Sports

[Historic Bars] Veteran Boxers Association Ring 1 in Philadelphia

Posted on: September 11th, 2014 by Julia Rocchi

 

Preservation Nation continues its tour of historic bars as we slide (or stumble) our way into the musty dugouts that have served as the home bases for sports fans across the nation as they ride the bench and cheer their favorite teams. Next up for America’s historic sports bars: the Veteran Boxers Association Ring 1 in Philadelphia.

The name "Ring 1" marks that the Philadelphia chapter was the first in the country. Credit: Duncan Kendall
The name "Ring 1" marks that the Philadelphia chapter was the first in the country.

When you first walk into the Veteran Boxers Association in the Port Richmond neighborhood of Philadelphia, you’re not sure if you’re in a bar, a clubhouse, or a museum. But after your first drink and a spin around the room, you realize this quirky venue is all three in one.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 


Hinchliffe Stadium’s Art Deco cast concrete construction has long suffered from neglect.

The 1933 Art Deco Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J., is one of the few remaining stadiums in the country associated with Negro League Baseball, and the former home to some of the league’s greatest players and teams.

In connection with today’s community cleanup of Hinchliffe, coordinated by the National Trust, the city of Paterson, and the Hinchliffe Steering Committee, PreservationNation spoke with famed Negro League historian Dr. Larry Hogan about the significance of Hinchliffe Stadium and the legacy of Negro League Baseball.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Hinchliffe Stadium Reveals Baseball’s Hidden History

Posted on: April 15th, 2014 by Guest Writer 5 Comments

 

Written by Adrian Burgos, Jr., Professor, U.S. History, University of Illinois

Graffiti at Hinchliffe Stadium. Credit: DanielLugo, Flickr
Built in 1932, Hinchliffe Stadium is situated near Great Falls, a National Historic Landmark in Paterson, N.J.

Years before Jackie Robinson stepped across the white lines and onto Ebbets Field to make history as major league baseball's integration pioneer, decades before Roberto Clemente displayed his hitting prowess, graceful fielding, and powerful arm on North American baseball diamonds, and well before U.S. baseball fans became acquainted with the high-leg kick of Juan Marichal, the pitching gyrations of Luis Tiant, the prodigious home runs of Orlando Cepeda, other amazing performances of Big Papi David Ortiz, Pedro Martinez, and Manny Ramirez, black baseball fans congregated on Saturdays to watch the Negro League’s premier talent at Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J. -- a historic space where African-American and Latino fans watched some of their own perform during the era of segregated baseball.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

#SaveTheDome Selfies: Showing Love for a National Treasure

Posted on: March 19th, 2014 by Grant Stevens

 


#astrodome #houston #8thWonderOfTheWorld -- @robbmaddox, Robb Maddox

Houston in March means one thing: the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. You name it, and it’s probably happening during the Rodeo's 20-day run. In 2013, over 2.5 million people came to the Rodeo, and each year the concert list is a who’s who of pop and country music performers.

The Rodeo takes place in Reliant Park, home of the Astrodome, and National Trust staff recently noticed something a little out of the ordinary: People are taking selfies with the Astrodome! Below, we’ve compiled some of our favorites for you to enjoy.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

The Palestra: College Hoops’ Most Storied Arena

Posted on: March 18th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

Credit: Ed B, Flickr
The Palestra is famous its raucous atmosphere and for its seating that reaches right to the floor.

There’s a reason why they refer to the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament as March Madness: On top of the fact that the games themselves are crazy, basically the whole country goes wild over it. (When else do you see grown men and women biting their nails and sweating in their offices cubicles over whether to scribble “Dayton” or “Ohio State” on a piece of paper?)

But even with the onset of live-streaming five-game simulcasts and billion-dollar bracket giveaways, the game still has plenty of history to celebrate. Case in point: Philadelphia’s 1927 hoops arena known as the Palestra.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.