Author Archive

 


Hinchliffe Stadium’s Art Deco cast concrete construction has long suffered from neglect.

The 1933 Art Deco Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J., is one of the few remaining stadiums in the country associated with Negro League Baseball, and the former home to some of the league’s greatest players and teams.

In connection with today’s community cleanup of Hinchliffe, coordinated by the National Trust, the city of Paterson, and the Hinchliffe Steering Committee, PreservationNation spoke with famed Negro League historian Dr. Larry Hogan about the significance of Hinchliffe Stadium and the legacy of Negro League Baseball.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Citizens Fight for the Northfield Post Office in Minnesota

Posted on: April 3rd, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 


Set just off of Bridge Square, the 1936 post office overlooks the Cannon River.

Whether it’s their historic downtown (listed on the National Register since 1983), the original Malt-O-Meal mill, which still produces the classic hot breakfast cereal, or the annual celebration of the town’s 1876 defeat of Jesse James and his gang during an attempted bank robbery, the city of Northfield, Minn., has always valued its history. Now, the town of roughly 20,000 residents, 40 miles south of Minneapolis, is fighting to save another prized possession: its 1936 post office.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

The Palestra: College Hoops’ Most Storied Arena

Posted on: March 18th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

Credit: Ed B, Flickr
The Palestra is famous its raucous atmosphere and for its seating that reaches right to the floor.

There’s a reason why they refer to the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament as March Madness: On top of the fact that the games themselves are crazy, basically the whole country goes wild over it. (When else do you see grown men and women biting their nails and sweating in their offices cubicles over whether to scribble “Dayton” or “Ohio State” on a piece of paper?)

But even with the onset of live-streaming five-game simulcasts and billion-dollar bracket giveaways, the game still has plenty of history to celebrate. Case in point: Philadelphia’s 1927 hoops arena known as the Palestra.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Desegregation Landmark in New Orleans Again Offers Education — and Healing

Posted on: March 7th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

The William Frantz Elementary, now Akili Academy, in New Orleans' upper 9th Ward after restoration.
The William Frantz Elementary, now Akili Academy, in New Orleans' upper 9th Ward after restoration

On November 14, 1960, 6-year-old Ruby Bridges started her first day at the William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans’ Upper 9th Ward. As one of the first children to integrate public schools in the city, she was escorted to the building by federal marshals through throngs of hostile protestors.

“I remember turning onto the street. I saw barricades, and police officers, and just people everywhere,” Bridges recalled in a PBS documentary that aired in November. “When I saw all of that, I immediately thought that it was Mardi Gras. I had no idea that they were here to keep me out of the school."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Woodrow Wilson's Boyhood Home Receives a Reconstruction All Its Own

Posted on: February 17th, 2014 by David Robert Weible 2 Comments

 

The project restored the original paint scheme to the Woodrow Wilson Boyhood Home. Credit: Historic Columbia
The project restored the original paint scheme to the Woodrow Wilson Boyhood Home.

Long before Woodrow Wilson entered the presidency in 1913, he was a normal teenage kid who liked baseball and watching trains. In 1871, just before his 14th birthday, his father moved the family from Augusta, Ga., to Columbia, S.C., and though they would spend only two-and-a-half years there, the place would have a strong impact on shaping the nation’s 28th president.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.