Preservation Round-Up: Hockey's Oldest Arenas Edition

Posted on: March 15th, 2012 by David Garber 1 Comment


Toronto's old Maple Leaf Gardens arena is now home to a grocery store and smaller university arena. (Photo: Derek Flack, BlogTO)

The Changing Fate of Hockey's Oldest Arenas - The Atlantic Cities

"In a league that cherishes tradition, the half-dozen franchises that comprised the entire NHL until its 1967 expansion are held in particularly high regard, seen as the cultural and historic pillars of the league. With that image comes an equally significant aura to the grounds that once hosted them. Sadly, only two of these six arenas still stand, both in Canada."

And this follow-up...

Finding a reuse for historic arenas - Preservation Alliance of Minnesota

"This article from Atlantic Cities about the fate of a number of the arenas for the “Original 6″ teams in the NHL caught my eye because I am a diehard Boston Bruins fan and one of my strongest childhood memories is being in a car, driving past the half-demolished Boston Garden. Some may have marveled at the sight of this monumental building ripped half open to the world, still able to see the remaining seats in the arena, was pretty cool, I was heartbroken."

Show Us The Thumping, Pulsing 'Heart' Of Your City - NPR

"From the coffee shop on the corner to the park down the street, all urbanites have a place they think of as the heart of their city. It's where you go when you want to feel like a citizen of Memphis, New York City or San Francisco. It's the place you think of as synonymous with Atlanta, Washington, D.C., or Portland, Ore. It's what you talk about when someone asks, "What's Chicago like?" And even if your local office of tourism has never heard of it, we want to know what and where it is."

National Cathedral's preservation needs top $50M - US News & World Report

"[The] Episcopal cathedral is facing one of the worst financial binds of its 105-year-old history. An earthquake in August severely damaged its intricate stone work and architecture, with repair costs estimated at $20 million. Aside from that damage, the structure faces $30 million in preexisting preservation needs."

Paul Rudolph-Brutalist Landmark in Danger of Demolition - Architizer

"In less than one month’s time, a committee will vote to decide the future of Paul Rudolph’s seminal 1971 Orange County Government Center. The Brutalist building, a masterful essay in sectional composition, has never quite performed as intended by Rudolph, who designed the structure with 80-plus roof planes that have leaked without fail ever since the center’s opening."

On Demolition and Historic Districts - Geneva Patch

"It is easy to be a good citizen when everyone is fat and happy with a strong economy. It is harder when economic conditions force these unpleasant choices to the table. Demolition is a one-way trip. Just because the economy is down does not make a property less historically valuable."

Micropolitan Manifesto: A Call to Radically Remake and Revitalize Our Smallest Cities - Urban Escapee

"This is a manifesto about cities and business, but certainly not business-as-usual. It’s a belief in building community, resurrecting place, and making a difference in the world. Most of all, it’s about ambition, creativity, and people."

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

General, News Round-Ups, Sports

One Response

  1. Steven W Lindsey

    March 15, 2012

    Don’t forget Sault Ste Marie, Mi.’s Pullar Stadium!

    —SWL