Historic Real Estate: Victorian Edition

Posted on: November 21st, 2014 by Geoff Montes No Comments

 

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This restored 1897 Victorian home is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Serendipity Acres Sugar Grove, North Carolina

Nestled in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains, this three-acre property is adjacent to Pisgah National Forest, making it ideal for a family that enjoys outdoor activities such as camping, hiking, fishing, or rock climbing. The elegant Victorian home was built in 1897 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Spread across 3,000 square feet, the home contains 5 bedrooms and 2.5 baths. Previous owners retained the original wood floor on the main level, which consists of a parlor, formal dining room, den, kitchen, and “keeping room” with four gas fireplaces; the four bedrooms on the second level also have their own fireplaces. The fifth bedroom is located in the finished attic and boasts impressive views of the surrounding valley. Two gazebos, two attached livestock sheds, and a creek round out the property. Price: $549,000... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

[Historic Bars] Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar in New Orleans

Posted on: November 20th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Did George Washington really sleep here? In our next round of Historic Bars, we're stopping at the crossroads of time and history to explore old taverns and inns around the country -- the kind with wooden signs, rooms for lodging, and a century (or two) of fascinating stories. Next in line: Lafitte's Blacksmith Shop Bar in New Orleans.

Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar is estimated to have been built between 1722 and 1732.
Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar is estimated to have been built between 1722 and 1732.

A powerful purple “voodoo” drink and a healthy dose of pirate history are just two great reasons to visit Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar, located on New Orleans’ storied Bourbon Street.

Hailed as possibly the oldest bar in the United States and most definitely the oldest building currently in use as a bar, Lafitte’s is housed in a French-built structure that dates from roughly 1722 -- the details, like so much of New Orleans lore, are sketchy.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Ruth Abram: Explaining Today through Stories of Yesterday

Posted on: November 19th, 2014 by Guest Writer 4 Comments

 

Written by Sophia Dembling

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Left: Ruth Abram, former president and now trustee emerita of the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. Right: Museum visitors enjoy a guided tour.

Ruth Abram believes museums can and should be more than repositories of the past; they should also provide insight into the present and inspire hope for the future.

That was Abram's vision in 1992, when she co-founded (with Anita Jacobsen) the Lower East Side Tenement Museum (a National Trust Historic Site) in New York City, one of the most interesting museums in a city full of them. Past president and now trustee emerita, Abram leaves the running of the museum to others these days ("I don't fiddle," she says. "They're doing a great job."), but remains busy with other projects, including Sites of Conscience and Behold! New Lebanon, a living museum being developed in the rural New York town where Abram lives.

We caught up with Abram to talk about the development of the Tenement Museum and her vision for it. (Responses have been edited for clarity and length.)... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

[Preservation Tips & Tools] Round-Up: The Starter Kit for Renovating Historic Homes

Posted on: November 18th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

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Buying a historic house with the intention of fixing it up is a significant undertaking -- and one that can come with its share of surprises. Understanding how to ask the right questions before you begin renovating is key to the overall success of your project. This round-up of toolkits from the 10 on Tuesday vault (now Preservation Tips & Tools) will help give you an idea of what to consider and how to find sensible solutions as you look to restore or rehabilitate your newly acquired treasure. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

This Old House: Fisherman Brown’s Cottage

Posted on: November 17th, 2014 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Written by Susan Pollack

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Susan Pollack and her husband spent years hunting for their dream home, ultimately choosing this 1735 cottage in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

The day my husband and I bought our house, the real estate agent gave us a loose-leaf binder with copies of maps and deeds dating back to 1735, when a fisherman named Joseph Brown built the Cape Ann Cottage.

For years we had looked at houses. We’d hoped to find a roomy, if neglected, Victorian that, with our efforts, might one day resemble one of the Gloucester houses celebrated by Edward Hopper. But “an antique?” That’s how our agent described the tiny gambrel-roofed cottage. Seeing its exposed adze-hewn beams, wide pine floorboards and fireplace, we said yes immediately.

I had lived in other people’s homes all of my adult life. Suddenly, I was not only a homeowner, but a steward of a piece of Cape Ann history. What does it mean to acquire a building with an historic marker posted on its clapboards? Does one’s responsibility go beyond keeping cedar shingles on the roof and a satellite dish off it? When you buy a house, do you inherit a responsibility to its history as well?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.