Author Archive

[Historic Bars] McGreevey’s 3rd Base Saloon in Boston

Posted on: September 4th, 2014 by David Weible

 

Preservation Nation continues its tour of historic bars as we slide (or stumble) our way into the musty dugouts that have served as the home bases for sports fans across the nation as they ride the bench and cheer their favorite teams. First up for America’s historic sports bars: McGreevey’s 3rd Base Saloon in Boston.

McGreevey’s not only claims to be America’s first sports bar, it’s also the birthplace of the Red Sox Royal Rooters club, and the home of Boston’s famous Celtic punk-rock band, the Dropkick Murphys. Credit Flickr user Echo9er
McGreevey’s not only claims to be America’s first sports bar, it’s also the birthplace of the Red Sox Royal Rooters club, and the home of Boston’s famous Celtic punk-rock band, the Dropkick Murphys.

With 7 major sports championships since 2004, and something of a reputation for drinking, Boston is the perfect place to start our tour of historic sports bars (as much as this Cleveland fan hates to admit it). And when you think historic sports bars in Boston, you think one place: McGreevey’s.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Military Veterans Tackle HOPE Crew Project at Custer National Cemetery

Posted on: August 25th, 2014 by David Weible

 

The HOPE Crew’s Custer National Cemetery project was the first to incorporate an all-veteran hitch. Participants represented every branch of the military. Credit: Audrey Hall
The HOPE Crew’s Custer National Cemetery project was the first to incorporate an all-veteran hitch. Participants represented every branch of the military.

It’s one of the most famous battles in American history. In May, 1876, Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer and his 7th Cavalry tracked down roughly 8,000 Cheyenne and Sioux Indians in southeastern Montana and stepped into battle with about 1,800 of them. The rest, as they say, is history.

Now a small piece of that history is being restored, with help from the National Trust, The Corps Network, The Montana Conservation Corps, and the National Park Service’s Historic Preservation Training Center.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Historic Bars] Carousel Bar & Lounge in New Orleans

Posted on: August 7th, 2014 by David Weible 3 Comments

 

Preservation Nation continues its tour of historic bars as we sashay our way into America’s historic cocktail lounges, the upscale gin joints where high society has sipped sophistication for decades. First round (literally): The Carousel Bar & Lounge in New Orleans, Louisiana.

The Carousel Bar in all its glory. Credit: Dan Silvers, Flickr
The Carousel Bar in all its glory

The history of the Carousel is inextricably linked to the hotel in which it sits: the Hotel Monteleone, a Historic Hotels of America member in New Orleans’ French Quarter.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

St. Louis’ contributions to American music reveal a legacy greater and more significant than previously understood, and the Palladium is a central part of this story. Credit: Paul Sableman
St. Louis’ contributions to American music reveal a legacy greater and more significant than previously understood, and the Palladium is a central part of this story.

"There are only three things America will be remembered for 2,000 years from now -- the Constitution, jazz music, and baseball," said renowned essayist and American culture critic Gerald Early in the 1994 Ken Burns documentary Baseball. "Those are the three most beautiful things this culture’s ever created."

If his belief proves true, it’ll be an excellent legacy. And if we take the Washington University in St. Louis faculty member’s adopted hometown as an example -- with the Constitution in relative safety and the hometown Cardinals a perennial World Series contender -- it seems we’d do well by our stars to focus on jazz a little bit.

Enter the St. Louis Palladium Building.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Historic Bars] Scholz Garten in Austin, Texas

Posted on: July 9th, 2014 by David Weible

 

Over the next few weeks, PreservationNation will continue its historic bars series with America’s takes on the shady, beer-brewing bodegas that originally sprouted in the Fatherland. Our first spot is not only one of the country’s oldest beer gardens, it’s also the longest continuously operating business in its hometown. Below is a rundown of the Scholz Garten.

Credit: Carlos Lowry, Flickr
The Scholz Garten has been an Austin institution since the day the original bar opened its doors in 1866.

Pop quiz: What do all of the following things have in common?

Bunsen burners, crop rotation, kindergarten, tubas, sausage, Christmas trees, the Easter Bunny, Levi’s (and blue jeans in general), and beer gardens (or biergartens).... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.