Author Archive

 

Written by Sarah Fitts, Atlanta Movie Tours

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The Castleberry Hill neighborhood has been featured in films such as "Driving Miss Daisy," "Sweet Home Alabama," and "Ride Along."

Recently, Atlanta, Georgia, has become known as "The Hollywood of the South." Right now, over 35 television shows and movies are filming in and around the city. And although Atlanta’s movie business is just beginning to boom, there are several places in the city and in surrounding areas that have been saved from -- or face the threat of -- demolition.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

By Barbara Lau, Director of the Pauli Murray Project at Duke Human Rights Center

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Future home of the Pauli Murray Center for History and Social Justice, 2012.

Pauli Murray (1910-1985) was an accomplished human rights activist, historian, attorney, poet, and teacher who believed in justice, reconciliation, and freedom. “As an American,” she wrote in 1945, “I inherit the magnificent tradition of an endless march toward freedom and toward the dignity of all mankind.”

Mentor to luminaries such as Eleanor Holmes Norton, Marion Wright Edelman, and Ruth Bader Ginsberg, Pauli Murray referred to this march in a Ms. Magazine interview as a relay race. Today, the goal of the Pauli Murray Center for History and Social Justice is to nurture the next generation of Pauli Murrays -- and its new home will be none other than her childhood house.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

By Sophia Dembling

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Hetty Jane blasted the Great Pool out of granite as a swimming pool. It has several tiers of cascading water.

It all started with a little recreational trespassing.

"Everybody trespassed," says Jennifer Bigham. "Gazillions of people had done the same thing."

So she and her husband, just to satisfy their curiosity, climbed over a little fence to explore the ruins of Dunaway Gardens in Newnan, Georgia.

At first glance the property looked like little more than kudzu and swamp. But Bigham, who lives in nearby Peachtree City, saw magic.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Cinema History: Saved, Lost, and Threatened NYC Movie Locations

Posted on: February 16th, 2015 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Written by Georgette Blau, On Location Tours

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Now demolished, 5Pointz in New York City was featured in "Now You See Me" and "Rescue Me."

New York City is home to many famous historic landmarks, and it’s also the most filmed city in the world, with thousands of movies and TV shows being filmed here every year. The city is always changing, and some famous locations are threatened on a daily basis or have been demolished. But many more have been saved, preserving the entertainment and pop culture side of New York City, which is an important part of its history.

As the National Trust gears up for the Oscars on February 22, I've outlined some saved, demolished, and threatened sites well-known through movies and television. I'm very familiar with both movie locations and preservation, as I graduated from Skidmore College in 1996 with a degree in preservation, and in 1999 started On Location Tours to take tourists to these and other pop culture sites on a daily basis. Here are my highlights.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

By Sophia Dembling

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When the Jessie Allen Wise Garden Club purchased the Excelsior Hotel in 1959, the ladies cleaned and furnished the neglected building themselves.

In the 1930s, a group of ladies started getting together to share recipes and gossip. They ended up saving a town.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

5 Unique Examples of Preserving Native American Historic Sites

Posted on: January 7th, 2015 by Guest Writer

 

By Kristi Eaton

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Michael Brown, archaeologist for the Colorado Wickiup Project, records a wickiup in west central Colorado that dates to around A.D. 1795.

As the original inhabitants, Native Americans play a unique and significant part to the United States’ historic preservation efforts. In fact, Native American tribes have their own officers dedicated to preserving and restoring tribal history. (Learn more about tribal historic preservation officers, or THPOs, here.)

But for many of the more than 500 federally recognized tribes in the United States, that history is one of both pain and resiliency. Tribal members have said that some of the most painful experiences and memories include losing their land, being forced to relocate, and being forced to attend boarding schools. Restoring and preserving sites related to these periods can help educate today’s Native Americans as well as non-Native Americans about tribal history.

Below are some of the unique ways Native American communities are working in conjunction with state and federal agencies and private organizations to preserve tribal history and culture.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.