Preservation Round-Up: The Barn from Charlotte's Web Edition

Posted on: April 23rd, 2012 by David Garber 2 Comments


A classic red New England barn. (Photo: Lost-In-Maylene on Flickr)

Celebrating 60 Years of ‘Charlotte’s Web’ - The New York Times

"The barn was very large. It was very old. For more than a century before E. B. White and his wife, Katharine, purchased the farm in 1933, the barn had stood on a rise above Allen Cove, Me., near the village of North Brooklin. For White, the barn was the center of their 40 acres, even more so than the big white house that was attached to it by an aromatic woodshed. The building united White’s two great writerly loves -- barnyard animals and Maine."

America’s Oldest Net-Zero Home - Natural Home & Garden

"Turning a century-old Victorian house into a net-zero home might sound like an ambitious goal for a young couple in their first home, but Kelly and Matt Grocoff, a self-described “average couple” from Ann Arbor, Michigan, did just that, and now own the oldest home in America to achieve net-zero energy."

Preserving history, or the 1 percent? - Salon

"Restricting development in pricey neighborhoods, the new thinking goes, not only cements a city’s best sections as enclaves for the rich, it has wider anti-urban reverberations. It promotes suburbanization by pricing out the middle class. It prevents densification, the greenest, most efficient use of space and the defining characteristic of cities. And less density makes walkable, retail- and transit-oriented neighborhoods harder to sustain."

On Block in Harlem, Neighbors’ Push for Restoration Will End in Demolition - The New York Times

"Gentrification, or at the very least prettification, has reshaped block after block in Harlem, but it has not fully arrived at East 126th Street between Madison and Park Avenues. There, handsome rows of century-and-a-half-old brownstones line the north and south sides of the street, just as they do one block west, on a pristine tree-lined stretch where homeowners keep polished doorknobs and spotless front stoops. But along East 126th Street, vacant buildings are interspersed among the inhabited ones."

The Distinctive City - Urban Land

"If I have learned anything from my career in urban planning, it is this: a community’s appeal drives economic prosperity. I have also learned that, while change is inevitable, the destruction of a community’s unique character and identity is not. Progress does not demand degraded surroundings. Communities can grow without destroying the things that people love."

Cleveland's past and present merge in repurposed, grand old buildings - Cleveland.com

"Every day I come to work and I'm inspired to put as much care into my food as they put in this building," says Schimoler, chef and owner of Crop. "This place cost $1.5 million to build in 1925, and these days it would cost $30 million. Who could ever build something like this these days, especially to house a restaurant?"

Taking Guardianship of a Historic Home - The Wall Street Journal

"More than anything, owners of historic homes buy for love. Love of the artisanship, architectural details and even the quirks. Still, it’s a smart investment. A landmark plaque on a residence increases property value. It assures buyers the qualities that attracted them to the home in the first place will endure over time."

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

General, News Round-Ups

2 Responses

  1. Kaitlin

    April 24, 2012

    Excellent group of articles; lots of issues to ponder for further discussion. thank you!

  2. Eden

    April 24, 2012

    Thanks for these! Especially the one from Salon – I’ll be interested to read it