Widening the Preservation Lens

Posted on: October 30th, 2014 by Stephanie Meeks No Comments

 

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Left: Stephanie Meeks, speaking to architecture students at Hampton University about the need to preserve more historic places that represent the diverse history of our nation. Right: Stephanie Meeks and Germonique Ulmer, vice president of Public Affairs, at the Emancipation Oak on Hampton University's campus.

On a recent visit to Hampton University, one of our nation’s oldest and most esteemed historically black universities, I took part in a fascinating conversation with architecture students about what preservation means to them, and how we can work together to ensure the places we save reflect the diverse stories of all Americans.

We began our discussion with a visualization exercise. Take a moment to picture a place that matters to you. It may be your home, a park, a church, a school. What has it meant to your life? Does it connect you to your community? What does it say about who you are?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Stephanie Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks is president and CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

[Historic Bars] The Owl Bar in Baltimore, Maryland

Posted on: October 30th, 2014 by Beth Lennon No Comments

 

Fans of the giggle water get to celebrate hooch in a big way this month as Preservation Nation covers blind pigs and juice joints -- a.k.a. speakeasies -- as part of our historic bars series. Next up: The Owl Bar in Baltimore, Maryland.

The nursery rhyme above the bar is a clue into the speakeasy past of Baltimore’s Owl Bar.
The nursery rhyme above the bar is a clue into the speakeasy past of Baltimore’s Owl Bar.

A wise old owl sat in an oak / the more he saw the less he spoke
The less he spoke the more he heard / why can't we all be like that wise old bird?

First-time visitors to the Owl Bar may be amused by the appearance of a nursery rhyme embedded in stained glass above the antique backbar at Baltimore’s landmark Belvedere Hotel. More than a quaint decoration, however, the rhyming couplet is actually a nod to the Prohibition-era legacy that the bar’s feathered mascots played a major part in.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beth Lennon

Beth Lennon is the creator of the website RetroRoadmap.com. As "Mod Betty," she delights as the retro travel "hostess with the mostess," scouting out cool vintage places and sharing them with the world.

 

Written by Daniel Ronan, Site Projects & Public Engagement Coordinator, National Public Housing Museum

Muralist Hector Duarte in front of his Pilsen home and studio, with "Gulliver in Wonderland" mural.
Muralist Hector Duarte in front of his Pilsen home and studio, with "Gulliver in Wonderland" mural.

“Morally, there needs to be a defense of public art,” says Hector Duarte, an accomplished Mexican-American muralist and painter sitting in his Chicago home and studio of fifteen years.

Pilsen, his neighborhood, has been squarely Latino since the mid-1960s, and has been a haven for exploring the mural as an artistic medium. With murals up and down the community’s main thoroughfare of 18th Street, it’s hard not to spot several towering masterpieces depicting cultural, political, and religious themes exquisitely painted over 150-year-old masonry.

Originally a German and Irish neighborhood, and later Czech, Pilsen’s vibrant street life -- now filled with taco joints, bodegas, and thrift stores -- masks a broader struggle. With higher-than-average crime, increased development, and changing demographics, many consider the neighborhood ripe for gentrification. Moving south and west in the city, many Latinos have planted new roots in Little Village, affectionately called “La Villita” by the locals.

Broader demographic and neighborhood changes place the future of historic mural art into question. Can Pilsen hold onto its legacy of mural art given the increased pressures of development, the ephemeral nature of artwork exposed to the elements, and a shift in thinking of younger generations away from the lasting relevance of mural art?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

[Preservation Tips & Tools] Find Funding for Emergency/Intervention Preservation Projects

Posted on: October 28th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

Written by Diana Maxwell, Associate Manager, Grants

Unexpected damage to a historic building can be devastating, and figuring out the next steps can be overwhelming. The good news: The National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Emergency/Intervention Fund (E/I) Grants might be able to help.

While our Grants team hopes you never have a reason to ask about E/I Funds, a grant for planning from the National Trust could be just what you need to kickstart a campaign to return a building to use post-disaster.

This toolkit shares how you can apply for (and hopefully receive) an E/I grant. While funding is limited, we want to help as much as we can, so check out the steps and see if your project fits the bill.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

Choreographer Hattie Mae Williams and her dance troupe, The Tattooed Ballerinas, are presenting site-specific performances at two historic sites in Miami: Miami Marine Stadium and the Venetian Pool in Coral Gables.
Choreographer Hattie Mae Williams (left) and her dance troupe, The Tattooed Ballerinas, are presenting site-specific performances at two historic sites in Miami: Miami Marine Stadium and the Venetian Pool in Coral Gables.

Miami native Hattie Mae Williams is on a mission to change how we see public spaces. And she’s set her sights on her hometown.

Through her Miami Sites Project, Williams, a recipient of a 2013 Knight Arts Challenge Miami grant, is celebrating two of her city’s iconic, historic sites: Miami Marine Stadium and the Venetian Pool in Coral Gables, which is celebrating its 90th birthday this year.

Her method? Dance.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.