Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

Columbia School, a Rosenwald School in West Columbia, Texas. (Photo courtesy Fisk University, Franklin Library Special Collection)
Columbia School, a Rosenwald School in West Columbia, Texas.

"Maya Angelou and Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) are among the alumni of the constellation of schools created by the partnership between former slave and Tuskegee Institute founder Booker T. Washington and Sears Roebuck catalogue magnate Julius Rosenwald. The schools are celebrated in the documentary 'Rosenwald,' by Washington filmmaker Aviva Kempner...Mostly shuttered in 1954 upon desegregation, many Rosenwald schools were lost to neglect or ruin, but many, such as Ridgeley, have been restored as cultural museums and community centers so that their exceptional legacy can be shared." -- Washington Post: The enlightening legacy of the Rosenwald schools

"No museum is devoted to the region’s deep involvement, according to James DeWolf Perry VI, a direct descendant of the most prolific slave-trading family in the United States’ early years and a co-editor of a book called 'Interpreting Slavery at Museums and Historic Sites.' He is helping to plan the museum and reconciliation center, which are still in the organizing and fund-raising phases. They are to be housed at the 200-year-old stone Cathedral of St. John, the seat of the Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island. Because of dwindling membership, the majestic but deteriorating cathedral was closed in 2012." -- New York Times: Rhode Island Church Taking Unusual Step to Illuminate Its Slavery Role... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Equalization Schools: A Lesson in Education and Civil Rights

Posted on: September 3rd, 2015 by Guest Writer No Comments

 

By Sophia Dembling

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The banks of windows, flat roof, and brick veneer of the Sullivan Street Elementary School in Greenville County, South Carolina are typical design attributes of post-WWII school design.

For a historian, it doesn’t get much better than stumbling on a hitherto unexplored corner of history. For a budding historian -- even better yet.

It happened to Rebekah Dobrasko while she was pursuing a master’s degree in public history at the University of South Carolina in Columbia. She even coined a phrase to describe her rediscovery: equalization schools, or schools built in the 1950s for African-American children in a last-ditch effort to stave off integration in the south.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

[Historic Bars] Baltimore’s The Horse You Came In On Saloon

Posted on: September 3rd, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 2 Comments

 

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The Horse You Came In On is Maryland’s only bar to operate before, during, and after Prohibition.

The Horse You Came In On Saloon, located in Baltimore’s Fell's Point Historic District, is the only bar in America that can boast the dual attractions of live music every night of the week and the ghost of Edgar Allan Poe.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

Written by Jeff Lunden

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The facade of ICA-Art Conservation’s office in the Vitrolite Building.

The Fall 2015 issue of Preservation magazine features a story on the conservation and restoration of the King Sculpture Court ceiling and clerestory at Oberlin College’s Allen Memorial Art Museum. The museum chose Cleveland-based ICA-Art Conservation to lead this project, which seemed only fitting.

In 1952, six Midwestern museums, including the Allen, founded ICA as a nonprofit, and during the 1980s and ‘90s it was housed in the museum’s Postmodern wing. ICA moved to the historic Vitrolite building in Cleveland’s Detroit Shoreway neighborhood in 2003, where it conserves and restores paintings, paper, textiles, and objects, primarily for Midwestern clients.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Muntins

Posted on: September 2nd, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 2 Comments

 

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You can learn a lot about historic buildings from their windows. Taken as a whole, the windows offer character and soul, while their individual parts are equally interesting on their own.

Take, for example, muntins. The Trust for Architectural Easements Glossary of Architectural Terms defines muntins as:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

The original version of this post appeared on August 22, 2012.

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Preservationists in Phoenix and beyond rallied to save the David & Gladys Wright House when it faced demolition in 2012.

In the architecture world, no name carries more weight than Frank Lloyd Wright. But, as a dispute in Phoenix Arizona shows, the name alone does not protect iconic buildings from demolition threats. A 1952 Arcadia home built for Wright’s son, David Wright, was in danger of being torn down a few years ago by then-current owners, the 8081 Meridian Corporation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.