National Treasures

40 Years After Ship’s Decommission, Nantucket Lightship Beacon Shines Again

Posted on: August 24th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

By Andy Grabel, Associate Director, Public Affairs

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People gather to celebrate the relighting of the Nantucket Lightship.

Witnessing the power of place elicits a special sensation, even if that place has moved up and down the Eastern seaboard and into international waters over the course of eight decades.

On a sunny, summer afternoon and breezy evening in the Boston Harbor, the connection of visitors from near and far to Nantucket Lightship/LV-112 was electric, both literally and figuratively. Crewmen who served on the ship half a century ago returned to the vessel and joined more than 200 preservationists to tour its restoration and to celebrate the lighting of its beacon for the first time since it was decommissioned in 1975.

The U.S. Lightship Museum’s preservation project, made possible by a $250,000 grant from American Express, restored the ship’s navigational light beacon, foghorn, and on-board electrical systems.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

National Treasure Pauli Murray House Receives Generous Donation From Iron Mountain Inc.

Posted on: August 21st, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

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The house in Durham, North Carolina, where Pauli Murray grew up with her grandparents and aunt, is in the process of being restored.

On Monday, August 17, the Pauli Murray Center for History and Social Justice and Iron Mountain Inc., the data storage and management company, announced a new partnership that will work to establish the Pauli Murray House, a National Treasure of the National Trust, as a national historic site.

The partnership includes a generous contribution from Iron Mountain that will help preserve the house’s foundation and fund brick-and-mortar restoration work. Once work is completed, the Pauli Murray Center will use the space to honor Pauli Murray's legacy and create social justice programming for students and the community.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Explore These West Coast Asian-American Heritage Sites

Posted on: August 13th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn No Comments

 

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Seattle’s Panama Hotel has continuously operated as a hotel since it was first constructed, and the first floor holds a tea room that’s open to the public.

What makes the six-story Panama Hotel in Seattle, one of our National Treasures, so special? We could start with the fact that, despite being built in 1910, it's remained remarkably intact over the years, and its basement houses the best surviving example in the U.S. of an urban Japanese-style bath house, or sento. It was designed by Sabro Ozasa, thought to be the first Japanese-American architect to practice in Seattle. And perhaps most powerfully, it still holds the belongings, like trunks, suitcases, and boxes, of Japanese Americans incarcerated in “relocation centers” during World War II.

While Asian American/Pacific Islander historic sites can be found all over the country, we’re taking cues from the National Park Service and highlighting a few West Coast examples that tell the story of centuries of Chinese-American and Japanese-American history. We hope that if you’re ever in that neck of the woods, you’ll take the time to experience the powerful stories they have to tell.  Make your way down from Seattle to Fremont, California, and check out these sites along the way.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Palace of the Governors: A Time Capsule of Santa Fe’s Diverse History

Posted on: August 5th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

By Kirsten Hower

Indian Detours personnel group photo with Harvey cars lined up in front of Palace, c. 1926 - 1930.
Indian Detours personnel group photo with Harvey cars lined up in front of the Palace of the Governors, c. 1926 - 1930.

Located in the heart of downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico, the Palace of the Governors is one of the oldest, in-use public building in the United States. Once the seat of power, the Palace now showcases the diverse and colorful history of Santa Fe and its peoples. This Exposure slideshow takes you on a virtual tour of this unique historic place.


Palace of the Governors by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Have A Whale Of A Time In New Bedford, Massachusetts

Posted on: August 3rd, 2015 by Katherine Flynn No Comments

 

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The New Bedford Whaling Museum (right) tells the global story of whales and whaling, and is open daily.

What do novelist Herman Melville, abolitionist Frederick Douglass, and two members of the ‘90’s hip-hop group Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch have in common?

We won’t leave you hanging: All of the above have ties to New Bedford, Massachusetts, either living or working in the city at some point in their lives. (Melville and Douglass came to New Bedford later in life, while the two Funky Bunch members, Hector Barros and Scott Ross, are New Bedford natives.) The city of about 95,000, located right on the state’s Buzzards Bay, is rife with whaling history, as well as abolitionist and African-American heritage.

Check out our list of highlights of some of the amazing cultural and historical experiences that New Bedford has to offer, including nine historic districts and the oldest continuously operating jail in the United States. (Plus, it's home to the First Baptist Church, one of our National Treasures.) You’re guaranteed to leave with good vibrations.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

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More than a century after its construction, Seattle's single-room-occupancy Panama Hotel continues to evoke the lifestyle and culture of Japanese-Americans during the early part of the 20th century. Its current owner, Jan Johnson, has preserved the building, along with its Japanese-style bath house and collection of belongings stored by Japanese-Americans incarcerated during World War II.

A National Treasure of the National Trust, the Panama Hotel, has many stories to tell, and producers Laine Ross and David Vice of Seattle's Big Story Group have set out to capture as many of them as they can. Through their Panama Hotel Legacy Film project, the duo hope to honor the history of the hotel, its occupants, and its owner as the property looks for new ownership and continued preservation.

We spoke with Ross and Vice for their take on the project, the hotel, and the importance of preserving our shared history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.