Tulsa Poster Presentations: Phillips 66 Stations: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Posted on: October 23rd, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Preservation Conference is this week in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Staff members from around the National Trust for Historic Preservation will be blogging from the conference and sharing their experiences. Priya Chhaya, program assistant for training & online services in the Center for Preservation Leadership, is in the Exhibit Hall checking out the poster presentations.

The Phillips 66 poster project, full view.

The Phillips 66 poster project, full view.

I had just had some amazing fudge at the Bryant Pecan Company booth, while coveting some of those shirts from Vintage Roadside (Lori & Susan blogged about them a few days ago), when I ran across Mike Kertok in front of his poster on the Phillips 66 Stations. While he’s putting up sections of his project he tells me how the first station and subsequent ones from 1927-1938 were built in the cottage style before changing over into more boxy, modernistic structures.

A closeup of the Phillips 66 poster presentation.

A closeup of the Phillips 66 poster presentation.

His passion for these stations is clear from the images on the bulletin board, and his story of how he went from restoring one to completing three full restorations with a fourth in progress is interesting. In addition to his own personal works he began documenting the stations from this period and found that there are about 80-90 still in existence. Some are falling apart, others are pristine and a few are -- as Mike says --  "ugly," but you can learn all about them by reading a report he’s put together on where these stations reside. By reading his poster I learned that there are four categories: company stations, marketing stations, re-branded stations, and "others." If you’re in Tulsa you can see one of these stations, which opened in 1931 at 6th and Elgin. It operated as a Phillips 66 station under various leases until the early 1970s. It was restored in 2007. If you’re in Tulsa you can see his poster in the exhibit hall. For more information you can email Mike at: kertokmb [at] netscape [dot] net. *

-- Priya Chhaya

* Replace the bracketed words with the corresponding symbols, and viola! It's a proper email address.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Conferences