Author Archive

 

By William Tyre, Executive Director and Curator, Glessner House Museum


Glessner House Museum, restored 2011.

In 2013, Second Presbyterian Church of Chicago was designated a National Historic Landmark (NHL) -- the only individually listed church in the city to be so honored. On a personal level it represented something very special to me because it meant that I now lived, worked, and worshiped in National Historic Landmarks -- something I consider to be a rare and possibly unique privilege.
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Hinchliffe Stadium Reveals Baseball’s Hidden History

Posted on: April 15th, 2014 by Guest Writer 5 Comments

 

Written by Adrian Burgos, Jr., Professor, U.S. History, University of Illinois

Graffiti at Hinchliffe Stadium. Credit: DanielLugo, Flickr
Built in 1932, Hinchliffe Stadium is situated near Great Falls, a National Historic Landmark in Paterson, N.J.

Years before Jackie Robinson stepped across the white lines and onto Ebbets Field to make history as major league baseball's integration pioneer, decades before Roberto Clemente displayed his hitting prowess, graceful fielding, and powerful arm on North American baseball diamonds, and well before U.S. baseball fans became acquainted with the high-leg kick of Juan Marichal, the pitching gyrations of Luis Tiant, the prodigious home runs of Orlando Cepeda, other amazing performances of Big Papi David Ortiz, Pedro Martinez, and Manny Ramirez, black baseball fans congregated on Saturdays to watch the Negro League’s premier talent at Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J. -- a historic space where African-American and Latino fans watched some of their own perform during the era of segregated baseball.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

We're periodically featuring posts from our colleague Tom Mayes, deputy general counsel at the National Trust and a 2013 Rome Prize winner in Historic Preservation from the American Academy. (Follow Preservation Leadership Forum for Tom's periodic essays on "why old places matter.") Here on PreservationNation, he'll be sharing his reflections on preservation at home and abroad.

Patricia Cronin's "Ghosts" exhibit at Museo Centrale Montemartini, Rome, Italy. Credit: Thompson Mayes
Patricia Cronin's "Ghosts" exhibit at Museo Centrale Montemartini, Rome, Italy

“Context is everything,” says Patricia Cronin, talking about the placement of her art in old and historic places --  from the three-ton marble monument "Memorial to a Marriage" in historic Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, to her evanescent fabric Ghosts in Museo Centrale Montemartini, Rome.

“It’s not just ‘times three,’” she says. “It’s exponential.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

By Christine Madrid French, Project Director, Preservation Capen, Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

Project Director Christine Madrid French, with "Ginger" floating on the lake. Credit: Christine Madrid French
Project Director Christine Madrid French, with "Ginger" floating on the lake.

Veteran historic preservationists often grasp for creative opportunities to save an endangered building. In Winter Park, Florida, advocates for an 1885 house combined innovative nonprofit collaborations, engineering feats, and grassroots community outreach to mount an extraordinary preservation operation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

By Kathleen M. Yasas, President, Save The Sherburne Inn Restoration Project, Inc.

A bird's-eye-view of The Sherburne Inn today. Credit: Rick L. Crowell Photography
A bird's-eye-view of The Sherburne Inn today.

There was no Jimmy Stewart. No basket full of cash spilled onto a table to get George Bailey out of trouble. No little girl telling her daddy that every time a bell sounds an angel gets his wings. But there is no question that angels were close by on December 6, 2013, when The Sherburne Inn opened its doors for the first time in more than decade to welcome over a hundred people to gather and celebrate the rebirth of a century-old landmark.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.