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In the preservation world, the term “recent past” most commonly refers to historic places younger than 50 years old. Modernism, which is another term often associated with the recent past, is generally defined as a style that began to flourish in the United States in the 1930s. Both describe places and cultural resources that are among the most under-appreciated and vulnerable aspects of our nation’s heritage.

You may already know about our country’s recent past story through architectural icons like the Farnsworth House or Glass House (both sites of the National Trust for Historic Preservation), designed landscapes like Lawrence Halprin’s Freeway Park, and nationally significant historic sites like Lorraine Motel, associated with the Civil Rights Movement.

But this story is also told in less prominent places that are equally important to local communities and reveal much about who we are and where we've come from -- early fast-food restaurants, drive-through branch banks, post-war housing projects, and suburban developments. And, often, these lesser-known places are the ones at risk, perceived as expendable, unattractive, or unworthy of preservation.

Here are 10 things you can do to help save a place from the recent past in your community:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

Historic Real Estate: The Lighthouse Edition

Posted on: July 12th, 2013 by Emily Potter 6 Comments

 

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North Pierhead Lighthouse, off the coast of Lake Michigan

Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal North Pierhead Lighthouse -- Sturgeon Bay, WI

There are several lights along the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, but the North Pierhead Lighthouse was the first. Situated just off the coastline of Lake Michigan, the original lighthouse was constructed in 1881, but when the light and fog signal needed major repairs, a new tower was built in 1903 at the outermost point of the pier. Price tag: Contact agent for price... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

[10 on Tuesday] How to Save Your Historic Neighborhood School

Posted on: June 25th, 2013 by Emily Potter

 

Historic neighborhood schools are anchors within our communities. They offer students distinctive and unique places to learn. They provide constant and subtle lessons about the history of their town and respect for the past. And, as they are often within walking distance, local schools encourage students to walk or bike, promoting healthy activity and a chance to experience and engage with their surroundings.

Yet, in recent years, America’s older and historic neighborhood schools are being increasingly demolished or deserted in favor of newer and bigger buildings located farther away.

The National Trust first brought national attention to this issue in 2000, when we named Historic Neighborhood Schools to the America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list. We continue to advocate for these special places through our National Treasures work preserving Rosenwald Schools.

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Musselshell School in Musselshell County, Montana. Historic Rural Schoolhouses of Montana were named to the 2013 America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list

As preservationists, we know there is a better solution for our local historic schools. It’s up to us to take a stand when one of these community landmarks is at risk. Here are 10 steps you can take to help save a threatened historic school in your neighborhood:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

Historic Real Estate: The Stone Home Edition

Posted on: June 14th, 2013 by Emily Potter 3 Comments

 

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Hendrick Kip House -- Fishkill, New York

Built in 1753, the Hendrick Kip House is one of the oldest pre-revolutionary homesteads in Duchess County, New York. It once served as the headquarters for Baron von Steuben, a Major General during the Revolutionary War. Today the stone country estate sits fully restored on 50 acres. Price tag: $779,000

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Historic 1750 Stone House -- Saugerties, New York

Carefully restored features such as exposed beams, wide Kingsboard floors, a nine-foot hearth, and hand-forged hardware make this home elegant and unique. Breathtaking mountain views surround the home and its three-car garage, horse barn, and outdoor heated pool. It is currently a vacation rental. Price tag: $995,000

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French Country Stone Cottage -- Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania

Reminiscent of a French country chateau, this oval stone cottage overlooks the beautiful Lackawaxen River, made famous by author Zane Grey, known for his adventure novels about the American frontier, such as Riders of the Purple Sage. Private beach frontage and a screened-in gazebo offer easy access to idyllic views. Price tag: $549,000

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

Historic Real Estate: The Doctor’s House Edition

Posted on: May 31st, 2013 by Emily Potter 1 Comment

 

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Rear view of Grandview Estate in Nashville, Ill.

Grandview Estate -- Nashville, Illinois

This beautiful Italianate home in the quaint town of Nashville, Illinois was carefully and lovingly restored by previous owners Dr. and Mrs. Robert L. Stevenson. The house’s 4,000 square feet include five bedrooms and three bathrooms, a breakfast nook, and two parlors. Price tag: $450,000... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.