared in Madison, Wisconsin, in 1937. The Evansville house shows that Peters internalized Frank Lloyd Wright’s philosophy of organic architecture and his thoughts on creating affordable homes. Art historian Richard Guy Wilson believes the tiny house possesses national significance.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.