Historic Real Estate: The White Clapboard Edition

Posted on: October 11th, 2013 by Emily Potter 1 Comment

blog_photo_John Howland Wood Mansion
You'll have plenty of room for entertaining in this grand house -- eight bedrooms, two kitchens, and four fireplaces ensure there is space for everyone.

John Howland Wood Mansion -- Bayside, Texas

The Wood House was built in 1875 for John Howland Wood, a soldier, rancher, merchant, and civic leader in Texas. His magnificent home is one of the most substantial and least altered country mansions in post-Civil War Texas. It is a true piece of history, as the mansion was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983 and became a Texas Historic Landmark in 1998. Price: $1,495,000

blog_photo_Bellevue
Step onto the Bellevue plantation and be transported back in time as you walk through its grounds, the greenhouse, a Greek temple, and more.

Bellevue -- Accokeek, Md.

Bellevue is a remarkable example of a small plantation from the early 19th century. In addition to the five-bedroom, five-bathroom house on the gated, 10-acre property, there is also an orangery, folly (Grecian temple), and a guest house. The beautifully landscaped grounds, stone walkways, and open green space make the private estate a peaceful respite from nearby busy city life. Price: $899,000

blog_photo_Charles M. Ball Home
One hour from the Tulsa airport, this home offers many elegant features, including a beautiful oak staircase, stone fireplaces, and a brick patio with a water fountain.

Charles M. Ball Home -- Coffeyville, Kan.

Mr. Ball was the Condon National Bank employee who interrupted the infamous last Dalton Gang Bank raid on October 5, 1892, by telling the robbers the safe would not be open for another 10 minutes. His more than 4,000-square-foot home has been carefully restored and maintained, including the third floor suite, perfect for a rental apartment or bed and breakfast. Price: $282,500

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

Real Estate

One Response

  1. Gaurav Rajput

    October 14, 2013

    Good design of white house and providing the good facility.Thanks