Author Archive

Cinema History: Saved, Lost, and Threatened NYC Movie Locations

Posted on: February 16th, 2015 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Written by Georgette Blau, On Location Tours

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Now demolished, 5Pointz in New York City was featured in "Now You See Me" and "Rescue Me."

New York City is home to many famous historic landmarks, and it’s also the most filmed city in the world, with thousands of movies and TV shows being filmed here every year. The city is always changing, and some famous locations are threatened on a daily basis or have been demolished. But many more have been saved, preserving the entertainment and pop culture side of New York City, which is an important part of its history.

As the National Trust gears up for the Oscars on February 22, I've outlined some saved, demolished, and threatened sites well-known through movies and television. I'm very familiar with both movie locations and preservation, as I graduated from Skidmore College in 1996 with a degree in preservation, and in 1999 started On Location Tours to take tourists to these and other pop culture sites on a daily basis. Here are my highlights.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

By Sophia Dembling

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When the Jessie Allen Wise Garden Club purchased the Excelsior Hotel in 1959, the ladies cleaned and furnished the neglected building themselves.

In the 1930s, a group of ladies started getting together to share recipes and gossip. They ended up saving a town.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

5 Unique Examples of Preserving Native American Historic Sites

Posted on: January 7th, 2015 by Guest Writer

 

By Kristi Eaton

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Michael Brown, archaeologist for the Colorado Wickiup Project, records a wickiup in west central Colorado that dates to around A.D. 1795.

As the original inhabitants, Native Americans play a unique and significant part to the United States’ historic preservation efforts. In fact, Native American tribes have their own officers dedicated to preserving and restoring tribal history. (Learn more about tribal historic preservation officers, or THPOs, here.)

But for many of the more than 500 federally recognized tribes in the United States, that history is one of both pain and resiliency. Tribal members have said that some of the most painful experiences and memories include losing their land, being forced to relocate, and being forced to attend boarding schools. Restoring and preserving sites related to these periods can help educate today’s Native Americans as well as non-Native Americans about tribal history.

Below are some of the unique ways Native American communities are working in conjunction with state and federal agencies and private organizations to preserve tribal history and culture.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Sophia Dembling

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Left: A c. 1896 portrait of Emily Warren Roebling. Right: A sculpture at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge honors Emily, Washington, and John Roebling.

The first person ever to ride across the Brooklyn Bridge was the woman behind the man who built it: Emily Warren Roebling, wife of chief engineer Washington Roebling and a key figure in the great bridge's history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

By Kristi Eaton

The home as it currently looks as it nears completion of the restoration work
The Tulsa home as it currently looks as restoration work nears completion.

Mark Sanders had been driving by and looking at the McGregor House in Tulsa, Oklahoma, for more than 20 years. Something about the lines, he says, always appealed to him. He’d also heard rumblings that Bruce Goff -- known for being the mastermind behind some of Tulsa’s most noteworthy buildings, including the Boston Avenue Methodist Church -- may have designed the home, but nobody ever had solid confirmation. So Sanders continued to drive by admiring the home’s design.

But all that changed in 2013, when a For Sale By Owner sign was placed in the front yard of the home.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.