Author Archive

 

Welcome back, Historic Bars series! Let's start it off right with a trip to Milwaukee.

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The Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery is now a tavern, event center, and gift shop.

Before it was in the hand of every horn-rimmed, flannel-clad, suspender-wearing urban farmer (read: “hipster”), Pabst Blue Ribbon was a classic, blue-collar American beer down on its luck.

The same could be said for the actual Pabst Brewery, though its hero was a genuine, good-natured guy by the name of Jim Haertel, now the owner of Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[PHOTOS] Harewood: A Tour of Samuel Washington’s Home

Posted on: June 2nd, 2015 by David Weible 1 Comment

 

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Sure, you learned about George Washington in grade school, but how much do you really know the Washington family?

The PreservationNation blog was lucky enough to score a tour of the West Virginia home of Samuel Washington, younger brother of George. Read on for exclusive photos and a glimpse into the history of one of America's most famous families.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

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There are alternatives to Dominion's current plan to construct high-voltage transmission lines across the James River.

Despite the fact that it would destroy the public’s enjoyment of a beautiful stretch of river, ruin the historic context of irreplaceable historic assets like Jamestown and Colonial Parkway, and mar a landscape that’s been largely unchanged for thousands of years, Dominion Virginia Power still wants to construct high-voltage transmission lines across the James River.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. There are alternatives.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

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Colonial Parkway offers a variety of stunning vistas of the James, from marshy inland waterways to vast expanses of open river.

For local residents and international visitors alike, the Colonial Parkway is an important part of experiencing the beauty and the history of the James River.

The 23-mile scenic roadway, administered by the National Park Service, connects Yorktown, Williamsburg, and Jamestown, three of Virginia’s most important historic sites. The roadway was designed to fit into the landscape, unobtrusively snaking its way from site to site through forest, marshland, and along the scenic James River.

But of all the historic and cultural sites along the river, Colonial Parkway may be affected the most by Dominion’s plan to construct high-voltage transmission lines. Its grandest view of the river -- one that has gone largely unchanged since even before Captain John Smith first sailed its waters in 1607 -- would be ruined by the construction of Dominion’s transmission lines, effectively destroying the cultural heritage that generations have fought to create and protect.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

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Since the rediscovery of Jamestown 21 years ago, archeologist have found 2 million artifacts from excavation sites.

Of all the historic and environmentally significant sites along the James River, Jamestown is the true centerpiece.

It’s where Captain John Smith and his crew of roughly 100 men and boys landed in 1607 and established the first permanent English colony on American soil. It’s also where the first democratic form of government in the Americas was founded, and where Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans first interacted with one another for an extended period.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

If you’ve been following along with our How to Save a Place toolkit series, your plan to save the historic place that matters to you is likely beginning to take shape. But there’s still one significant element that you probably need more guidance on: fundraising.

It takes money to make things happen. Money enables you to hire craftsmen, build advocacy campaigns, purchase materials and equipment, and much more. Asking for funding doesn’t have to be a daunting challenge, though. No matter your approach, there is one universal truth about fundraising: People give because someone asked them.

This toolkit provides you with some fundamental steps for fundraising. If you can put these basics into practice, then you will increase your chances of turning an ask into financial support for your great preservation work.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.