Preservation Roundup: Preservation and the Economy, Preserving the Pre-Historic, Modernism and Undulating Brick

Posted on: November 10th, 2008 by Matt Ringelstetter

Preserving the Pre-Historic: You may have heard of such initiatives promoting the preservation of the modern and recent past, well how about projects that worked towards preserving the exact opposite--all while incorporating modern design and materials? Earth Architecture provides some interesting photos from a 1930's project to protect Casa Grande Ruins National Monument. " Perhaps nowhere is the blending of modernity and tradition more evident than at the Casa Grande Ruins National Monument. Casa Grande was constructed between AD 1200-1450 by the Native American Hohokam near Phoenix, Arizona. In 1892, President Benjamin Harrison created the Casa Grande Ruin Reservation to protect the one of a kind "Casa Grande", or Great House, thus becoming the first prehistoric and cultural site to be established in the United States." [Earth Architecture]

Saving the Economy with Preservation: "Think about it historically – preservation was rife in the Great Depression in places like Charleston and Greenwich Village. This was the time of sweat equity, and that community-oriented effort continued into the 1960s and gave us the modern preservation movement: a movement about communities taking control of their environment." [Time Tells]

Undulating Brick Walls: "A brick is a modular masonry unit, something that wouldn't appear to "want to be" composed into undulating surfaces. Of course this doesn't stop architects from trying, from using limitations as inspiration and opportunities for doing something new." Daily Dose uses some examples from modern architecture to show the innovative ways in which architects have attempted to bend and shape brick walls and forms outside of their supposed 'naturally' flat state of being. [Daily Dose of Architecture]

Montpelier Restoration Update: The grand opening has come and gone, but restoration work continues at the National Trust Historic Site. [Montpelier Restoration Updates]

Dude, Where's My Car?: A former impound lot in downtown Minneapolis could find new life as "multi-unit housing and a corporate campus." [Star Tribune]

21st Century Street Designers Reimagine 4th Ave and 9th: "Transportation Alternatives announced three winners today in their "Designing the 21st Century Street," competition, which sought new visions for the heavily-trafficked intersection of 4th Avenue and 9th Street in Park Slope. The intersection is notoriously dreary and annoying, with pedestrians coming from the east forced to cross several lanes of traffic to get to the shabby elevated F station, which will be renovated someday maybe, the MTA swears." [Gothamist]

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