My Historic Washington: Takoma

Posted on: January 12th, 2009 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments
Our farmers' market, where we shop for fresh produce along side of Fox Man and the Purple People.

Our farmers' market, where we shop for fresh produce along side of Fox Man and the Purple People.

Confession: My husband likes to ride a unicycle, and I have amassed a large collection of strollers on the front porch of our 1913 bungalow. But in Takoma, located at the top of the diamond-shaped Washington, D.C., we’re hardly the most eccentric neighbors on the block.

Takoma - with its vegetarian restaurants, thrift shops, well-tended old houses and streets named for trees - seems far removed from the power corridor of downtown Washington, D.C., but it’s only 15 minutes away by subway.

In the 1960s and ‘70s, Vietnam War protesters settled in the area, painting its houses bright, unconventional colors like orange and lime green. Some of those hippies never left. Visit the farmers’ market on Sunday - which just marked its 25th year - and you’ll see regulars like a bearded man carrying a fox pelt in a trap as a form of protest against animal cruelty. We call him the Fox Man. And then there's the Purple People, a family who wear dark purple robes, live in a purple house and drive a purple Mini Cooper.

There are mainstream people here, too. People like my husband and I, who moved out of a downtown apartment to a house with transom windows and a porch swing. A laid-back, anything-goes spirit trickles down to Takoma’s architecture - Victorian houses without modern additions, bungalows painted day-glo yellow, and yes, a few unicycles and strollers on those front porches.

Everyone is welcome here. For this reason and so many more, historic Takoma is my Washington. If you make your way to D.C. for the inauguration, I invite you to come see a side of the city that is as far from K Street as you can get.

– Margaret Foster

Margaret Foster is the online editor for Preservation magazine. Stay tuned leading up to the inauguration as more National Trust staffers share their stories about the greater D.C. area. Coming to town for the historic event? Be sure to visit our new Preservationist’s Guide to Washington.

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National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

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2 Responses

  1. Katie

    January 13, 2009

    It is nice to see stories about our old neighborhood in the States. Thanks for sharing such great view of the odd, yet great part of living in Takoma Park!

  2. Ellen

    January 15, 2009

    Margaret has captured the essence of our town in this charming piece. What a great article to share with family and friends who may not know what a gem Takoma Park really is-keep them coming!