It Takes a Village: How Boise, Idaho is Celebrating its Sesquicentennial

Posted on: September 23rd, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

The BOISE 150 SESQUI-PARTY on July 7, 2013 commemorated the 150th anniversary of the first platting of Boise. An estimated 16,000-20,000 people attended and were treated to performances at four different staging areas by local musicians, cultural groups, dancers, storytellers, and more -- it was a great party!
The BOISE 150 SESQUI-PARTY on July 7, 2013 commemorated the 150th anniversary of the first platting of Boise. An estimated 16,000-20,000 people attended and were treated to performances at four different staging areas by local musicians, cultural groups, dancers, storytellers, and more.

This year, Boise, the capital city of Idaho, celebrates its 150th anniversary. Explorers and missionaries began arriving in the Boise River's fertile valley in the early 1800s. The U.S. military established Fort Boise on July 4, 1863. By 1867, the town consisted of 140 blocks and its population almost tripled between 1900 and 1910.

Throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, Boise grew in population, economy, and culture. Hewlett-Packard and Micron Technology led the city in technological advancements, while the environment -- the Boise Foothills, River, and surrounding desert -- enjoys preservation. Today, Boise’s creative energy and artistic entrepreneurship continues to move the city forward.

The Boise City Department of Arts & History led the effort to commemorate Boise’s 150th anniversary -- or sesquicentennial -- in 2013, which evolved into a wide-scale initiative: BOISE 150. With support from the mayor and city council members, a small but passionate crew comprised of city staff, contractors, volunteers, and grantees developed an array of programs to celebrate Boise’s past, present, and collective future.

Want to see how the whole city is in on the act? Check out the BOISE 150 slideshow after the jump.

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Read more about the BOISE 150 events on the Preservation Leadership Forum blog.

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Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

Civic, Revitalization, Slideshows