Preservation Roundup: Recreating Public Space in Brooklyn, Modernism in Biscayne Bay, March Madness and the Spectrum

Posted on: March 16th, 2009 by Matt Ringelstetter

(Bloomberg)

Art, People, Triumph Over Traffic in $23 Million Brooklyn Rehab: Demolished in the 1960's to make way for Robert Moses' highways, a public plaza near the Manhattan Bridge is being reborn by artist Brian Tolle.  Tolle is recreating the allegorical figures representing Manhattan and Brooklyn that once sat at the entrance to the bridge and were designed by Daniel Chester French. [Bloomberg]

Circle and District: Burleigh's descriptions of 18th century Cairo stand out. She writes that the city was "a labyrinthine metropolis that frustrated and confused the invaders." It was "a city of doors, mostly closed." [BLDGBLOG]

Morris Lapidus House in Biscayne Bay: WSJ magazine features a rare Miami home designed by modernist architect Morris Lapidus. Complete with some very cool photos. [WSJ Magazine]

Book Review: Saving Places that Matter: A Citizens Guide to the National Historic Preservation Act. [NTHS Blog]

Goodbye to the Spectrum: The Spectrum in Philadelphia hosted its final basketball game over the weekend as the Sixers defeated the Chicago Bulls in overtime. Sports arenas and stadiums are often difficult to preserve for a variety of reasons, so we're often only left with the memories they once hosted. It being mid-March (the most wonderful time of the year) it's easy to look back fondly at some of the biggest moments in NCAA Tournament history that took place within "America's Showplace." Two individuals in particular stand out when combining NCAA and the Spectrum: Bobby Knight and Christian Laettner.
Knight won two of his three NCAA Championships in the arena, leading the last team to post an overall undefeated record to the title in 1976. Five years later he brought Isiah Thomas and the Hoosiers to the Spectrum and defeated Dean Smith's North Carolina Tarheels. The Spectrum also played host to what is often considered the greatest game in NCAA Tournament history, as Christian Laettner hit a jumper with two seconds left in overtime to defeat Kentucky in 1992, sending the Blue Devils to the final four on the way to their second straight title.

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