Preservation Round-Up: Demolition Edition

Posted on: June 25th, 2012 by David Garber 1 Comment

Did we hook you with that title? As our regular readers know, we at the National Trust are absolutely not in the business of condoning demolition. So we couldn't help but notice the provocatively titled 25 Buildings to Demolish Right Now list put out by California Home + Design last week.

Take a look at the list -- and the other articles we share today -- and let us know: What do you think could be done with these sites (particularly the historic ones)?


The Geisel Library at University of California San Diego made California Home + Design's list of "25 Buildings to Demolish Right Now." Those are some dramatic angles!

25 Buildings to Demolish Right Now -- California Home + Design

"When proportion, balance, form and function come together in a delicate harmony, architecture is nothing short of an art form. But when, on occasion, those principles clash, the results can be eye-searingly awful. We asked 15 architects and our own staff to weigh-in on what buildings, given the chance, they'd take a wrecking ball to."

The Real High Line Effect: A Transformational Triumph of Preservation and Design -- The Huffington Post

"The success of New York's High Line -- a stretch of abandoned elevated railroad on New York's West Side that has undergone a Phoenix-like resurrection to become one of the city's most popular destinations -- has generated much conversation about the so-called "High Line effect." Several cities are looking at their own long-disused sections of track, hoping they can literally replicate New York's success. Perhaps, but that narrow interpretation ignores the confluence of unique factors that made New York's High Line an instant classic."

Revitalizing Neighborhoods: Over-the-Rhine -- Metro Jacksonville

"Metro Jacksonville visits what is believed to be the largest most intact urban historic district in the United States: Cincinnati's Over-the-Rhine. [...] What's slowly taking place in Over-the-Rhine indicates that when a city invests in itself and quality-of-life, privately financed market rate development tends to follow."

Renovated, Repurposed Buildings in Massachusetts -- Boston.com

"Boston is well-known as a historical city -- the Cradle of Liberty produced some sturdy buildings. If one goes into disrepair, there are numerous restoration societies that aim to keep the city's historic buildings up and running. Here’s a look at some of Boston's renovated and repurposed buildings where the outside is the same, but the inside is very different."

Texan Lighthouses a Preservation of History -- Galveston Daily News

"Mention the state of Texas and it brings to mind barbecue, the Alamo, football, real cowboys, longhorns, spring break, astronauts, big hats and lighthouses. Lighthouses? Maine and North Carolina have lighthouses, but Texas? The truth is that about 90 lighthouses and lightships have dotted the Texas coast through the years, guiding mariners through barrier island gaps into thriving ports at Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Indianola, Galveston, Houston and Beaumont."

 

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One Response

  1. frenchjr25

    July 3, 2012

    I can easily see why a few of these structures could be considered for demolition.

    BUT buildings like the Phillip Burton Federal Building in San Francisco can easily be redone. I live a few block away from it. Replacing the windows with a modern design would go a long way.

    Not everything has to be demolished. Re-purposing and redesigning can go a long ways. The problem in the US is that we are all about building new. Time for this to change.