See the James River in a New Way (and Help Protect the View)

Posted on: November 28th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

By Sharee Williamson, Associate General Counsel

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The James River, one of our new National Treasures, is facing a severe development threat.

Earlier this year the National Trust named the James River at Jamestown to our list of National Treasures deserving protection. The threat facing the James River is Dominion Virginia Power’s plans to build a high voltage transmission line that would be visible from Jamestown Island, Colonial Parkway, and other resources located in the heart of Virginia’s Historic Triangle.

Additionally, the James River itself is part of the first congressionally designated national water trail -- the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail -- which traces the history of the Chesapeake from the 17th century.

With the theory that a picture is worth a thousand words, the National Trust put together a story map using GIS technology to help the public better understand and visualize the threat posed by the transmission line. Take a look:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Hope for the Future: Why We’re Thankful for You in Preservation

Posted on: November 27th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

We've had an incredible year here at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and we have much to be thankful for -- namely, you! Thanks to passionate preservationists like you who contribute to our efforts, we're able to continue saving America's historic places in communities around the country -- and the results are moving.

So take a minute this Thanksgiving to check out three remarkable stories that showcase the very best qualities of the preservation movement: its energy, its hope, and its people.


HOPE FOR THE FUTURE by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

From our community to yours, Happy Thanksgiving!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[Historic Bars] The Warren Tavern in Charlestown, Massachusetts

Posted on: November 26th, 2014 by Geoff Montes 1 Comment

 

Did George Washington really sleep here? In our next round of Historic Bars, we're stopping at the crossroads of time and history to explore old taverns and inns around the country -- the kind with wooden signs, rooms for lodging, and a century (or two) of fascinating stories. Next in line: The Warren Tavern in Charlestown, Massachusetts.

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The Warren Tavern first opened its doors in 1780, five years after the Battle of Bunker Hill left Charlestown in ruins. 

The Warren Tavern’s charming address of 2 Pleasant Street in Charlestown belies its origin as a Revolutionary War haunt frequented by Paul Revere and George Washington. Established in 1780, the Tavern was one of the first buildings erected in Charlestown after the bloody Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775, when British forces left the town in ruins. Among the colonial casualties was the tavern’s namesake, Dr. Joseph Warren, a physician and general who played an integral role in the American Revolution.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

 

Written by Tina Connor, Executive Vice President, Indiana Landmarks

A c. 1935 photo shows Wright’s influence in the design of Peters-Margedant House by William Wesley Peters.
A c. 1935 photo shows Wright’s influence in the design of Peters-Margedant House by William Wesley (Wes) Peters.

Most people know of Frank Lloyd Wright, the famous and influential American architect. Wes Peters (1921-1991), his right-hand man? Not so much.

Wright’s first Taliesin apprentice in 1932, Peters took a two-year break from the architect and returned to his hometown of Evansville, Indiana, from mid-1933 to 1935. Love caused the flight: Peters fell in love with Wright’s stepdaughter Svetlana, then a teenager, and her parents mightily disapproved.

Two years later, the Wrights relented. Peters and Svetlana married and returned to Taliesin, where Peters remained for the rest of his life, becoming chief architect after the master’s death in 1959 and retaining the title until his own death in 1991.

Though he would never claim credit as first, the humble apprentice designed the Usonian-style Peters-Margedant House in Evansville in 1935, two years before Frank Lloyd Wright’s first Usonian appeared in Madison, Wisconsin, in 1937. The Evansville house shows that Peters internalized Frank Lloyd Wright’s philosophy of organic architecture and his thoughts on creating affordable homes. Art historian Richard Guy Wilson believes the tiny house possesses national significance.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

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Guests can dine beneath cathedral ceilings at the former First Baptist Church -- now Terrapin Restaurant -- in Rhinebeck, New York

In the Fall 2014 issue of Preservation we brought you our first roundup of churches-turned-restaurants, following it up shortly thereafter with a blog post featuring even more heavenly cuisine. In case your prayers still weren't answered, here are three brand-new selections sure to please the palates of even the most devout food-lovers.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.