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Credit: Elizabeth Gill Lui
What is now the Tangier American Legation in Morocco played a key role in the Allied invasion of North Africa during World War II.

If you had to guess, you’d probably think the first American-owned government property outside of our borders was in France, or Canada, or maybe even Japan. But you’d be way off. In fact, you wouldn’t even be on the right continent.

The longest tenured American-owned property on foreign soil is in Africa -- Tangier, Morocco, to be exact. It’s the only National Historic Landmark on foreign soil and has served as a symbol of American engagement with the Islamic world and North Africa since the early days of the republic.

Morocco was the first country to recognize American statehood (in June of 1786). What is now known as the Tangier American Legation in Morocco (TALIM) was gifted to the American government by Sultan Moulay Suleiman in 1821. Since then, it’s acquired quite a bit of history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Tampa’s Jackson Rooming House: Music to a Preservationist’s Ears

Posted on: May 19th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

Jackson Rooming House, exterior. Credit: Bracken Engineering
Outside the Jackson Rooming House

Though there’s no clear record for when exactly it was built, Tampa’s Jackson Rooming House started off as a typical single-family home in the 1890s. It wasn’t until between 1901 and 1905 that it received its addition and became the one of the city’s few rooming houses that catered to African-Americans during the era of segregation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Atlanta’s Swan House: From Historic Home to “Hunger Games” Set

Posted on: May 2nd, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

Crews also setup scenes in the front yard of Sawn House, which was used as the set for President Snow’s version of the White House. Credit: Atlanta History Center
Crews set up scenes in the front yard of Swan House, which was used as the set for President Snow’s version of the White House.

The Swan House in Atlanta’s Buckhead neighborhood is a 1928 Classical mansion and onetime home to the Inman family, whose wealth helped to rebuild the city after its destruction during the Civil War. More recently, the house, designed by Phillip Trammell Shutze, has become the home of the Atlanta Historical Society, and even one of the sets for the 2013 film "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire."

I sat down with the Swan House’s Brandi Wigley and Jessica Rast to get the scoop on the house’s history and its role in the blockbuster film.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 


Hinchliffe Stadium’s Art Deco cast concrete construction has long suffered from neglect.

The 1933 Art Deco Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J., is one of the few remaining stadiums in the country associated with Negro League Baseball, and the former home to some of the league’s greatest players and teams.

In connection with today’s community cleanup of Hinchliffe, coordinated by the National Trust, the city of Paterson, and the Hinchliffe Steering Committee, PreservationNation spoke with famed Negro League historian Dr. Larry Hogan about the significance of Hinchliffe Stadium and the legacy of Negro League Baseball.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Citizens Fight for the Northfield Post Office in Minnesota

Posted on: April 3rd, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 


Set just off of Bridge Square, the 1936 post office overlooks the Cannon River.

Whether it’s their historic downtown (listed on the National Register since 1983), the original Malt-O-Meal mill, which still produces the classic hot breakfast cereal, or the annual celebration of the town’s 1876 defeat of Jesse James and his gang during an attempted bank robbery, the city of Northfield, Minn., has always valued its history. Now, the town of roughly 20,000 residents, 40 miles south of Minneapolis, is fighting to save another prized possession: its 1936 post office.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.