Author Archive

 

blog_photo_Anne and Aaron at La Salle
Anne and Aaron at the re-dedication of the La Salle County Courthouse.

We all feel some kind of love for a certain place (or places). That’s why we’re preservationists. So what happens when two preservationists fall in love? In the case of one Texas couple, meeting each other launched a commitment to celebrating the places they love together -- by visiting all the historic courthouses across the Lone Star State.

I talked with Anne Cornell shortly after she and her fiancé, Aaron Mason, attended the Comal County Courthouse celebration, which was one of the first events in our “I Love Texas Courthouses” campaign. Having just completed their courthouse journey on December 1, 2012, their tale of Texas love is inspiring in more ways than one.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

Historic Real Estate: The Fixer-Upper Edition

Posted on: February 8th, 2013 by Emily Potter 1 Comment

 

blog_photo_Old Home Bank
Old Home Bank at the corner of N. 3rd Street and W Main Street in Newark, Ohio.

Historic Louis Sullivan Bank Building -- Newark, Ohio

The Old Home Bank is an extraordinary space to rent or own. The building was designed by architect Louis Sullivan, mentor to Frank Lloyd Wright, and first opened in 1915. Located in historic downtown Newark square, the bank building is ready to be restored and re-opened. Price tag: $750,000... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

[10 on Tuesday] 10 Basic Elements of a Preservation Ordinance

Posted on: February 5th, 2013 by Emily Potter 1 Comment

 

If you’ve been following along through our toolkit series on establishing a local historic district, you know that your community should develop a task force; understand and communicate the benefits of historic district designation; and decide on where the boundary lines should be set to ensure you keep the “local” in your local historic district.

Next, you’ll need to develop the legislation -- a preservation ordinance -- to protect the historic resources in your community.

A preservation ordinance is a local statute enacted to protect buildings and neighborhoods from destruction or insensitive rehabilitation. It also establishes a design review board (known as the preservation commission) and process, which are critical for securing historic district designation.

Developing a preservation ordinance demonstrates the willingness of a community to recognize, invest in, and protect its historic character. And while every community’s ordinance should be written to meet the specific needs of the area, each should have these 10 basic components:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

Historic Real Estate: The Farming Edition

Posted on: January 25th, 2013 by Emily Potter 1 Comment

 

blog_photo_North Carolina Farm House
The historic farm house in Star, NC.

Spacious Rambling Farm House -- Star, North Carolina

Classic country living, this rambling farm house sits on just over 1.8 acres. Built in 1900, you get all the original features, like 9-foot ceilings, a rock fireplace, and wrap-around front porch, but also more modern amenities, including an eat-at bar in the kitchen and updated wiring and plumbing (thank goodness!). Price tag: $120,000

blog_photo_Michael Rugh Farm House
The original stone farm house of Michael Rugh (left) and an addition (right).

Historic Farm House of Michael Rugh -- Murrysville, Pennsylvania

Michael Rugh, an early resident in this area of Pennsylvania and a prominent attorney, built the house around 1790. Relax in the family room and look out over three acres of land through floor to ceiling windows, or enjoy the fully loaded master bedroom suite, complete with a private dressing area and spa bath. Price tag: $849,000

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A section of the Bluegrass Farm.

Bluegrass Farm -- Scott County, Kentucky

Bluegrass Farm is a beautiful 118 acres that runs along scenic Route 460 between Paris and Georgetown in Kentucky. It comes with a 16-stall horse barn and Morton building for farm equipment. In true preservation form, the land is restricted from development except for two residences, barns, and any buildings necessary to run the farm. Price tag: $1,770,000

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

Preservation Round-Up: The Oldest Distillery in the U.S. Edition

Posted on: January 11th, 2013 by Emily Potter

 

blog_photo_Preservation Round Up_Distillery
The oldest distillery in the U.S., Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort, Kentucky.

Did You Know? -- Bricks + Mortar

“Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort, Kentucky is the oldest continually operation distillery in the US?* Its 130-acre facility includes 4 centuries of architecture that is well-maintained and fully operational!”

The Sweet Sound of Renovation: A Concert Hall Loft -- Apartment Therapy

“Adaptive reuse is one of the best forms of creative and eco-friendly construction. Whether it's a former school house or church, buildings with a past life often make for some of the most interesting homes and interiors. This social hall in New York City is no exception -- the 32-foot barrel arched ceilings, porthole windows, stage lighting and old wood floors make a for a one-of-a-kind residence.”

Cyclorama Building at Gettysburg Will Be Demolished -- Philly.com

“A 14-year battle over the fate of a modern structure at the heart of Gettysburg National Military Park is over. The National Park Service said Thursday that it would begin demolishing the Cyclorama building as soon as February, clearing the site ahead of the 150th anniversary commemoration of the battle.”

Overdue Convenience of the Day: City Hall as Food Truck -- Atlantic Cities

“How did it take so long for this to happen? Boston's Brutalist City Hall building, designed by Paul Rudolph, may be the least popular City Hall in the country. It has only two stars on Yelp. And, like all government buildings, it is the site of bleak bureaucratic pilgrimages in search of forms and documents.”

A History of Home -- Sustainable Cities Collective

“We are often entrapped in the world of the now. We hardly ever look back, but it is surprising to find that once we do, we find the past is still lingers in every object around us. After having read Lucy Worsley's "If Walls Could Talk: An intimate history of the home," I look at my current spartan surroundings with a new appreciation.”

The Genius of Traditional Buildings -- Urban Indy

“Have you ever been to an old downtown and marveled at the historic buildings? Have you ever wondered how they could create such beautiful buildings on such small budgets, compared to the placeless architecture we are told is barely affordable today?”

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.