Notes from New Orleans: Effects of Gustav

Posted on: September 10th, 2008 by Walter Gallas
Karnofsky/Morris Music Store, South Rampart St.

Karnofsky/Morris Music Store, South Rampart St.

Friday afternoon, Michelle Kimball of the Preservation Resource Center and I drove through parts of Central City, Uptown, and Mid-City looking for buildings in dangerous condition or which had collapsed as a result of Gustav. In the Central Business District, on South Rampart Street I saw that the brick parapet of one of the remaining buildings associated with jazz history—the Karnofsky/Morris Music store—had fallen. I emailed the Historic District Landmarks Commission about it. According to the New Orleans Jazz Commission, "The Karnofsky Store was the location for both the business and residence of the Jewish family that served as an alternate household for a young Louis Armstrong. He worked on their coal and junk wagon and ate meal with them on a regular basis. Morris Music, the city's first jazz record store, was initially run at this location by their son, and Louis' boyhood friend, Morris Karnofsky." The building is owned by the Meraux Foundation. It is up the street from the Eagle Saloon, the building which PopAgee Johnson purchased from the Meraux’s to form the basis of a long-anticipated New Orleans Jazz Music Hall of Fame.

The House on 100 block of North Gayoso St.

The House on 100 block of North Gayoso St.

In Mid-City, a house in the 100 block of North Gayoso had folded up into a cock-eyed heap. Some neighbors think the house had been elevated after Katrina.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

General