The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament Round 3 Recap

Posted on: March 27th, 2015 by David Weible No Comments

 

Milwaukee’s Holler House is home to the nation’s oldest certified bowling alley.
Milwaukee’s Holler House is home to the nation’s oldest certified bowling alley.

Fun fact: We received more than 13,000 (!) votes in the latest round of The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament 2015 -- which means everyone must have been comfortably seated on their favorite bar stool, sending in vote after vote for their historic bar of choice.

And who can blame them for such loyal devotion? Our Final Four are colorful and crazy, wild and welcoming -- everything a great bar should be. Check out who is still in the running for a championship slot. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Historic Real Estate: Historic Inns and Hotels Edition

Posted on: March 26th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson No Comments

 

150324_blog-photo_Mountain-View-Inn
The Mountain View Inn is within the vicinity of Norfolk Chamber Music Festival, presented by the Yale School of Music.

Mountain View Inn -- Norfolk, Connecticut

Mountain View Inn is a charming country hideaway that offers the perfect retreat for guests, and a promising commercial venture for any potential entrepreneur. Located in Litchfield Hills region of the Berkshires, this Victorian mansion, built in 1880, offers nine bedrooms, nine bathrooms, a Grand Hall, and a formal living and dining room, all perfect for hosting wedding parties, business and conference guests, and tourists to the quaint town of Norfolk. When business is booming and extra space is needed, there is a guesthouse behind the Inn with two bedrooms, one bathroom, a kitchen, and living room. The Mountain View Inn always has potential for business due to its vicinity to Norfolk’s Infinity Hall and Bistro and the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival’s concerts, recitals, and classes. Price: $895,000

150326_blog photo_Wheat Growers 2
One luminary that visited the Wheat Growers Hotel was Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Wheat Growers Hotel -- Kimball, Nebraska

Built in 1918 by Frank Cunningham, one of the most successful wheat growers in Nebraska at the time, the Wheat Growers Hotel was considered the best hotel between Omaha and Denver during the 1920s, ‘30s, and ‘40s. Its 86 rooms had hot and cold running water and electricity, a novelty for the times. The stylish basement ballroom and restaurant were the venue for some of Kimball’s most elegant parties during the post-World War I era.

The Wheat Growers Hotel was built adjacent to a train depot and, as a result, was a melting pot for people from all regions and walks of life. (One luminary to visit was Dwight D. Eisenhower.) However, as automobile travel became more popular, passenger railway travel declined and the Wheat Growers Hotel’s business dwindled. In 1988 the hotel permanently closed its doors, but now it is looking for a business- and preservation-savvy owner to restore it to its former elegance and glory. Price: $51,000

150326_blog-photo_Graystone2
The Graystone Inn has been recognized by American Historic Inns, Inc. as one of the "Top 10 Most Romantic Inns in the U.S."

Graystone Inn -- Wilmington, North Carolina

Built in 1905 and located in North Carolina’s largest historic district, the Graystone Inn boasts not only Southern charm, but also modern elegance. Already recognized by American Historic Inns, Inc. as one of the “Top 10 Most Romantic Inns in the U.S.,” and as a Four Diamond hotel by AAA, the Graystone has a reputation that any potential proprietor can be proud of -- and profit from. With nine guest suites and a large first floor that holds 100 or more guests, the Inn is the perfect venue for any special event. The Graystone also has a two-bedroom owner’s quarters and a one-bedroom apartment suitable for use as a long term rental space or as an office. Price: $2,850,000

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

150324_blog-photo_trefethen-1
Post-earthquake, the first floor of the 1886 winery building leans about four feet to the west.

At 3:20 a.m. on August 24, 2014, the ground in Napa, California started shaking, heralding a 6.0 magnitude earthquake. It was the region's largest seismic activity since 1989's Loma Prieta quake, and although it only lasted about 10 to 20 seconds, varying by location, that was more than enough time for the temblor to tear buildings apart, spark fires, and send hundreds to area hospitals with injuries. It also caused millions of dollars worth of damage to homes, businesses and infrastructure, and especially the region's famous wineries.

One of the hardest hit wineries was Trefethen Family Vineyards, an operation known throughout the valley for its unique wooden production building dating from 1886. I spoke with Hailey Trefethen, a third-generation vintner who works with her family’s winemaking and viticulture operations, about the damage sustained to Trefethen’s iconic National Register-listed building and the rehabilitation efforts than are underway.

Now propped up on steel buttresses, the building is estimated to take about one to two years to restore, and the total cost of the overhaul is not yet known. The Trefethen family, however, hasn’t let the damage to its beloved building crush its spirits.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

By Barbara Lau, Director of the Pauli Murray Project at Duke Human Rights Center

150325_blog-photo_PM-R-Fitzgerald-House
Future home of the Pauli Murray Center for History and Social Justice, 2012.

Pauli Murray (1910-1985) was an accomplished human rights activist, historian, attorney, poet, and teacher who believed in justice, reconciliation, and freedom. “As an American,” she wrote in 1945, “I inherit the magnificent tradition of an endless march toward freedom and toward the dignity of all mankind.”

Mentor to luminaries such as Eleanor Holmes Norton, Marion Wright Edelman, and Ruth Bader Ginsberg, Pauli Murray referred to this march in a Ms. Magazine interview as a relay race. Today, the goal of the Pauli Murray Center for History and Social Justice is to nurture the next generation of Pauli Murrays -- and its new home will be none other than her childhood house.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

150324_blog-photo_Alex-Browne
Bodie is preserved in a state of "arrested decay" -- meaning everything stays just as it was when the abandoned town was acquired by the state parks department in 1962.

No one comes to Bodie, California, for the gold anymore.

That kind of traffic peaked in the late-19th century, after a mine cave-in in 1875 revealed vast quantities of gold ore. People from all over the world rushed to the high desert town, hoping to strike it rich. And with nearly 10,000 tons of ore extracted from the mine, it was one of the richest gold strikes in California.

By 1879, there were nearly 10,000 people living in Bodie. More than 2,000 buildings dotted the rolling hills: as many as 70 saloons, a bowling alley, dance halls, gambling halls, general stores, hotels, churches, and about 200 restaurants.

150324_blog-photo_Bodie-Then
At its peak circa 1879, Bodie, California, had a population of nearly 10,000 people and more than 2,000 buildings.

But its heyday didn’t last long. By 1881, the mines were depleted, miners left for new areas, mining companies went bankrupt. There was a boost in production again in the 1890s, a few years after a fire ravaged much of the town. But in 1932, another fire burned all but 10 percent of Bodie, and by the 1940s, it was essentially abandoned. In 1962, what remained of Bodie after that 1932 conflagration was declared a State Historic Park and a National Historic Landmark.

Today, decades later, crowds still flock this remote region of the eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains, northeast of Yosemite, to visit Bodie. But it’s not gold they seek -- it’s a genuine ghost town experience.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

The Royal Visit Continues: Preservation in Louisville

Posted on: March 23rd, 2015 by David Weible No Comments

 

150323_blog-photo_prince-charles9and10
(Left) The Prince of Wales arrives at Louisville's Filson Historical Society for the announcement of Heart of Louisville as the National Trust's newest National Treasure. (Right) National Trust President and CEO Stephanie Meeks meets with Prince Charles.

On Friday, March 20, the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall continued their visit to the United States in Louisville, Kentucky. As with previous days spent in Washington, D.C., the royal couple devoted significant time to the American historic preservation movement and the National Trust itself.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.