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Historic Properties for Sale: Hello Ohio Edition

Posted on: September 16th, 2011 by David Garber 2 Comments

 

As a one-time Ohio resident (go Miami Redhawks!) I can say with confidence that it's a state with a heckuva lot going for it. Cities like Cincinnati and Cleveland are on the rise, there's a hometown localism that's hard to ignore, and it has that American-flags-painted-on-barns-in-the-middle-of-giant-fields spirit infused throughout.

This week's Historic Properties for Sale post features three oh-so buyable places in Ohio, only one of which is actually a house.

Weiant-Wehrle House - Newark, Ohio

Nestled in a close, social neighborhood, which hosts the active Historic Hudson Community Association, this 4,000 square foot, 6-bedroom home is a preservationist dream.Built in 1890 out of brick and stone, the home features a wraparound porch is on a double city lot with a detached carriage house.

Libbey High School - Toledo, Ohio

Okay, so technically this went up for auction in August, but it's still a neat property to gawk over, so I'm including here with no hesitancy. If I didn't know otherwise, I might say it was the school from Sabrina the Teenage Witch - it's Just. That. Classic. (But why do school systems always drop the ceilings and reduce window height??)

Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church - Cincinnati, Ohio

Vacant since 1989, this church is the primary landmark of Sedamsville, a Near West Side community two miles from downtown. It is beautifully sited on a hilltop overlooking the Ohio River andKentucky hills. Our Lady of Perpetual Help is an ornate Gothic Revival brick church designed by German-American architect Adolph Druiding. It features ornamental brickwork, a rose window, an interior balcony and a 170’ spire.

David Garber is a member of the Digital and New Media team at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Preservation Round-Up: Color Pop Edition

Posted on: September 12th, 2011 by David Garber

 


Local business adds color to New Orleans' Uptown section. (Photo: Flickr user Infrogmation)

This week in Nola.com's awesome StreetWalker series is a feature on Uptown New Orleans' colorful West Bouligny neighborhood. Read all about it and see the great photos of New Orleans detailing, then click through to past neighborhood profiles.

I'm harboring a little bit of job envy over this. The Seattle Times' article "The art of living well, almost anywhere" profiles the almost-nomadic lifestyle of Sheila and Peter Potter who "move into empty properties with their antique furniture and art, creating a timeworn look in a matter of weeks."

"Those buildings in the middle of your cities are worth keeping around. Worth investing in. They’re your history. They don’t make ‘em like that anymore and it’s not going to be cheap to fix them. But it’s worth it." Umm, yes. Agree. Citiography lays out the reasons to keep Historic Preservation Tax Credits around even during tough economic times.

Old House Web has a great primer on financing restorations of old and historic homes. "When it comes to historic properties, often the purchase is relatively cheap. That’s because so many historic homes need a great deal of work in order to return to their former glory, and not many homeowners want to take on the task. However, once the purchase is done, the serious financing starts."

If you aren't a regular reader of Kaid Benfield's blog, it's time for a new bookmark. He consistently gets it right with posts on community and the way we build. His latest, "The legacy of 9/11 for community and the built environment" talk about the effect security measure have had on our experience of America's important places.

And lastly, here are two great stories about Founding Father-related homes in New York. The first, Alexander Hamilton's "Hamilton Grange" was recently moved to Harlem's St. Nicholas Park. The second, a gorgeously-renovated home now for sale in Scarsdale, once hosted George Washington for lunch.

David Garber is a member of the Digital and New Media team at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He now wants to go to New Orleans, be a live-in home stager, and own an 18th century home.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Historic Properties for Sale: You've Got a Friend in… Edition

Posted on: September 9th, 2011 by David Garber

 

You've got a friend in Pennsylvania! And a house, too, if you so choose. (And a "Save Wild Animals" license plate with a photo of a tiger on it... who knew they were native to the Keystone State??) Anyhoo, check out these lovely old Pennsylvania homes from our Historic Properties for Sale page.

Farm House - Chambersburg, Pennsylvania

Built in 1800, this stone and log home sits on 10 magnificently-landscaped acres. The property includes a renovated barn/guest house, a caretakers home, and gardens featuring a fruit-bearing orchard, berries, asparagus beds, a "private rose garden" with lily pond, and an in-ground pool. (Tell me where to sign!)

Castle Finn Mansion - Delta, Pennsylvania

Built in 1819, by Joseph Webb on the site of his iron forge, Castle Finn is one of the original Pennsylvania Mansions. Located on a hill overlooking Muddy Creek and the site of what was once the Palmyra Forge, this wealthy "ironmaster's" home was the bustling hub of the forge community. With spacious rooms and 11 foot ceilings, this Federal style manor home was built by master craftsmen and retains much of its original and unique architectural detailing.

