Preservation Roundup: Historic Google Earth, Levels of Sustainability, Artificial Landscapes

Posted on: February 9th, 2009 by Matt Ringelstetter

Historic Google Earth: Google's mapping tools are among the coolest and most innovative on the web today. The folks at the Googleplex are at it again, this time updating their Google Earth tool to include historical images, allowing users to view how specific locations have changed over time. [Digital Urban]

Junk Boni: A "junk bonus" of about 2,500 Euro has been established in Germany in an effort to stimulate the nation's auto industry. Trade in your beat up old VW and get some cash that could go towards a more eco-friendly car. Sounds like a great idea, but hold on, does this compare at all to scrapping old "inefficient" buildings in order to build new "green" ones in their place? [anArchitecture]

Preservation Day at the Capitol: Is quickly approaching. Preservation Kentucky outlines the day's schedule. [Preservation Kentucky]

The Lincoln Bicentennial: Celebration continues as Jeffrey Larry, Preservation Manager at President Lincoln's Cottage, will discuss Lincoln’s life while residing at the Cottage and the architectural history of the building. If you're in the Baltimore area, be sure to check it out. [President Lincoln's Cottage Blog]

Levels of Sustainability: "...There are two sustainabilities and we are only thinking about one of them. We think about the material, but we don’t think about the economy. How do you make a sustainable economy based on sustainabile practices?" Vince Michael from Time Tells examines the affect of sustainable building practices on the economy. [TimeTells]

New Urban Rainforests: Are better than no rainforests at all? "Designed for the heart of Sentul, Kuala Lumpur, TROPICOOL @ KL envisions a series of self-sustaining mushroom skyscrapers that incorporate natural energy sources, rainwater harvesting, and bio-mass support for off-the-grid living in a truly green environment." [Inhabitat]

Artificial Hills of Berlin: In post-WWII Germany, with most of the men still occupied with other commitments, it was the women (nicknamed Trummerfrauen or "rubble women") who set to work cleaning the bombed-out streets. The rubble had to be put somewhere, and waste materials were often transported to outlying areas creating hills known as Schuttberg or Trummerberg. Over time, these hills of debris have been covered with grass and vegetation, rendering them indistinguishable from other, more "natural" landscape formations. [Pruned]

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