Vanity Fair: Paul Goldberger on the Fight to Save Chicago's Prentice Hospital

Posted on: August 15th, 2012 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 6 Comments

If you haven't ever seen Prentice Women's Hospital, the Modernist concrete structure that opened in Chicago in 1975, you can head to the Windy City -- or visit SavingPlaces.org, the new National Trust website about America's National Treasures.

There you'll discover that Prentice is much-loved and much-admired, but threatened with demolition by Northwestern University -- which is why the Trust is battling to save it alongside an impressive list of world-famous architects and Chicago-area preservation groups.

This week Paul Goldberger, the Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic (and National Trust board member since 2005) penned a blog post for Vanity Fair magazine where he serves as a contributing editor.  His post brilliantly captures Prentice's significance, and underscores the case for saving the innovative cloverleaf hospital.

Read it here: Paul Goldberger on the Fight to Save Chicago's Prentice Hospital.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Modern Architecture, National Treasures

6 Responses

  1. Vanity Fair: Paul Goldberger on the Fight to Save Chicago’s Prentice Hospital « Speaking Vintage…

    August 15, 2012

    [...] Vanity Fair: Paul Goldberger on the Fight to Save Chicago’s Prentice Hospital. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:LikeBe the first to like this. [...]

  2. T Edelstein

    August 16, 2012

    I wish to sign the petition to Save Prentice Hospital in Chicago. This Landmark building should be saved.

  3. felix kos

    August 16, 2012

    Prentiss is just the tip of the iceberg in what will be a commercial demolition derby of existing buildings that are debt-riddled hulks of a bygone-era. The next five years will see all commercial buildings in the 45-50 year age group come down in a hailstorm of new development. Raise your glass to the new and improved … preservation is DEAD!

  4. James Martin

    August 24, 2012

    Felix,

    Sorry to spoil you glee but nothing could be further from the truth. The preservation movement is stronger now than it has ever been.
    Add this the dawning reality that reuse of building is simply the most ecological option in building. We can no longer afford to bulldoze and build from scratch, it is a blatant waste of resources. The evidence is indisputable, new development is now more and more being tied to reuse. I think the time of short term capital investment in building has seen its day.

  5. Shanita Anderson

    August 26, 2012

    I totaly agree with James Martin in that the ideology of adaptive reuse IS the most responsible, logical, economical and intelligent way to think about new development for the future of our environment, which includes the preservation of human health and the preservation of our country’s rich architectual history. The preservation movement has grown over the years and will continue to grow as we see our environment’s health decline further.

  6. Judith Roth

    August 27, 2012

    Is there a petition to save Prentice
    that people could sign? If not – let’s get one going!