Conferences

Take Advantage of Free Virtual Programming at PastForward 2014

Posted on: October 17th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

Written by Colleen Danz, Manager, Forum Marketing

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For more than 40 years, preservationists have been meeting in cities across the country to discuss the pressing issues of the day, explore preservation in action, and reconnect with their peers. The National Preservation Conference has always been the place to put a national spotlight on historic preservation.

The tradition will continue this year when more than 2,000 preservationists descend on Savannah, Nov. 11-14, for this year’s National Preservation Conference, PastForward. And who wouldn’t want to make a trip to such a delightful city?  But time and schedules don’t always permit everyone passionate for historic preservation (professionals, hobbyists, and otherwise) to attend. So for those of you who can’t be there in person, we invite you to be our virtual attendees.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

Scenes from the 2012 National Preservation Conference in Spokane.

In what might be the timeliest Twitter chat recap since #builtheritage launched, I'm sharing highlights from our October 2nd conversation about preservation-friendly conferences just as I am heading off to the National Preservation Conference in Indianapolis. And while that wasn't our only topic -- we also talked about conferences in affiliated fields, unconferences, live-tweeting conference sessions, and more -- it did loom large over the chat.

One key moment of the last chat before the conference every year is the announcement of the annual tweet-up, which as it happens, will be taking place tonight (Wed., October 30). Everyone is welcome, whether you've participated on the chat before or been waiting to meet some of us "IRL" first.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Every year, aside from the dropping temps, there is one clear indicator that fall has arrived: it's time for the National Preservation Conference.

That’s right, we are now less than a month away from our annual conference, which starts on October 29 at the Crossroads of America -- Indianapolis, Indiana.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.

Twitter Chat Recap/Reminder: Historic Schools and Preservation Conferences

Posted on: September 24th, 2013 by Sarah Heffern

 

Ask a preservationist what to do with a historic school building in need of a new life, and the answer is usually a quick one: keep using it as a school. We tend to be passionate advocates for adapting existing buildings to modern needs, and schools are no exception. Of course, given demographic changes to communities over time, it's not always possible to keep the buildings education-focused, in which case adaptive reuse becomes our goal.

This balance between original use and adaptive use -- and how to advocate for either -- was the subject of the September #builtheritage Twitter chat. As always, we had a lively conversation, full of great examples from around the U.S. and Canada. The Storify slides above touch on the highlights of the chat.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Columbus, Indiana: Different by Design

Posted on: August 5th, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

Columbus, Indiana: one of the densest collection of high-calibre modern architecture, it also hosts seven National Historic Landmarks. Credit: Sombraala.
Welcome to Columbus, Indiana, brought to you by the world's most renowned architects.

I.M. Pei, Richard Meier, Eero Saarinen, Harry Weese: the biggest names in modern architecture -- all in the middle of Indiana? Yes, amid the Midwestern plains, Columbus, Indiana stands as a gleaming beacon for modern architecture. The city ranks sixth in the U.S. for architectural importance, according to The American Institute of Architects, just behind cities like Chicago, New York, and Boston.

This fall, the National Trust for Historic Preservation is bringing our annual preservation conference to Indianapolis -- and Saturday, November 2 will be "Columbus Day," full of field sessions to provide a modern architecture fix.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.