Fairbrook Manor - Pennsylvania Furnace, Pennsylvania

Fairbrook Manor was built in 1834 and sits on 40 acres less than 20 minutes from State College and Penn State University. It is considered the largest and best preserved of the Central Pennsylvania manor houses, and includes nearly one mile of the famed Spruce Creek fishery.

David Garber is a member of the Digital and New Media team at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. With each new state he write about, he wants to go there. Right now.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Preservation Round-Up: "A" Marks the Spot Edition

Posted on: September 8th, 2011 by David Garber

 


'Map' by Aram Bartholl 2006-2011. (Photo: Anne Foures)

Here at the InterNational Trust for Historic Preservation, we appreciate a good place-based story, even if it does bounce our typical boundaries a bit. (Don't worry, most of today's stories are from the USofA.)

I'll get the international one out of the way first: German artist Aram Bartholl has created a play on the Google Maps markers (see above photo) used to identify the center of towns and cities. "By blowing Google’s red markers up to “life-size” and physically planting them in actual places, Bartholl brings attention to the blurring between real and virtual space. His cheeky sculptures ask the question: where is the center of a city?" (Architizer)

How cool is this? The Metropolitan Transit Authority in New York is running prohibition-era subway trains again. According to The Wall Street Journal, "HBO is paying the agency more than $150,000, according to an MTA spokesman, to run a Prohibition-era train along the 2/3 line in Manhattan during four September weekends. It’s a promotion for the second season of “Boardwalk Empire", a drama set in 1920s Atlantic City."

The world-famous art deco Waldorf-Astoria hotel is seeking to make changes to its entrance canopy. According to interviews by DNAinfo.com, "The new design ... is intended to focus attention on the landmarked building’s Indiana Limestone façade instead of the canopy."

And for our last New York story... The Municipal Art Society of New York and the Landmarks Preservation Commission are producing a manual for increasing the efficiency and sustainability of old buildings. "Roughly 55 percent of New York’s building stock is more than 70 years old, and any serious efforts to build a more sustainable city must include solutions for making these older buildings more efficient."

Southern Maryland's Sutterly Plantation (c. 1703) was damaged during last week's hurricane. Despite the chaotic current state of affairs, the historic site's blog was still upbeat. "Although this is devastating, we were so incredibly fortunate,” stated Nancy Easterling, Executive Director. “The 1703 Plantation House is in good shape, despite near misses by several enormous trees. Our newly restored Slave Cabin, while affected, is still intact. Our magnificent gardens are still glorious."

In Durham, North Carolina, the Durham School of the Arts’ Carr Building was completely renovated. The project finished on time and parts of the renovation specifically highlight the contrast of old and new - like retaining portions of old plaster on an exposed brick wall. (The Herald-Sun)

A Revolutionary War-era canon was pulled from the depths of the Detroit River yesterday. In the last three decades, four other canons have been found in the same river. "One theory is that the British were moving some of the cannons down the Detroit River to Ft. Malden in Amherstburg, Ontario, and they went overboard or the boat sunk in 1796, Stone said. They appear to have been made before 1760, but could have gone down anytime up to the War of 1812." (Detroit Free Press)

The Historic Preservation League of Oregon is seeking to create guidelines for new architecture in historic districts. "Peggy Moretti, director of the state-wide preservation advocacy group, said goal of the year-long project is to provide inspiration and guidance for new projects in historic districts. Too often, she said, preservationists are perceived “as purveyors of 'no.'"" (Portland Architecture)

David Garber is a member of the Digital and New Media team at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He can also be found on twitter at @GarberDC.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Historic Properties for Sale: Under $200K Edition

Posted on: September 2nd, 2011 by David Garber 1 Comment

 

As much as I love profiling grandiose homes with foyers the size of my entire apartment, backyard pools overlooking rolling countryside, and platinum chandeliers dripping with crystal, I figured it was time to swoop down from dream-land this week and rest my feet on the cold yet comforting solid ground of reality. Fact of the matter is, not everyone has 11 million to spend on a house they found reading blogs on a Friday afternoon.

Oliver House - Milton, North Carolina

Built around 1845, the historic Oliver House was renovated according to Department of Interior and historic restoration guidelines. The home boasts three fireplaces, original mantels and moldings, as well as a second-floor screen porch. Pricetag: $125,000

Picturesque Italianate - Independence, Missouri

This 2,146 square foot house is move-in ready but awaiting your personal style and touch. Built in 1886 and located one block east of the Vaile Mansion - which is considered to be one of the best examples of Second Empire Victorian architecture - this home also features a one-bedroom backyard guest house. Pricetag: $99,900

Hudson Valley Hamlet Home - Claverack, New York

Located on one acre of land and within walking distance to the local library and grocery store, this center-staircase 1820 home still has much of its original interiors and hardware, a two-car garage, and new standing-seam metal roofs. Pricetage: $189,900

David Garber is a member of the Digital and New Media team at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He enjoys tangy frozen yogurt, good music, and long walks on the beach.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.