National Treasures

Big Win at Pullman Historic District, Now a National Monument!

Posted on: February 19th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

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The Administration Building's clock tower was restored after a 1998 fire.

Moments ago, President Obama designated a portion of Chicago’s Pullman Historic District a National Monument, making it the Windy City’s first unit of the National Park Service. The move comes after decades of work to protect and promote the historic neighborhood by community members and supporters who joined elected officials and the president himself to celebrate the announcement in the heart of Pullman this afternoon.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

10 Iconic Movie Sets Starring … The Antiquities Act!

Posted on: February 19th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

Written by Denise Ryan, Director of Public Lands Policy

An R2-D2 character visits Death Valley (also known as the planet Tatooine in "Star Wars"). Credit: Alyse & Remi, Flickr
An R2-D2 figure visits Death Valley National Park (also known as the planet Tatooine in "Star Wars").

The Antiquities Act may sound like a dusty old piece of legislation, a relic of a bygone era that long ago ceased to have relevance for average Americans. But you will spill your popcorn to learn that the Antiquities Act -- considered America’s first preservation law enacted in 1906 -- continues to play a critical role in protecting places across the country that have been featured in some of Hollywood’s best-known blockbusters.

From “Star Wars” to “Titanic,” from “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” to “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” some of our most beloved movies were filmed in landscapes and historic sites protected by the Antiquities Act. "The Godfather: Part II," "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," and "The Cider House Rules" are all Oscar winners and feature places protected by this little-known law which allow the President to permanently protect federally owned or controlled structures and lands.

On Thursday, February 19, the President will take direct action for the 14th time and establish a new National Monument from a portion of the Pullman Historic District in Chicago. The Pullman neighborhood was featured in the Oscar-winning movies "The Road to Perdition" and "The Fugitive," creating yet another link between great films and iconic American landscapes and historic sites.

Before you settle down this Sunday night to watch the stars walk the red carpet on their way to the 87th Academy Awards, enjoy nine more of our favorite places featured in motion pictures protected and recognized by the Antiquities Act of 1906 -- now including historic Pullman in Chicago!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

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The Palace of the Governors

Where do you think the oldest colonial-era building in the United States is located?

At first glance, you might assume that the oldest ones in the continental United States would be found somewhere near the Jamestown or Roanoke in Virginia, or in Massachusetts, near Plymouth, or other early English settlements along the eastern seaboard, right? The truth is, to find the truly oldest colonial buildings in the country, you need to look westward.

Santa Fe, New Mexico, is the oldest continuously inhabited state capitol in the United States. Founded in 1607 by New Mexico’s second Spanish Governor, Don Pedro de Peralta, as the “City of Holy Faith,” or “Santa Fe” in Spanish, the city has remained the capitol of the province of New Spain, the New Mexico Territory, and eventually the state of New Mexico, for more than 400 years now. And with a pair of structures both built in 1610, Santa Fe also boasts two of the nation’s oldest places: The San Miguel Mission and the Palace of the Governors.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Tom Wall

Tom Wall is the Associate Manager of Community Outreach. His background includes television production, journalism, nonprofit communications, and marketing. Originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, Tom is a graduate of the George Washington University, with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication.

[Q&A] The Chautauqua Amphitheater: An Insider’s Guide

Posted on: February 4th, 2015 by David Weible 1 Comment

 

The Amphitheater's open-air construction is one of its defining characteristics. It's speeches and concerts can be heard for blocks through the warm summer air.

The Amphitheater's open-air construction is one of its defining characteristics. Its speeches and concerts can be heard for blocks through the warm summer air.

Since it opened in 1875, the Chautauqua Institution in western New York has served as one of the great centers for public discourse on the important issues facing American society. And since 1893, the Chautauqua Amphitheater has been at the center of both that discourse and the community of Chautauqua itself.

Last week, as part of an announcement of the Amphitheater as one of our newest National Treasures, we published a Q&A with Vanity Fair architecture critic Paul Goldberger discussing the threat to the 4,000-seat, open-air structure’s historical integrity. This week, we thought we’d follow up with a Q&A with three life-long Chautauquans about what the Amp means to them.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

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Since it opened as a Sunday School in 1875, the Chautauqua Institution has helped spark and sustain a broader movement in education, culture, and spirituality in communities throughout the country. Today, this 750-acre education center on the shores of western New York’s Lake Chautauqua continues to serve as a summertime retreat and intellectual, spiritual, and cultural wellspring.

At the institution’s center is the 1893 Chautauqua Amphitheater, a 4,000-seat, roofed, open air structure internationally recognized as a forum for American culture and history. Its wooden stage has hosted Franklin D. Roosevelt, Susan B. Anthony, Thurgood Marshall, Bobby Kennedy, Ella Fitzgerald, Amelia Earhart, Booker T. Washington, Bill and Hilary Clinton, and Sandra Day O’Connor, to name just a few.

But the building is in jeopardy. Despite a recent delay in the Chautauqua Institution’s decision-making process, there is a chance “the Amp” -- as it’s affectionately known -- may be replaced by a replica structure. In an effort to save the Amp, the National Trust has chosen it as our newest National Treasure.

To get a better sense of just how important the Chautauqua Amphitheater’s survival is, I spoke with Vanity Fair architecture critic and National Trust board member, Paul Goldberger.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.